#1
Hi all, I was wondering, how the hell do you build something with chamber pockets in it as I've heard that it isn't just random holes in the guitar. The reason I wish to chamber a guitar is because I plan to eventually build a double-necked telecaster (might make a build thread in GB&C) and I like to build stuff out of oak as I've had much success with it, but a double neck would just be too heavy. So how do I chamber it?
#6
I have all the tools to do the job, just I want advice before I try it if I do at all. If this information is relevant to you, the top neck will be a twelve string and the bottom a six string. I don't HAVE to use oak, but I like it (it doesn't splinter as much as everyone says), and I want it to still sound very much like a traditional telecaster, but with a twist obviously.
#7
A Tele is borderline neck-heavy to begin with due to the short upper bout. A double neck Tele would be a recipe for disaster.
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#8
Quote by Vulcan
A Tele is borderline neck-heavy to begin with due to the short upper bout. A double neck Tele would be a recipe for disaster.


Any double neck would be neck-heavy. If I like Teles and I want a double neck, why not? How many double neck Teles have you played/owned?
#9
chambering isn't as simple as taking some wood out of the guitar. there are actual physics behind it. if you chamber correctly, you'll improve certain aspects of the tone (can vary based on what your actual goal is), and if you chamber incorrectly you could, conceivably, end up with an instrument that doesn't resonate properly.

that being said, it is possible to find pictures of chambered guitars and use those as guidelines (there is a particularly nice photo of a chambered taylor in guitar buyer). you'll need some fairly good equipment to do it well.

I personally wouldn't try it, but if you do adequate research, it could work
#10
Quote by Myaccount876
Any double neck would be neck-heavy. If I like Teles and I want a double neck, why not? How many double neck Teles have you played/owned?

What has that got to do with anything? All I said is that the Tele has a neck heavy tendency to begin with and a double neck would make it worse. I own a regular Tele. If you want to struggle because you think it would be 'cool', go right ahead and ignore advice you asked for, and be rude to those who give it.
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#11
Quote by Vulcan
What has that got to do with anything? All I said is that the Tele has a neck heavy tendency to begin with and a double neck would make it worse. I own a regular Tele. If you want to struggle because you think it would be 'cool', go right ahead and ignore advice you asked for, and be rude to those who give it.


The reason I was so "rude" was because you just came in here discouraging the idea calling it "a recipe for disaster" when it is something I want to do. You didn't even mention chambering in your post, which is what I asked about. Who's "rude" now?

OT: So I guess chambering isn't worth it? I should just use a lighter wood, neck heavy or not. Pine would probably work fine, as it was used on the first Telecasters, just that it dents easily so maybe poplar?
Last edited by Myaccount876 at Mar 12, 2012,
#12
Quote by Myaccount876
The reason I was so "rude" was because you just came in here discouraging the idea calling it "a recipe for disaster" when it is something I want to do. You didn't even mention chambering in your post, which is what I asked about. Who's "rude" now?

If you think that was rude, I'm sure you're going to think I'm being a downright dick when I say my Tele is chambered, I've selected the lightest tuners I could find, and a neck carve that makes for a rather light neck, and it is still neck heavy, probably in part due to the chambering. I'm merely telling you what to expect if you go ahead with your project. Whether it's something you want to do or not, you need to think the whole thing through. If you're doing it just to be cool, well, I have to wonder how old you are, because the maturity of your thought process already leaves a lot to be desired.
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#13
Quote by Myaccount876
The reason I was so "rude" was because you just came in here discouraging the idea calling it "a recipe for disaster" when it is something I want to do. You didn't even mention chambering in your post, which is what I asked about. Who's "rude" now?

OT: So I guess chambering isn't worth it? I should just use a lighter wood, neck heavy or not. Pine would probably work fine, as it was used on the first Telecasters, just that it dents easily so maybe poplar?


