#1
Hey all

I need some advice. I am going to record some bass tracks for 4 songs as well as 2 different guitars for each of them and create drum tracks in Toontrack Superior Drummer VST. I have Reaper and Sonar for recording. My questions are as follows:

1. Should I record everything in Sonar and mix it there or is it possible (and it is definately easier) to record each track in Reaper then import their .wav files in to sonar to mix them?

2. When mixing the tracks where should each instrument fall? As in (and yes I am knew to this part of recording lol) the frequencies each instrument fits into, if that makes sense.

3. How do I leave space in the mix to add vocals seperately? I don't have a singer yet and do not wish to have my songs only made as instrumentals after the amount of work I have put into writing them to have vocals lol.

Thankyou to everyone who helps in advance
My Guitars:
Epiphone Flying V
Westfield SG
Laney Lc15110 230 G Tube Combo 15W
Presonus Audiobox USB

check out http://soundcloud.com/
eddiechance
#2
here's a good site that explain how to get a decent mix. http://www.recordingeq.com/Subscribe/tip/tascam.htm

edit: but still you'll need to use your ear to get want you really want. This site only explain what frequencies does on each instrument. Don't fear to try thing. Oh and don't get discourage if it takes you a lot of time, getting a good mix takes time.
Last edited by truiteleague at Mar 13, 2012,
#3
Unfortunately, a lot of this depends on the song and the band etc.

1) It's entirely up to you which you prefer recording in - at this stage, you are unlikely to notice any difference in audio quality between DAW's, and the differences are so minute that even a trained professional would generally only notice differences between DAW's when comparing how they differ at the summing stage on the master bus, as the different algorithms used by the top DAW's all impart their own characteristics... they are, as already mentioned, hard to spot without knowing what to listen for though and no typical consumer would ever spot the differences.

2) Again, hard to say as there are many things that affect it, but generally speaking the 'weight' of the bass guitar and the kick drum is found between 50-120Hz ish, with anything below 50Hz adding more of a rumble that is less audible and more of a perception (especially as many speakers will struggle this low, regardless of what the manufacturers try to claim!). For me, and in many metal mixes, the kick will then have most of the 150-500Hz region scooped out, as this can be a bit woolly and warm for the fast double kicks in most metal, and there is usually little more than bass guitar warmth, and the sibillance of vocals up until about 400Hz where the guitars start to shine through... a lot of people will high-pass filter the guitars from 150Hz ish in metal, to leave space for the bass and get a more cutting tone, as the low end of guitars is often best kept low in the mix to help the bass gel with the guitars. 500Hz-1.5kHz is the difficult 'vocals fighting guitars' region where you may have to sculpt the EQ shapes to let them happily coexist, although panning the guitars out wide often reduces this problem (except in mono playback, so beware ignoring this if you plan on having your songs played back through mobile phones/small iPod docks etc. as they have fook all stereo image). Above there, it's the gritty distortion for guitars, and presence for vocals, before you start to reach the 'air' levels above 7.5kHz where there is little to be physically heard other than the drum overheads and snare rattle/kick impact.
You'll also find the crack of most snares between 450-600Hz, and the impact of many drums is repeated at intervals based on their fundamental, usually at 2kHz, 4kHz and 8kHz is where you can easily get a good 'click' of impact without having to search too hard for the exact frequencies. Anything more specific than that is very genre-specific.

3) Space for vocals is not about volume, but about intelligent use of the main mixing tools: panning, EQ, compression and depth (through reverbs and delays etc.). Automation can also help.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#4
Thank you so much guys . I will be startingthe long and grueling mixing process the week after next so expect a couple of threads about me having a meltdown or maybe even a triumph over the next few weeks lol. I will also post the results for feedback as they come.
My Guitars:
Epiphone Flying V
Westfield SG
Laney Lc15110 230 G Tube Combo 15W
Presonus Audiobox USB

check out http://soundcloud.com/
eddiechance
#6
When you're EQ'ing, one of my favourite corrective EQ methods is to set up a low quality parametric EQ and sweep either the bottom or the top to find the frequency you want to eliminate, works like a charm. Remember that you don't need to use all 4 bands and the golden rule:

If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
#7
Il keep tyat rule in mind :-) thnks guys for all your advice and help
My Guitars:
Epiphone Flying V
Westfield SG
Laney Lc15110 230 G Tube Combo 15W
Presonus Audiobox USB

check out http://soundcloud.com/
eddiechance