#1
If you have a basic Am chord and you play the single note G over it most people would consider that G note to be unstable correct?

Now my question is what if you played the G note over an Am7 chord. Being that the Am7 chord has the G in it, does the G become stable?

So, basically what I am asking is if unstable scale tones can become stable if they are part of the chord. ( assume you are playing leads over the chord )
#2
If you play a G note over an Am chord you've effectively just turned it into a Am7 chord, and by their very nature 7th chords tend to sound a little unstable and unresolved because the 7th is so close to the tonic.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#3
The whole Am7 chord is 'unstable', because it has a dissonance in it and wants to resolve to D minor. It doesn't matter who plays the G.
If you double that 7th in your solo you're just making this pull to the tonic even stronger.
But it's good since that is the function of the chord.

You just need to pay attention to the function of the chord. If you are playing over the tonic, you should stick to chord tones because every other note would create a bit of tension that you probably don't want at that moment. But over the dominant chord you might want to add some extra tension. You may add something like a 7th or a chromatic leading tone or something even though it's not in the chord, because it makes the effect of the tonic stronger if you are able to resolve to it correctly.
#4
Quote by iidunno
If you have a basic Am chord and you play the single note G over it most people would consider that G note to be unstable correct?

Now my question is what if you played the G note over an Am7 chord. Being that the Am7 chord has the G in it, does the G become stable?

So, basically what I am asking is if unstable scale tones can become stable if they are part of the chord. ( assume you are playing leads over the chord )


I wouldn't consider it to be unstable in the least bit, it would sound melodic. Any Jazz guy will tell you that the most suitable 2 notes to lean on in forming a chord, should you only have 2 notes to play would be the 3rds and 7ths. Why not the root? Because the bass most likely has it covered.

Best,

Sean
#5
A m7 isn't a dissonant sonority at all. What you're talking about is just extending the chord in your melodic choices. That's fine.

The extensions are implied within the key. Unless you're superimposing something altered over a dominant, in which case you'd want it to sound unstable, it's totally typical and fine. Chord tones are always "in" over the chord, what's going to sound unstable is an "out" note - like a G# over an Am7. That's obviously want to resolve upwards by step.
#6
Jazz harmony doesn't use 7ths and other extensions in the traditional sense. They are used more for colour than an expressive harmonic device like you'd find in baroque music for example.

Targeting 7ths as chord tones in jazz works fine, trying to force in a 7-6 suspension over a jazz ii V i isn't going to work well though.
#8
ok thanks for your input everyone. I also have another question.

I know that if you play the A natural minor scale over an Am chord that it would sound minor because of the A root note in the Am chord. ( so you would be effectively playing Am over it).

But now what if you play A natural minor over an Am chord with a C in the bass. Does the A natural minor scale now sound like a C major sounding scale and wanting to resolve to C?
Last edited by iidunno at Mar 18, 2012,
#9
Quote by iidunno
ok thanks for your input everyone. I also have another question.

I know that if you play the A natural minor scale over an Am chord that it would sound minor because of the A root note in the Am chord. ( so you would be effectively playing Am over it).

But now what if you play A natural minor over an Am chord with a C in the bass. Does the A natural minor scale now sound like a C major sounding scale and wanting to resolve to C?

You're thinking too hard. Scales doesn't resolve to specific chords in non-static harmony so much as they resolve to the final tonic at the end of a sequence. Don't think about it so vertically. Think about the motion across the chords as what's guiding the line, not how the tones are necessarily resting over a passing chord.

The scale choice over Am7 and C6 (Am7/C) are identical so I think the investigation should stop there, because it doesn't prove very fruitful to think really hard about "hmm, is the Root C or A..." over a chord that will essentially be treated the same way.
Last edited by chronowarp at Mar 18, 2012,
#10
If you have a basic Am chord and you play the single note G over it most people would consider that G note to be unstable correct?

Eh not really. Am + G = Am7

Now my question is what if you played the G note over an Am7 chord. Being that the Am7 chord has the G in it, does the G become stable?

The G would become a chord tone. Doesn't make much of a difference when it comes to stable vs. unstable.

So, basically what I am asking is if unstable scale tones can become stable if they are part of the chord. ( assume you are playing leads over the chord )

No, the only tone in the major scale considered highly unstable would be the 4, and if the chord is a major11, the chord ITSELF is unstable. 7s are a bit debatable, they create more of a "sweetened" sound to our modern ears than unstable one.
#11
7th chords are unstable. They contain a dissonance.

dissonance = unstable, requiring resolution.
#13
Quote by chronowarp
Not necessarily.


True, but for an overarching theory it works.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#14
You don't have to resolve the dissonance, you can leave it for colour, it's still a dissonance though.
#15
Quote by griffRG7321
You don't have to resolve the dissonance, you can leave it for colour, it's still a dissonance though.

What angle are you trying to come from with this?

I mean. a dom7 can be a pretty stable sonority in a lot of instances, maybe not in baroque or Classical music, but in blues, jazz, and rock...it's fairly common.

A maj7 is pretty "dissonant" but it's a highly consonant ending point in most Jazz. I mean in Jazz, something isn't really even "dissonant" (in that, it demands resolution or is completely unstable) until it has a m9 dissonance inside of it or an altered 5/9 over a dom7.