#1
Hey guys !

ive been playing lead for a bit now and working with playing over songs for awhile to add some flavor to it and lil solos on the bridge and what not.


I have never really sit down, and studied any licks or anything.

should i really learn some?

I could pass right now in a solo if i had too, but im always wanting to get better. Would learning licks have a significant enough impact on my skill to actually take time and learn some for about 2 weeks?
#4
Find some cover songs that you dig, and listen close to the solos. Specifically listen for catchy licks, bends, flourishes, etc. that really pop out. Then learn those. Make mental note of what key those licks are in and where they are played on the fretboard.

Transpose those licks or solo chunks into key of choice by sliding it up or down the fretboard.

Think of your development of these licks as modular assemblies. You can join together these modular assemblies in the proper key to make a full solo. A quick scale run can join them together, or a slide on the fretboard up to a root note are just a couple of the easy tools you can use to fit them together.

A solo can almost become like cutting and pasting different licks together to form a composition.

This would be a good place to start.
#5
Honestly, yeah, I think you should learn anything you find interesting by other players and integrate and adapt it into your playing. There's also a whole bunch of licks you should just know if you're going to be a rock guitar player - the standard pentatonic vocabulary.
#6
Quote by IbanezMan989
Hey guys !

ive been playing lead for a bit now and working with playing over songs for awhile to add some flavor to it and lil solos on the bridge and what not.


I have never really sit down, and studied any licks or anything.

should i really learn some?

I could pass right now in a solo if i had too, but im always wanting to get better. Would learning licks have a significant enough impact on my skill to actually take time and learn some for about 2 weeks?


I would suggest learning entire solos. play them, memorize them, study them if you have the background. I would spend some serious quality time here before actually trying to improvise.
shred is gaudy music
#9
it depends if you want to actually improvise or if you want to fake it.
if you want to fake it learn a bunch of licks in every key and practice playing them over the right chords (theres nothing wrong with doing this).
if you want to improvise train your ears (sing intervals, drill intervals, sing scales in different patterns and eventually incorperate chromatic notes) and brain to hear and understand what you want to do in different harmonic situations (for example, take four bars of a song, practice playing the root, third, fifth and seventh of each chord all up and down the neck, then practice improvising in whole, half quarter notes etc. then work on singing phrases to yourself out of time and playing them), the kinds of sounds you want and how to get them. learning other people's solos that you like can be a part of this, if you do it for the purpose of analysis (as in figuring out what kinds of sounds and phrases you tend to be drawn to, and what that person is doing) but not regurgitation, but memorizing solos you like is probably a pretty good idea (also, learn to sing them with the recording, and it will probably help you more to learn them by ear rather then from tab). if theres a particular player you like a lot, it might be good to learn an entire album of their solos, as a lot of guys re-use vocabulary, and eventually you will become very quick at recognizing their phrases, and after learning a ton of music you'll become quick at recognizing stuff in general, which will help you a lot when it comes time to improvise.
if you really want to practice licks pick a lick you want, and practice singing it over a bunch of different chords, this will help get it into your vocabulary and into your ears, rather then just teaching your hands to play it.
/preachy
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Mar 19, 2012,
#10
Quote by IbanezMan989
do you guys have a good first full solo in mind i could learn?


It's really hard to give advice here without knowing what music you love. The first few solos you learn note-for-note are likely going to be pretty hard for you to figure out, so you want to pick stuff you love.

That being said, I think going out to "learn licks" is not that important when it comes to learning how to create a great solo. While fancy licks get a lot of attentoin, they are not what makes a solo great: the melody of the solo is.

So you need to develop your ability to write a melody. One key to that is to develop your ear. In addition to TehRealCaptain's advice, I'd say download the functional ear trainer from Miles.Be, and get a good book on ear training. When you learn a solo, put in the extra time to learn it by ear, rather than looking up tabs.