#1
So I have this band me and a freind formed in December. We have 5-6 songs that come in at about 30 mins. but we are always gonna be working on more. All we need now is lyrics and vocals which me and the other vocalist/guitarist have lots of ideas for so we're are just about ready to start gigging seriously.
We are not in high school and haven't been for a while, however this is MY first real band, not the other members first real band. We have alot of friends in bands, but it's mostly deathcore and "deathscrew" bands and we are more progmetalpopjazz-core.Our music is technical, heavy and quite melodic, but not overbaringly so in any direction
Here's my question, what could we do to make the biggest mark possible do for our first gig to really make a big impression? Like what should we focus on to make the biggest impact on as many people as we possibly can?


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#3
Maybe play good music? I don't see where you're going with this. Over time you may develop fans but less you want to be all gimmicky I don't see what 'special' thing you're trying to accomplish on a gig.
#4
progmetalpopjazz-core?

really?

you want to make a mark? First thing you do on stage is say to the audience that progmetalpopjazz-core is the genre you are playing. Then watch everyone laugh at you for a good while. Later youll get a call at 3am the following Tuesday, it seems someone had recorded that video and put it on youtube. Youve become a viral sensation, thus making a mark on your first show.

Congrats!
#5
whatever style you want to be a part of, find other people in bands. make friends with them, not in a creepy facebook message but go to their shows and talk to them afterwards, be buddies for a while, youll inevitably talk about music and yall will show each other your bands, after that, boom, youve got a band in your direction that will need an opener sometime, do that ALOT,and youll be playing more and gaining a fanbase more quickly.
#6
Quote by jer-bear5212
whatever style you want to be a part of, find other people in bands. make friends with them, not in a creepy facebook message but go to their shows and talk to them afterwards, be buddies for a while, youll inevitably talk about music and yall will show each other your bands, after that, boom, youve got a band in your direction that will need an opener sometime, do that ALOT,and youll be playing more and gaining a fanbase more quickly.


This. Showing up regularly to local bands gigs in your area is the best exposure you can get. Those bands will start showing up to your gigs with their freinds and so on and so on. Just focus on a tight set and talking to people, it sounds simple but when your starting out keeping it simple is key.
#7
Quote by hyper5
Just focus on a tight set and talking to people, it sounds simple but when your starting out keeping it simple is key.
I agree with this.
#8
Quote by ridonkulous420
what does adding core do?

It makes it a joke...take one
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#9
i think that your own thing will come up in time, and you don't have to worry about it now - every band develops its own 'personality' sooner or later.
but for the first gig, in my experience, just practice a lot, alone and together, and just play really good - imagine someone in the crowd listening and thinking "man, for a first gig, they sound awesome!". that sparks interest and people will pay attention to what you guys are doing, that's what i think of a good first gig.
#10
Thanks. I'm quite nervous about how well we'll go over even though we haven't played live yet. Thats why I post such similar threads. Not to sound douchey, but our music really is quite different from the other band in my area. It's mostly deathcore, a houston varient of deathcore called "Deathscrew", buzz rock (like shinedown mixed with tool and alter bridge) or fall of troy/mars volta rip-offs!!!
I put alot of time and hardwork into writing the best songs I can and finding the best musicians I could and I just want to be as prepared for whatever, even though I know realistically there's no way to prepare for everything about being in a band. All of my friends are in bands and I've felt left out from the fun. Alot of them are a bit more established so it wouldn't be too hard to play shows with them, but I'm just worried and thinking really far ahead. Thanks/Sorry for listening to my tirades!!!
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#11
Quote by hyper5
This. Showing up regularly to local bands gigs in your area is the best exposure you can get. Those bands will start showing up to your gigs with their freinds and so on and so on.


sphhh...What fantasy world are you living in?
#12
Any extravagant stage move will probably back fire, concentrate on performing like you believe in what you're doing, no staring at you fret hand behind your fringe. Move in a non-retarded way if you can, don't joke around on stage too much either unless its easily appreciable physical comedy that an audience can appreciate, as generally it looks unprofessional. Also being tight as **** never hurts.
SMILE!
Last edited by Mr.DeadDuck at Mar 12, 2012,
#13
As has pretty much been said, make sure you're super tight as a band, and have good stage presence.

