#1
Hey guys,

Ive been practicing my jazz chords for the past couple of days and focusing on chord progressions to get away from scale playing.

I went back to lead guitar today, and i aint as fast as i was before i started practicing these chords non stop...

Is this normal? whats going on with my hand??
#2
whenever you stop practicing one thing for a period of time your skills fade, all you need to do is try to add your old licks to your practice time...
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#3
they died man.

also there's a lot more than speed involved. keep up the practice, but start getting away from scales. if you can read music, i recommend getting the berklee method books -- that shit will whip you into shape.

if you can't read music, i recommend getting them even more.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
so is guitar playing like working out to build muscle?


If i dont use a certain skill will fade away?

#5
Quote by IbanezMan989
so is guitar playing like working out to build muscle?


If i dont use a certain skill will fade away?



most everything in life is like that. language is certainly like that. and yes, working out is like that.

just do a little bit every day or couple of days to keep it alive.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
Read my sig.

You have to practice at least a little bit of everything, every day to stay at performance standard.
If I miss one day of practice, I notice it.
If I miss two days, the critics notice it.
If I miss three days, the audience notices it.

Ingacy Jan Paderewski (1860 - 1941)
Last edited by Quintex at Mar 15, 2012,
#7
A few days really shouldn't have that much affect on your playing ability. However a couple of months, yeah it starts lessening.

I'd guess that you're either at a very beginner level, or you're actually listening to yourself. Both these would suggest a difference in level or perceived level after a couple of days.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#8
Quote by Quintex
Read my sig.

You have to practice at least a little bit of everything, every day to stay at performance standard.


I don't buy that at all. I often times take 1-2 day breaks and come back playing better than I did before the break. I don't think such a small break should hurt that much. Even when taking long breaks, it always comes back to me just like riding a bicycle.

If it really affects you that much though just mix in your lead and rhythm practice.
#9
Quote by jimicrackcorn
I don't buy that at all. I often times take 1-2 day breaks and come back playing better than I did before the break.

+1 Happens to me all the time with technique driven stuff. Especially legato.
#11
I find when I'm doing muscle/endurance intensive things like chords or something, my linear playing diminishes.
I always equated it to building muscle, therefore they get stiffer.
Do some simple finger stretches before going back to lead playing.
You could just be fatigued from all those A7 b9#11 voices you're practicing
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
#12
learning jazz chords...learn the arpeggios of the chords and mix them with some runs that you already know and make some melodic runs with them..find the same chord, arp and run on another string set..see if you can "bridge" the two positions with runs you already know..your ability to be comfortable in any fretboard position is important to confidence in playing what you want and with that your speed will increase as you practice more

learn as many inversions of the chords as you can and play them in all 12 keys or as many as you can...do the above suggestions in as many keys as you can...the fretboard will open up to you in many different ways...

play well

wolf