#1
I've been playing gigs with a 5 watt marshall class 5...it gets over the drums easily and I played a 120-170 person crowd with my volume on half way cuz it was too loud...I guess my question is will it fill an indoor track size venue with enough sound to be heard?
#2
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#6
Quote by jrenkert
I've been playing gigs with a 5 watt marshall class 5...it gets over the drums easily and I played a 120-170 person crowd with my volume on half way cuz it was too loud...I guess my question is will it fill an indoor track size venue with enough sound to be heard?


not likely. that is way to much space for an amp that small to fill. i would hope that you will have a PA there and mic it. agree that your drummer needs to go to the gym (unless he plays wire brush jazz). what kind of music are you guys playing?
#7
Quote by 667
Your drummer needs to hit the gym.

LOLOLOLOLO!!
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#8
Quote by 667
Your drummer needs to hit the gym.

No, I think he needs to hit his drums. I think that may be the problem here.
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#9
If it keeps up with the drummer then it will be ok anywhere, venue size is irrelevant. If the drummer is loud enough for the venue and you can keep up with him then you will be loud enough too won't you? If he's not loud enough then he'll be miked - and so will you.
How do people not get this simple concept? The drummer sets the volume - not the venue.
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#11
....You're 5-watt amp was louder than the PA?
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#12
Ok, the only thing going into the PA was the singer and that makes more sense. I would deff think your drummer will be miked, and then youwill be too.
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#13
Quote by 667
Your drummer needs to hit the gym.


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#14
The idea of playing with a 5-watt amp baffles me. I mean, I use a 50 watt head and a 100 watt head. And my friends' band has used more than 4 amps (between two guys- they're a three piece) and 5 cabs at a time.
#16
You sir, are ridiculous.
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#17
Quote by jrenkert
We play rock and roll and the drums are plenty loud...i had to turn down cuz the PA couldnt be any louder...

here is the gig in question:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymKn8XXwmF0

That sounded pretty cool. I realize that was a vid cam and youtube but the mix sounded pretty good the way it was. You were a tad too loud. It was the bassist that I couldn't hear.

But pretty much what Cathbard said is what you should follow. There is no way any of us on the internet can predict the outcome for you. Being in an open air environment with more human bodies to project through will certainly make a difference. 10 people standing in front of a stage/speakers is much different than 1,000. The human body is made mostly of water which absorb sound waves. That is why I bring that up.

If you are wondering about playing at your High School track or something then my suggestion is get permission to go out there and run a rehearsal. Set your gear up including the PA if you are going to use it and have some friends stand on the opposite side and report back.

Last edited by 311ZOSOVHJH at Mar 15, 2012,
#18
All you can hope to do really is to get a good on-stage mix. FOH is the job of the PA. Any variations to your onstage sound necessary to project to the audience is done by the PA.
In small venues you normally have to be louder than on a big stage because you are physically closer to the drummer. This is counter intuitive if you are focusing on what is going to FOH directly off the amp. That is because you are neglecting the fact that the volume of the band is totally controlled by the volume of your drummer. You are his bitch, like it or not.
The correct question is "can you keep up with your drummer?" If not then you will have to rely on foldback to hear yourself which is something most gigging guitarists learn to hate with a passion. Forget about FOH, if you keep up with your drummer then that will all work out for itself and the sound guy can tweak it from there if necessary.
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#19
A 5 watt tube amp, boosted till the ****er is like breaking pretty much, should be able to play a stadium.

Fun.


I recommend getting a little powers PA monitor wedge for yourself, so you can choose your own amount of stage presence.

Always wanted something like that.....
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Last edited by DeathByDestroyr at Mar 15, 2012,
#21
I have an extremely hard time believing your drummer can hear you adequately with only 5w. My issue isn't the volume going to the crowd, with the amp a bit away from the drummer, pointed opposite from him, I don't see why it wouldn't be decent enough for smaller shows, but having played that amp several times, and fully cranking it all the way up; either your drummer barely taps his cymbals and drums, he has super-human hearing, or he's just playing the beat and hoping you're keeping up. I've played drums in several bands, most recently being a rock band similar to yours, and I have to have the other guitarist turn up his 100w tube head, which is faced toward me, nearly halfway up to even hope to hear him, and I don't even hit that hard....
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#22
Drums are loud, and they surround you.

I don't think most drummers expect to be able to hear you much. I know don't.
#23
I wouldn't go onstage with an amp that wasn't capable of blasting over the drums if you tried. ie, a little in reserve. Some stages can be a real pita. I still ALWAYS mike the amp up as well - otherwise how can you tweak the FOH mix? But screw having to rely on foldback, That sucks to hell. You can feed a bit extra to the drummer too that way if he wants. Still, I never go on stage without at least a 50W amp behind me.
You never know what sort of mood your drummer will be in that night. He may be angry and pounding them to death or he may be too stoned to hit them hard at all. Gotta have all the bases covered.
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#24
I used to always have to crank my amp up considerably to hear myself. And I was standing 3 feet in front of my cab. I also had the crash cymbal about 2 feet from me at practice. It was pretty cramped. So yeah... if you're close to the kit, you'll need serious volume. Those cymbals tend to drown out everything when you're right on top of them. But outdoors you'll also have problems projecting due to the fact that all that sound isn't going to reflect off of anything. It's just gonna go out there and die off. A practical example would be to play some music in your house, then go outside and play at the same volume. It'll most likely sound quieter. If you're playing outside you really NEED to be going through a PA. But IMO you NEED a PA for a 5w amp at any venue. TBH, I'm amazed that you've managed to gig without miking your amp. Drums are loud and stuff.
Quote by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
#25
I find the disbelief in that poor 5 watt amp a tid bit sad (I mean i know its just a little guy and the gig I posted was just showing what it can do)...I mean the one person who cited the gig said I was too loud...at maybe 2/3 volume (I had to emergency tweak my tone to get what i wanted)? and yes my drummer is talented all be it skinny...from what i gather from the collective opinion...size only matters for onstage volume otherwise the crowd is fed from the PA...is that correct?
#26
Quote by jrenkert
I find the disbelief in that poor 5 watt amp a tid bit sad (I mean i know its just a little guy and the gig I posted was just showing what it can do)...I mean the one person who cited the gig said I was too loud...at maybe 2/3 volume (I had to emergency tweak my tone to get what i wanted)? and yes my drummer is talented all be it skinny...from what i gather from the collective opinion...size only matters for onstage volume otherwise the crowd is fed from the PA...is that correct?

