#1
Basically, have a song recorded and mixed as I want in Cubase.

Very slight multiband compressor on the master output, but nothing else on it.

Exported as WAV, then imported that to master it a bit. Limited the track to around -3dB, boosted the input volume to about +7dB, exported as WAV and played in iTunes, yet the volume is still as low as before I mastered it at all, well below the other "commercial" release stuff in my library.

I'm not aiming to brickwall it and get it professionally done, just raise the volume to a better level.

What do?
#2
There's a difference between actual volume and perceived volume; you want to increase the perceived volume. Use a mastering plugin such as izotope ozone to boost pereceived volume.
#3
Quote by Ultima2876
There's a difference between actual volume and perceived volume; you want to increase the perceived volume.


Correct. "Perceived volume" is basically the fact that your ears will hear an "average" volume as the perceived volume. You can't get the loudest parts any louder without clipping, so in order to increase the average volume, you have to make the quieter parts louder. This is what a compressor and a limiter do.

Quote by Ultima2876

Use a mastering plugin such as izotope ozone to boost pereceived volume.


No Mastering Engineer uses a "mastering plugin." They will use compressors and limters. OP is using compression. Ozone is basically a compressor/limter with a couple of other goodies thrown in for good measure.

Quote by SkepsisMetal
Limited the track to around -3dB


This is your problem. Try limiting the track to -0.1 db.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
Are their any basic Mastering tutorials about... I'm kinda lost when it comes to using a limiter, never really used one before.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
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#5
A limiter is a compressor with an brickwall ratio so nothing goes over the threshold. As in...it limits the sound beyond a certain point. Try -0.3 not -3db

I'd then look at your multiband. Make sure the kick or the snare is not going to falsely trigger the limiter. I'd also look at M/S EQ and filters and ensuring you low end is mono centered and that you have filter out any useless low end in your multi-track (This will eat up headroom and make the track quieter.) Then look at your limiter. IF you've done all of these things you should be able to knock a few more DB of perceived volume.

Also keep in mind that your upper midrange has a natural frequency bump in your ears and will make it seem louder. So you can get a little more brightness and it give the illusion of being louder than it is.

But you also need to remember that most low end systems have a large bump here. So you can run into problems and give a it a harsh mid range quality.

As a good guideline though try a -.3db threshold, -3-4 db reduction in gain and an RMS level (Use a meter) of between 10 and 12db But this music dependent.

And if you want to get better. Try http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Audio-Science-Bob-Katz/dp/0240805453
Last edited by Wild Hopkins at Mar 11, 2012,