I've been to a countless number of gigs, both local and larger, the bands which aren't as tight and have more of a "boring" presence are the bands I easily forget. But bands who are real tight and real fun to watch, I still remember perfectly, even bands of genres I don't even enjoy.
#15
Quote by scguitarking927
sphhh...What fantasy world are you living in?

Australia =)

For a time a band I was in got invited to play gigs every day when we didn't have our own show on. When we were headlining a show we gave support spots bands who in turn did the same for us and it snowballed into about 15 bands giving each other gigs every week. We had more gig offers than we could fill for around 2 years straight and 15 bands worth of fans and friends showing up to every show. Shit was cash.

Funniest thing about it is we were all pretty mediocre bands at the time but outside people showing up to our shows would of thought we were massive signed bands. Networking with similar bands will get you further than any label or management when your just starting out unless you consider yourself RAWKSTARZ who are above scratching other bands backs.
Last edited by hyper5 at Mar 13, 2012,
#16
Quote by sonny bb
So I have this band me and a freind formed in December. We have 5-6 songs that come in at about 30 mins. but we are always gonna be working on more. All we need now is lyrics and vocals which me and the other vocalist/guitarist have lots of ideas for so we're are just about ready to start gigging seriously.


No you're not. You're not even half way ready dude. You have "5-6" songs which aren't even finished. You can't decide whether you have five or six, and you don't know for sure that it'll clock in at 30 minutes - that means your "songs" are on average 5-6 minutes long.

First finish the songs. Yes this means getting vocals finished, which is the most important part of a song.

Second get them tight.

Third time the set so you actually know how many songs you have.

If you have less than 30 minutes, write more. 30 minutes is minimum, most original sets want 45 minutes.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#17
Quote by AlanHB
No you're not. You're not even half way ready dude. You have "5-6" songs which aren't even finished. You can't decide whether you have five or six, and you don't know for sure that it'll clock in at 30 minutes - that means your "songs" are on average 5-6 minutes long.

First finish the songs. Yes this means getting vocals finished, which is the most important part of a song.

Second get them tight.

Third time the set so you actually know how many songs you have.

If you have less than 30 minutes, write more. 30 minutes is minimum, most original sets want 45 minutes.


I didn't say we had our first show in an hour, I said we are finishing working on our set. the songs we have (sans vocals) we do in fact have tight as a unit. We just decided that we are going to have vocals in fact as the music sounds complete without it. Thats the easiest part (the hard part is playing and singing, but it's no big deal).

The "5-6" thing is that we have 1 song that doesn't quite sound like the others and we're debating on whether to use it. We have 6 total with a seventh being worked on. We rehearse the songs we write as we write them. The sets for newer bands in my area last 30 mins. Thats why I said THIRTY MINUTES!!!!!
If you read my other post, you'd know that I'm just trying to be well prepared. You don't have to tell me things I know about everytime. But it would be nice if you helped me with the things I ask about
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#18
^^^ Actuallty if you're looking to make the biggest impact, I would recommend finishing your songs. Audiences love finished songs.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#19
Quote by sonny bb
I didn't say we had our first show in an hour, I said we are finishing working on our set. the songs we have (sans vocals) we do in fact have tight as a unit. We just decided that we are going to have vocals in fact as the music sounds complete without it. Thats the easiest part (the hard part is playing and singing, but it's no big deal).

