#1
Hi, I'm using 0.42-0.09 string gauge and I regularly tune my guitar to Drop C#. However, I recently read this thing saying that to get a better quality sound when drop tuning, use a thicker string gauge. Can somebody please verify this and explain why this will produce a better sound.

Thanks guys. (:

P.S: Please can you give me an idea on what gauge I should re-string with?
#2
I have a pretty good idea that I might be wrong but a thicker string will have more tension when it is tuned to lower allowing for the string to not be loose or feel like it is all over the fretboard. Thicker strings will generally have more tension and require more effort to bend, seeing as how they are thicker. For C# tuning try using 11s or maybe even 12s, 9s will probably feel too loose. Also it depends on the scale of your neck. Once again, there is probably someone on here who can explain this way better.
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#3
I'd use .11-.52s for drop C# but since you're currently using nines thatch be quite a big and unnecessary leap that can put strain on your fingers muscles when bending because of the extra tension that thicker string provide. Because of this, a hybrid gauge set (or most commonly called light bottom - heavy top) will be best for you. In case you don't know, that mix gauges of 10-52).

Thicker string are better for lower turnings because the extra tension provides a tighter and lessuddy sound when drop tuning.
#4
You cannot be serious, surely using nines for drop C# is like stringing the guitar with spaghetti?
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#5
Quote by RetroGunslinger
You cannot be serious, surely using nines for drop C# is like stringing the guitar with spaghetti?

Which is precisely why I posted this, You see I didn't even realise I was doing the wrong thing until I read about it.
There's an old saying that goes, "If you can't say something positive, then don't say it at all."
#6
Quote by BVBKilljoy
Which is precisely why I posted this, You see I didn't even realise I was doing the wrong thing until I read about it.
There's an old saying that goes, "If you can't say something positive, then don't say it at all."

good luck with that statement. this is the internet.
#7
Quote by RetroGunslinger
using nines for drop C# is like stringing the guitar with spaghetti?


Sigged

@TS: i use 11-54's for drop C
Quote by RetroGunslinger
using nines for drop C# is like stringing the guitar with spaghetti


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Last edited by Tunder250 at Mar 15, 2012,
#8
There's not much point to doing something just because someone says it's wrong. I would never dream of using such small strings, but it seems like you aren't really sure why you should. So if you don't feel the need to, there isn't really a need to.

To answer your question though, more tension usually equates to a fuller, warmer sound, and less buzzing. High tension gives you tighter strings, which can be nicer to play depending on the player. But such things are totally subjective.

If you just want to try it out, 11-49 or 10-52 would be a good gauge.
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#9
i used super slinky 9's for the longest time in drop c. i just recently bought d'addario strings that are made for drop c, and the sound quality improved 10x. i also thought that d'addario strings were expensive, but at guitar center they are 10$ for three packs, cheaper than ernie balls.
#10
Quote by Tunder250
Sigged

@TS: i use 11-54's for drop C


Finally sigged, victory is mine!
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#11
More mids and bass response, tightness and overall tonality with thicker strings in general. Less buzzing as well, provided action and truss rod is set correctly.
#12
Quote by RetroGunslinger
You cannot be serious, surely using nines for drop C# is like stringing the guitar with spaghetti?


Drop C# isnt that low the low # will be flubby, but the rest is effectively in D# minus the low D#. Which should be perfectly fine with 9's on a 25.5'' scale.

IMO TS should get something like 10-48 or 10-52. That should be fine. 12's in drop C# will be hard as hell to play, since its almost like playing in Eb/D# with 12's except for the 6th string.

I would personally use 12's for playing in C standard on a 25.5'' scale with an FR. Thats my current setup on my main guitar in fact, with my other one in drop G# with 14's.

Quote by Offworld92
There's not much point to doing something just because someone says it's wrong. I would never dream of using such small strings, but it seems like you aren't really sure why you should. So if you don't feel the need to, there isn't really a need to.

To answer your question though, more tension usually equates to a fuller, warmer sound, and less buzzing. High tension gives you tighter strings, which can be nicer to play depending on the player. But such things are totally subjective.

If you just want to try it out, 11-49 or 10-52 would be a good gauge.



What this guy says.

Also, thicker strings add bass in high tunings, but it reduces bass in low. Paradoxical, it sounds, but thats exactly what happens in my experience- thicker strings cut out muddiness in a low tuning, and add clarity.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Mar 15, 2012,