#1
Hey everyone

I posted yesterday with the same problem, but in was in the wrong board and I didn't get that much help, so i decided to post again. So, i had been playing with a setup I really liked (fairly high) since i got my Gibson ES-339 a year ago. Yesterday my guitar teacher had a look at my guitar and offered to set my neck straight and lower the setup a bit. I knew it was quite bowed so i thought why not. But when i played with the guitar the same evening i noticed that the setup was too low for me and that the G string buzzed all the way, and all the strings sounded really dull and dead when playing on the high frets. I thought i'd fix the problem by raising the action a bit and bowing the neck again, but the problem only got worse and I don't know what to do anymore, so here I am.

A real bummer, any thoughts guys?
"Everybody must get stoned!" - Bob Dylan


Last edited by fanjeera at Mar 15, 2012,
#2
on a side note, all the frets ar at the same hight so the eliminates one cause

any help would be greatly appriciated
"Everybody must get stoned!" - Bob Dylan


#3
It sounds like your string is fretting out because it's too low. You probably just need to raise your bridge a bit.
#4
but that's the weird part. I slacked the neck so it's really bowed and i raised the bridge so currently the setup is impossibly high but the strings still buzz, especially on the high frets (starting from the 15th)
"Everybody must get stoned!" - Bob Dylan


#5
Take it to someone who knows what they are doing, which apparently neither you nor your guitar teacher do, before you screw up what it a pretty damn nice guitar.

Then the next time your guitar teacher offers to do anything other than teach, hit him/her/it with a bat...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#6
so there really is nothing i can really do? Because i don't have much money for a tech :/
"Everybody must get stoned!" - Bob Dylan


#7
The neck should be bowed AWAY from the strings "in the middle". The amount of bow will set the clearance from the frets towards the tuning pegs. The bridge height also affects this, but also changes the distance from the frets to the strings "up high" -> above the 12th fret or so.

Whatever you do, do NOT make big changes to the neck truss rod. Only a quarter turn at a time, and wait at least an hour for the neck to change. Overtightening will break the truss rod, and can break the neck itself (rare, but I have had to replace one or two over the years!).

Make sure your pickups are not hitting the strings. To lower them, rotate the screws counter-clockwise a bit and try again. Don't go too far or the screws may come out, the springs might get lost, and you will not be happy!
#8
luckily i haven't tightened the neck yet, only loosened. hope that won't damage it that much. but it's odd that it the muting only gets bad at the high end
"Everybody must get stoned!" - Bob Dylan


#9
Quote by fanjeera
so there really is nothing i can really do? Because i don't have much money for a tech :/


No, there are a lot of things you CAN do, but it's pretty apparent that there's nothing you know HOW to do.

I'm not trying to offend you, just save you some potentially serious grief.

Setting up a guitar isn't particularly hard, but it's something you need to take the time to learn properly.

You've got a $2000+ guitar, don't ruin it for $50...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#10
Quote by Arby911
No, there are a lot of things you CAN do, but it's pretty apparent that there's nothing you know HOW to do.

I'm not trying to offend you, just save you some potentially serious grief.

Setting up a guitar isn't particularly hard, but it's something you need to take the time to learn properly.

You've got a $2000+ guitar, don't ruin it for $50...



Allright, suppose it's something that i could've figured out myself, but you know it's my first time dealing with something like this.
Thanks a bunch!
"Everybody must get stoned!" - Bob Dylan