The "5-6" thing is that we have 1 song that doesn't quite sound like the others and we're debating on whether to use it. We have 6 total with a seventh being worked on. We rehearse the songs we write as we write them. The sets for newer bands in my area last 30 mins. Thats why I said THIRTY MINUTES!!!!!
If you read my other post, you'd know that I'm just trying to be well prepared. You don't have to tell me things I know about everytime. But it would be nice if you helped me with the things I ask about


One thing I must say, is that the music does not sound complete without vocals. The fact of the matter is, making decent money out of prog is unlikely, even with vocals, so don't think of your songs as finished songs without vocals, because complete the song, and sometimes even make it. I'd try to come up with vocal lines that shine on their own, and not just add to the song, for instance, listen to Serpent's Kiss by Symphony X, very technical, very challenging, but the part that I remembered most was 'FEEL THE POWER COARSING THROUGH MY VEEEEEEEIIINS', as it's clear, memorable, and triumphant.

Now, I have no clue how you sound, but if you want to make a mark, combine your technical ability with your ability to be commercially viable. You don't want it to be a Deathcore Noise VS Pretentious Bullshit choice for audiences, if Deathcore is big in your area, because if you show yourself off as mindless note-wankers with a 'I'm better than you attitude', people will turn off. You need to focus on enjoying the music. That's the downfall of Prog, you can't really move lots to it, as the pulse isn't steady, I've seen crowds of people attempt to headbang to Meshuggah, looked bloody ridiculous, would look worse onstage. But what you can do, is really get into each section of the song, and help put the emotion of it across.

However, if you do change time signatures rapidly for the sake of it, you can't really do that, and you will be limiting your audiences to musicians, and even still, you'll have to be something special, or you'll be like 'Aww cute, amateur guitarist wants to be Petrucci', so, basically, keep the time signature wankery to a minimum. Pull Me Under was a hit. Dance Of Eternity was not (though still an ace song). It really is about being something special. In an unsigned band, I look for a good singer, a likeable face to the band. If you stumble in your crowd speeches, don't awkwardly cover it, enjoy it as part of the live experience ('There's some free flyers over there. What. Of course they're free, they're flyers' Awake By Design).

Also, never say Progmetalpopjazzcore. For the following reason.

Prog Metal Fan; "Popcore? Bloody hell, what's this coming to. Bet they just change to a major key and do 'happy breakdowns' or some shit. I'm gonna go listen to Dream Theater."

Pop Fan; "Metalcore? Isn't that that screaming stuff?"

Jazz Fan; "Pop? God, these wannabe 'musicians' nowadays throwing the term 'Jazz' about whenever they fancy. Avoid."

And it just sounds silly. So basically, drop the 'core, unless you are Mathcore, in which case, do not expect to make much money, don't expect to make any money, really, to be honest. I'd bet you aren't as skilled as the guys from Dillinger Escape Plan, or what have you, so you'd come across as a poor man's version of them unless you were as tight as a signed band. No instrumental solos. Cut down on the wankery in each song, if there is a lot of it, most of these people have seen better musicians, have your moment, but don't act like you're better than Petrucci, many guitarists fall into this trap, and they just look stupid. Plus, it's not as good to listen to as some of Petrucci's minute-long solos. And, if you are really Prog, play to a metronome. Nothing is worse to listen to than a sloppy time signature change, or a song slowly dieing a slow, painful 85bpm death.
#20
Man, you're asking the forum a question and then arguing with people who have years of experience in this sort of thing.

Quote by sonny bb
I didn't say we had our first show in an hour,


Well, when IS your first gig? I mean, if you're expressing worry about how to make an impact, it must be *reasonably* close, no?

Quote by sonny bb

We just decided that we are going to have vocals in fact as the music sounds complete without it.


If it sounds complete without vocals, then why add vocals? Won't the vocals just compete with the melodic interest that is already there? Or are they really not all that complete sounding, which is why you chose to add vocals?

My guess would be the latter, not because I know anything about you specifically, but because I know a lot about how bands develop.

Quote by sonny bb

We have 6 total with a seventh being worked on. We rehearse the songs we write as we write them.


Rehearsing is doing them the same way every time until they're perfect. If you're still writing them, one has to assume that they are not yet written (basic logic), which means that they are in the process of developing and being refined. In other words, at this point, you are probably NOT playing them exactly the same way twice. This is not rehearsing.

