#1
So I've been playing guitar for about 5-6 years and early on got hooked on to using tabs. I would really like to step away from the playing other's songs and stuff and start learning other styles and scales ect. What would be the best way to go about this.

thanks for looking.
#4
do you know any theory? that would be great place to start.

check out musictheory.net there are some great lesssons there.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#5
theory man. learning the building blocks of music will allow you to not only create your own music, but tackle harder compositions.

you mentioned you were hooked on tabs? just keep in mind it is possible to learn music theory without notation, or even better, along side learning notation. i see a lot of people coming from solid tablature reading getting freaked out by notation, then forgetting theory all together.

try to split different aspects of music and theory up to suit how you best learn. in other words balancing visual, auditory, and physical learning to give you an advantage. this will pay off in the future.
#6
Learn theory, learn the notes of the fretboard, listen to more music, improvise.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#7
Read up on the circle of fifths, it'll help you put chords together into progressions.
#8
Quote by innovine
Read up on the circle of fifths, it'll help you put chords together into progressions.

the circle of fifths doesnt really tell you much about chord progressions its more for scales.... as you move around the circle clockwise you add one sharp to the scale for example Starting on C when you move one space clockwise you get to G and the difference between C major and G major is one sharp (F#) if you move counter clockwise you add a flat so from C major to F major all you change is B to Bb.

its a tool for remembering key signatures. when the signature has one sharp you are either playing G major or E minor.... like wise if it has four sharps you would count by fifths C (0 #s), G (1 #), D (2 #s), A (3 #s), E (4 #s) thus the key signature is E major (or C# minor), in terms of chords it only tells you what the fifth chord is C then G or it will also tell you the fourth chord if you look one back. all that tells you is you can make a I IV V progression, which is a far more complicated way to figure that out when you can learn the pattern of chords for the major scale. (also I suppose you can find out the vi as well, but again not super helpful)

learning I ii iii IV V vi vii° for major and i ii° III iv v VI VII for minor (and what the roman numerals mean) is much more helpful. if you want to learn how to better construct a chord progression read up on music theory where you can learn the way chords are constructed from scales. musictheory.net is a great place to learn this, in fact there is a lesson all about chord progressions. I'm not trying to knock the circle of fifths but I've never seen it used effectively to teach chord progressions it really only teaches you to move up by one fifth, and I mean would you really consider C G D A E B F#/Gb Db Ab Eb Bb F C to be a good chord progression to learn?
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.