#1
If i have an effects pedal that runs only on 9v batteries, could i install an outlet for an ac adapter?

Sorry, I don't know the name of the part but its the circular hole in most pedals that your adapters plug into.

I attached a picture of what im talking about if my babbling hasnt worked
Attachments:
ds1.png
Fender MIM Stratocaster
Epiphone Explorer
Ovation 2071 Ultra
1989 Fender Stage 185
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Electro-Harmonix LPB-1
Dunlop Crybaby Wah
Boss DS-1, OD-2, CH-1
Digitech RP90
#3
well the little sticker next to it says 9v DC only, so no, you just need a plug that converts it they're like 15-$20
#4
Quote by csensesfail92
well the little sticker next to it says 9v DC only, so no, you just need a plug that converts it they're like 15-$20


They would work, but would get terrible hum. Seriously, unusable hum.

You need to know which wires go to the battery terminal and the ground. You'll need to add a wire from the jack to where the power used to go to on the circuit board from the battery. You also need to know whether the pedal has a positive ground or not, like the old fuzz faces, and other pnp pedals.

Those jacks are called 2.1mm dc jacks

Here it is for the negative (normal) ground. Thats the input jack ring in this one.


The positive ground (usually) requires a different power supply to work properly, but I can find you a layout for that too if you want it.
Was lacking a decent sig. Still is.
Last edited by Speckled_Hen at Mar 16, 2012,
#5
you can get an atachment from diff companys like Godlyke that have a variety of adapter that plug in the end of the standard DC power suply. You might even beable to find it a a store like Radio Shack/Graybar or any other electrical diy store.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#6
Maybe I missed something but that DS-1 isn't the pedal he wants and adapter for. He wants to add a DC jack to a pedal that only uses batteries.
Now, yes, this can be done BUT:
What pedal is it? Some pedals are positive ground and most are negative ground. My gut tells me that since they didn't add a DC jack that it might be positive ground.

Now you can add a DC jack to a pedal that has positive ground but it will need it's own power supply. You couldn't daisy chain it with negative ground pedals.

Edit: Whoops! I just echoed Speckled_Hen's response. Pain medication....ki...ck....ing.....in. Sorry.
Last edited by Griffin Effects at Mar 17, 2012,
#7
Quote by Griffin Effects
Maybe I missed something but that DS-1 isn't the pedal he wants and adapter for. He wants to add a DC jack to a pedal that only uses batteries.
Now, yes, this can be done BUT:
What pedal is it? Some pedals are positive ground and most are negative ground. My gut tells me that since they didn't add a DC jack that it might be positive ground.

Now you can add a DC jack to a pedal that has positive ground but it will need it's own power supply. You couldn't daisy chain it with negative ground pedals.

Edit: Whoops! I just echoed Speckled_Hen's response. Pain medication....ki...ck....ing.....in. Sorry.


Or if he is adding a 9V DC adapter to it, he could just put a bridge rectifier between the 9V signal in and the ground. As long as you then connect the output of the bridge rectifier properly then you will get the correct polarity voltage from any adapter. Schotkky diodes will give you a low enough voltage drop that you likely won't hear much difference with your pedals.

Also very useful if you accidentally plug an adapter that outputs AC into the pedal.
#9
Quote by Griffin Effects
Maybe I missed something but that DS-1 isn't the pedal he wants and adapter for. He wants to add a DC jack to a pedal that only uses batteries.
Now, yes, this can be done BUT:
What pedal is it? Some pedals are positive ground and most are negative ground. My gut tells me that since they didn't add a DC jack that it might be positive ground.

Now you can add a DC jack to a pedal that has positive ground but it will need it's own power supply. You couldn't daisy chain it with negative ground pedals.

Edit: Whoops! I just echoed Speckled_Hen's response. Pain medication....ki...ck....ing.....in. Sorry.

I forgot to mention the Godlyke adapter has an attach ment that plugs to the batery clips for the 9V, but attaches to the end of the normal DC adapter cable

Sorry I did not make that clear in my first post.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#11
Quote by Papabear505


$3.00

Thanks, I can not upload pictures to save my life!
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#12
I've never seen one of those adaptors before, snazzy.

I end up repeating people responses all the time, don't worry
Was lacking a decent sig. Still is.
#13
Quote by Robbgnarly
I forgot to mention the Godlyke adapter has an attach ment that plugs to the batery clips for the 9V, but attaches to the end of the normal DC adapter cable

Sorry I did not make that clear in my first post.


That would work also BUT if the pedal was positive ground, it would need it's own power supply.

It would sure help if we knew what pedal we were dealing with.
#14
what u could do if your limited to using an AC adapter after u install the plug is just rip apart the ac adapter cable, and reverse the polarity....

worked for me :P
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