Quote by sonny bb

You don't have to tell me things I know about everytime. But it would be nice if you helped me with the things I ask about


In the end, unless you have an expensive production (which is going to come off as forced and ridiculous in a 30 minute set with four other bands or whatever), the things that are going to set you apart from the other bands will not surprise you:

-great songs
-tight as f**k
-be personable
-have fun and BE fun

The only other thing I will add, that I would suggest to any band starting out is this:

**Develop personal connections.** Talk to people. Get to know their names. Ask them what they thought. Get an email address or something to build contacts.

Think about this...

You go out and see five bands on a night. You're lucky to remember any of their names, never mind anything they actually did. (hint: make sure in your performance that you have a visual and say your band name a few times so that they DO remember your band name!! I saw one band once open for a recording act who just killed. I watched their entire set, and even at the end of the set, I had no idea who they were. Guess I won't be seeing THEM again, save for a lucky break....)

What people WILL remember is someone they met and had a chance to connect with. Hand them a sticker or a button or something that they can take home so they don't get out to the parking lot and say, "who were they again?"

But if they like your band, and more importantly, like YOU, you just might have a fan. Ask that person at the end of the night what they remember, and it WILL be you and it WILL be your band.

Any successful business knows that customer service is very important.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#22
Quote by axemanchris
Man, you're asking the forum a question and then arguing with people who have years of experience in this sort of thing.

I just want my main question answered. Not the possible question within my question. I like straight up answers, not "well instead of worrying about A1, worry about A2". It's not as if I've never been on a stage before, but it was mostly cover songs and freeform jams.
Quote by axemanchris

Well, when IS your first gig? I mean, if you're expressing worry about how to make an impact, it must be *reasonably* close, no?


Not quite yet. When we are ready, my other bandmates, who are a bit older and more experianced with the business side than me, do have connections within the scene I just like being prepared. I'm only 19 and they're in their Early to Mid-Twenties, but they aren't really songwriters. Except our drummer, but he's more of an arranger as he doesn't play a tonal insrument. The rhthymn guitarist dabbles in it, but he's not as confident because he thinks he lost his "powers" (coulda fooled me) but I'm the only songwriter for lack of a better word.

Quote by axemanchris
If it sounds complete without vocals, then why add vocals? Won't the vocals just compete with the melodic interest that is already there? Or are they really not all that complete sounding, which is why you chose to add vocals?
My guess would be the latter, not because I know anything about you specifically, but because I know a lot about how bands develop.

They do sound complete. I write everything instrumentally to make sure that its as tight as possible so that maybe I can find a vocal melody. I've been working on those and they do sound quite alright to me


Quote by axemanchris

Rehearsing is doing them the same way every time until they're perfect. If you're still writing them, one has to assume that they are not yet written (basic logic), which means that they are in the process of developing and being refined. In other words, at this point, you are probably NOT playing them exactly the same way twice. This is not rehearsing.

Totally incorrect. We are vert tight as a unit. We are all quite seasoned musicians who know how to write and practice and play with others. What I meant is that as we write/finish them, then we add them into the rotation. The songs are finished,even without vocals, as strange as it may seem to you all.

With the vocals, we wrote the songs without vocal parts, so the instrumentation kind of took over. We weighed our options and did a few VERY awkward vocal auditions. It was only recently that me and the other guitarist decided to do vocals, me doing cleans and him doing the harsh vocals. If we had to do the set without vocals, It would probably still have worked. While we do want to be as successful as possible, we do understand that we are a metal band.
I say "jazzpopwhateverelseIsaid" because I, as the principal songwriter, am very influenced by pop like Paramore and Tokio Hotel, Jazz like George Benson and Les Paul, and Prog like Protest the Hero and BTBAM, so the music that I write by myself isn't super heavy nor overly melodic. The songs aren't long and the Progressive aspect is more apparent in song structure. But I make it a point to include as many of my influences as possible before it sounds like patchwork
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#23
Sorry, then. I rescind. I have no idea what I'm talking about.



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.