#1
For the past year I was constantly playing exercises related to alternate picking, sweeping, legato, and tapping stuff. My technique has improved, but I haven't learnt so many songs, during that time. I have no problem with learning, I just spend most time on exercises, and I felt boring, than, one month ago I started to practice technique through real songs, but I become to bores me to do one solo lick for a more than 20 minutes straight 16th notes. Should I just rest from the technical exercises for a while and start to learn more songs? But consider that I want to achieve very high technical ablilty (I play mosty metal).
and one more (maybe ) offtopic question: My teacher told me that I need to practice more funky stuff, and other genres, chords etc. My knowledge of chords is descent, but when I play jazz or some pop, or playing some chords, I don't feel that pleasure while playing metal. Should I bother playing other styles even if I'm not interested in them?
#2
I was in the same case of you, I spent more time on exercises than learning songs/improvisation/new style etc...

One day, I decided to change it, so I reversed : I spend more time on songs than exercises.
And it really changed all ...

Of course, if you do exercises, you must be sur that these exercises are very efficient and are on a specific problem (string crossing etc...) if not ... it would be useless.

So do both, but you MUST always HAVE FUN with your guitar.
That's what I think.
"Sans la musique, la vie serait une erreur" Nietzsche
#3
Quote by kimi_page
...Should I bother playing other styles even if I'm not interested in them?



I believe you should develop an interest in as many styles as you can find ... from metal to bossa nova to Afropop to Be-Bop to Hawaiian slack-key slide guitar.

You never know what is going to tickle your ear or expand your musical vocabulary. It is also a lot of fun taking a song from one genre and and playing it another.
#4
Play some songs then.

The whole point of practicing is to get better at playing the guitar, but if all you do is practice and you never really actually play the guitar then what's the point? It's like constantly taking driving lessons but never actually going anywhere.

There's no law that says you have to only be working on harder and harder things on the guitar, it's not a competition, it's not as if you're not getting "scored" in some way.

Learn what you want, play what you want. Some people really thrive on intensive practice and woodshedding and get a real buzz out of it, but not everyone does - you certainly don't seem to be at this point in time. So do somethng different, it's a hobby and you're doing out of choice - that means it's supposed to be fun, and sometimes you just have to play the thing.
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#5
For the first question i'd say continue with songs.
Exercises are great if you find that you have a problem with your technique, then you make an exercise that focus on that problem and practice it until you've gotten rid of the problem. I think songs are better for learning though, since then you will learn how to apply these techniques into music.

And most of the great metal players have very challenging licks of different techniques in there solos, they work great for exercises to build your technique.

That's my opinion, i'm sure someone will tell you otherwise. Find out what works best for you.

Moving on to question number two. You don't have to do anything you don't want to. YOU decide what YOU learn. Although imho it is very stupid to be narrowed down to one style. The songs i write range from Hard rock to Deathcore. But i use knowledge i've obtained through other styles of music and knowledge about chords for these styles.

Knowing a lot if different chords and their formulas (Wich notes their built of) can help you come up with really interesting arpeggio sequences in metal. And learning concepts of funk (wich is one of the most complex genres rhythm wise) can help you come up with interesting rhythms and arrangement concepts.

As said though, if you don't want to expand your horizons and look into different genres, It's up to you. But i think a guitarist should try to find more music he likes in different styles to become more of an "over all" musician. Hope i helped, good luck!
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#6
You dont NEED to play excercises. I haven't done daily excercises in like, 6 months or more.

Just play the damn thing, thats why you did that so much anyways.
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#8
Get some place where you can crank it up... (or a good set of headphones) put in a few backing tracks that you like and Apply what you've been working your butt off for

Get up, dance around, just Jam... Do that till your tired of it.. I bet you learn a few tricks and licks by accident..

Then, when you feel like it... Get back to practice...
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#9
Yeah as soon as i get my ass into inpatient treatment, I'm going to work on knowing the major scale backwards, and learning a paganini piece. Until then, really, I'm just jamming out, having fun.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#10
Quote by kimi_page
Should I just rest from the technical exercises for a while and start to learn more songs? But consider that I want to achieve very high technical ablilty (I play mosty metal).?
There are so many things you can do to improve your playing there's not any reason to burn yourself out.
Like others have said leave the exercises alone for a while and work at something you find more enjoyable for now. There's no rules about this.

Recently I just needed a break - and pretty much stopped playing all together except for learning a few songs & solos.
3-4 months later I feel ready to get back into intense practice routines again. (Actually looking forward to it)

Learning and improving at guitar is a life long journey and the road keeps changing. Just stay on it and roll with it and have fun.
Quote by kimi_page
and one more (maybe ) offtopic question: My teacher told me that I need to practice more funky stuff, and other genres, chords etc. My knowledge of chords is descent, but when I play jazz or some pop, or playing some chords, I don't feel that pleasure while playing metal. Should I bother playing other styles even if I'm not interested in them?

It certainly can't hurt. Might even help you become a better musician.
But if you only wish to play metal and nothing else... then do that.
If you become interested in branching out into jazz or whatever, you can always pursue that later on. good luck.