I watched the video. It seems to me that your drummer doesn't play very hard (not a bad thing, but it will make him quieter), and he gets off tempo. This could be from not hearing you, having issues with tempo in general, or me being anal.

And if you're being mic'ed, and you have monitors, and you have a good soundman, then you can play with whatever size of amp you want. However, in my time playing live, I have never been in a situation where all three of these elements worked out perfectly (Which is why I will never gig without a tube amp with at least 20 watts. At least 50 by the time I settle on an amp).

And for the love of god, the phrase is "albeit", not "all be it."
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#27
Quote by jrenkert
We play rock and roll and the drums are plenty loud...i had to turn down cuz the PA couldnt be any louder...

here is the gig in question:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymKn8XXwmF0


Those pink pajama pants are ridiculous.

The rest of it was great. Nice job.
#28
Quote by jrenkert
I find the disbelief in that poor 5 watt amp a tid bit sad (I mean i know its just a little guy and the gig I posted was just showing what it can do)...I mean the one person who cited the gig said I was too loud...at maybe 2/3 volume (I had to emergency tweak my tone to get what i wanted)? and yes my drummer is talented all be it skinny...from what i gather from the collective opinion...size only matters for onstage volume otherwise the crowd is fed from the PA...is that correct?

Yes, but even then you can feed some of the guitar back through the foldback. Like many other guys, I hate relying on foldback, it's too unreliable. If a venue is going to cut costs anywhere you can bet it will be foldback. And if there's anything the sound guy will neglect it's foldback mix - because he can't hear it. It can get really frustrating to have to throw beer cans at him to get his attention. It can be worth buying your own foldback setup before you even buy a full PA. That doesn't solve the sound guy problem, for that you need to have your own sound guy really.
I'm one of those guys that likes to pull crazy sustain via feedback and that takes a big rig to do properly. 50W at least and preferrably a 4x12. But that's another story altogether.
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#29
Quote by souperman08

And for the love of god, the phrase is "albeit", not "all be it."


I wont make the mistake again soon
#30
Quote by 667
Those pink pajama pants are ridiculous.

The rest of it was great. Nice job.


Its a long story..
#31
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
Drums are loud, and they surround you.

I don't think most drummers expect to be able to hear you much. I know don't.


Most your posts I typically agree with, but this one not so much. Every drummer I have ever worked with wants to clearly hear both the lead guitar and bass. I imagine that its like the old saying " the left arm doesn't know what the right arm is doing" If any one of the band members has trouble hearing the other, I feel like the cohesiveness of the music is right out the window.

TS, I commend you on your ability to make it work, but I am skeptical still.
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#32
Quote by jrenkert
Its a long story..



Ya, you'd get yelled at if you posted it here. And if you posted it in the pit, you'd get ridiculed for life.. Ud forever be known as "Fancy Fingers".
#33
The other guitar player in my band hooked up his Class 5 to his Fender Twin Reverb reissue one day (meaning he used the TR's speakers). It sounded good but he said he couldn't give it any more power (so it's a no go for gigging). When he tried using the Class 5 on its own he was totally overpowered by the rest of us.

Yeah I would say either your band is on the quiet side or at least your drummer is. Very nice performance btw.
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#34
Quote by 667
Ya, you'd get yelled at if you posted it here. And if you posted it in the pit, you'd get ridiculed for life.. Ud forever be known as "Fancy Fingers".


I feel like that I could live with Fancy Fingers as a nickname.
#35
Quote by RGallagherFan
The other guitar player in my band hooked up his Class 5 to his Fender Twin Reverb reissue one day (meaning he used the TR's speakers). It sounded good but he said he couldn't give it any more power (so it's a no go for gigging). When he tried using the Class 5 on its own he was totally overpowered by the rest of us.

Yeah I would say either your band is on the quiet side or at least your drummer is. Very nice performance btw.


Thank you for the compliment! We are mindful of the capabilities of our equipment and my drummer is very aware of volume level. My main concern would be playing outside or in this upcoming gymnasium gig thing...we aren't the main event or anything just a little side entertainment while other stuff is going on..so mic'd through a PA I feel as if the little guy has a fighting chance. At least thats what I've gathered from the consensus here..I do have a nasty vox valvetronix 100 watt combo if I HAVE to use it..
#37
Mic your amp and give the drummer foldback of your guitar, then you just have to give yourself enough to balance out with the drums for your own ears. This is how I usually run things and my drummer rarely complains. From there let FOH sort out the rest. Playing bigger venues, you only need to worry about your onstage sound and mix, everything else is for FOH to worry about. And once foldbacks are set, they shouldn't touch your onstage sound unless you guys tell them to.