I've always liked swamp ash tele's (I currently have a swamp ash G&L). its lighter that oak for sure, and it sounds great for tele's.

poplar would also be cool. it can be a bit of a bitch to work with (it cracks fairly easily compared to some), but it sounds pretty good. I've only played a few poplar guitars, but they were really nice and balanced.

also, a double neck tele would be awesome. I would kill to have a humbucker loaded tele and a regular tele together. would make some songs sound so much better
#14
Firstly, double neck teles do not have any noticable problems with balance, at least no more than any other double neck.

However, if you do chamber the body then you'd certainly have to be careful with how you attached the strap. I can't imagine, even with heavy chambering, the guitar would suffer from noticable neck-dive, but it'll certainly shift more of the weight into your hand and that's not comfortable for long periods. If you'll only be using this guitar for one or two songs then I don't see the harm, but I wouldn't expect to play a whole show with it. Of course, if you don't chamber it it'll take some relief off your fretting hand, but then it'll put more strain on your back. Never underestimate how heavy a double neck can be, even if you use fairly light wood.

As far as chambering the thing goes, it's a hard process on a single guitar and damn near impossible to do well on a double neck. You have to be very careful with where you cut holes, so you don't **** up the structural integrity of the body; remember that with a double neck, there's twice as much weight and strain being put on everything. You also then need to veneer the whole top (or back) of the guitar, which obviously is a pain in the arse to do with such a large body.

Double necks also do tend to have a slightly darker tone anyway, and chambering them will increase that. If you want to retain any of the normal Tele tone, I'd suggest you stick with a solid body design.

Oak is certainly not a wood I'd recommend. Neither is pine; it's good for regular Teles, but it's a little too soft to be appropriate for a double neck. Poplar would be a bit pointless, since you can get the same tone with less weight (and a nicer look) from other woods. Alder and ash are the obvious choices, as they're two of the few woods that retain some brightness and aren't ridiculously heavy when used for a double neck. If you do insist on having a chambered body, try rock maple (bright tone) or makore (warmer). Both are ideal for chambering as they're so dense, though of course this does mean they're rather heavy and so a chambered body would likely weigh as much as a regular solid alder one.
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#15
Thanks for all of the legitimate help from people, and I think I'll go with

Quote by Vulcan
If you think that was rude, I'm sure you're going to think I'm being a downright dick when I say my Tele is chambered, I've selected the lightest tuners I could find, and a neck carve that makes for a rather light neck, and it is still neck heavy, probably in part due to the chambering. I'm merely telling you what to expect if you go ahead with your project. Whether it's something you want to do or not, you need to think the whole thing through. If you're doing it just to be cool, well, I have to wonder how old you are, because the maturity of your thought process already leaves a lot to be desired.


Condescending much? I'm not trying to be cool, but it is an interesting idea to me and I can come up with a few uses of having a 12-string electric, but you can't really play lead on a 12-string or switch guitars. It also has potential for having a great sound.
Last edited by Myaccount876 at Mar 12, 2012,
#16
If you're going the 12-string route, I'll warn you that it is incredibly hard to find Tele bridges that take 12 strings. A Strat & Tele double neck would make life easier for you, since 12-string Strat hardtail bridges are everywhere.
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#17
Quote by Myaccount876
I'm not trying to be cool, but it is an interesting idea to me and I can come up with a few uses of having a 12-string electric, but you can't really play lead on a 12-string or switch guitars. It also has potential for having a great sound.

Great. That is all the reason anyone really needs to try an idea. It's going to be a lot of work, and you just need to be sure you are as prepared as you can be. Best of luck, and be sure to post a build thread.
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Swart STR Tweed
Quilter 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#18
Quote by MrFlibble
If you're going the 12-string route, I'll warn you that it is incredibly hard to find Tele bridges that take 12 strings. A Strat & Tele double neck would make life easier for you, since 12-string Strat hardtail bridges are everywhere.


Got it covered. Just getting a gotoh 12-string bridge and mounting a pickup somewhere.

Quote by Vulcan
Great. That is all the reason anyone really needs to try an idea. It's going to be a lot of work, and you just need to be sure you are as prepared as you can be. Best of luck, and be sure to post a build thread.


Thanks, and I'll be sure to make a build thread for it, once I'm done with my current build of course.