#1
As a guitarist of five years I'm wanting to start learning how to Sweep pick, as another tool in the tool box would be really helpful right now.As I'm starting to feel like my playing is now limited because I feel trapped in my playing.

I have found that the best way that I learn is by using patterns. As my music theory is very limited as I've been playing by ear all this time. I know basics in theory, but not enough as I would like to know.

I'm also wondering what sweep patterns are used in Wintersun's Beyond The Dark Sun so I can learn the patterns and eventually learn the song.

Tabs are here: http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/w/wintersun/beyond_the_dark_sun_ver3_tab.htm

Thanks for the help.
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#2
" as a guitarist of five years"
Are you really five years old?
Anyways, I suggest you learn how arpeggios can be spread across strings. They are often used in sweeps because they can easily be play across strings without shifting.
Minor and major patterns at the G B and e string is good to start out with, and as you get more knowledge about the theory behind it and feel comfortable with it, then move on to bigger sweeps like 5 string sweeps.

And by the way, sweeping can be a quite useless technique since you will rarely use it in a solo. It's fun to do, but not anything you'd need to expand your playing. Techniques such as vibrato, legato etc. matters more than sweeping.
#3
Quote by JB95
" as a guitarist of five years"
Are you really five years old?
Anyways, I suggest you learn how arpeggios can be spread across strings. They are often used in sweeps because they can easily be play across strings without shifting.
Minor and major patterns at the G B and e string is good to start out with, and as you get more knowledge about the theory behind it and feel comfortable with it, then move on to bigger sweeps like 5 string sweeps.

And by the way, sweeping can be a quite useless technique since you will rarely use it in a solo. It's fun to do, but not anything you'd need to expand your playing. Techniques such as vibrato, legato etc. matters more than sweeping.


Sweeping can be used in a very tasteful manner in all kind of music as long as you don't just do it up and down like a robot. Obviously, in metal it's used with less subtelty but don't forget that many technically proficient guitarists use sweeps in their soloing even in Fusion or Jazz.
#4
Quote by JB95
And by the way, sweeping can be a quite useless technique since you will rarely use it in a solo. It's fun to do, but not anything you'd need to expand your playing. Techniques such as vibrato, legato etc. matters more than sweeping.

That's tremendously incorrect. I use sweeping all the time in my solos. It's not the end-all of technique, but it's exactly as useful as you make it. I use sweeping arpeggios in my leads a lot in what I consider to be an interesting and tasteful manner. You might not, but neither of us is an authority to say whether or not sweeping is useful; that's up to each player.
#5
Okay, first of all, if you can't sweep yet and you try stuff like that, you're just gonna fail and feel like you'll never learn. Just saying, start off easy, working on the basic technique and getting an understanding of how you can use this technique before you rush into the really tough stuff.

I'd start off with 3 string sweeps before moving to 5 or 6 stringers. Just learn the basic major and minor sweep.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3yh_VPaOgw
This is a pretty tough sweep, but it has lots and lots of different sweeping patterns that you can learn.
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#6
Quote by Geldin
That's tremendously incorrect. I use sweeping all the time in my solos. It's not the end-all of technique, but it's exactly as useful as you make it. I use sweeping arpeggios in my leads a lot in what I consider to be an interesting and tasteful manner. You might not, but neither of us is an authority to say whether or not sweeping is useful; that's up to each player.


It depends on how you like to use them, since many I know tend to sweep up and down with no sense of creativity at all. I guess you're not one of those.
And I just told what I thought about the technique, and in my opinion, it's not a really useful technique. It depends on how a person want to use it, but it's still my opinion.
Authority is irrelevant.
#8
Quote by Fisheth24
As a guitarist of five years I'm wanting to start learning how to Sweep pick, as another tool in the tool box would be really helpful right now.As I'm starting to feel like my playing is now limited because I feel trapped in my playing.

I have found that the best way that I learn is by using patterns. As my music theory is very limited as I've been playing by ear all this time. I know basics in theory, but not enough as I would like to know.

I'm also wondering what sweep patterns are used in Wintersun's Beyond The Dark Sun so I can learn the patterns and eventually learn the song.

Tabs are here: http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/w/wintersun/beyond_the_dark_sun_ver3_tab.htm

Thanks for the help.

It will be better to start with one or two shapes and do 3 string arpeggios until you are comfortable. Then move on to 5 strings sweeps and combine 3 and 5 string sweeps.

You can start with a standard a minor arpeggio. You basically have 3 shapes so find one and get cracking.
#9
Arpeggios are a basic musical fundamental. They are not style or genre specific. If you're claiming that they are not an important part of playing, then you're lacking a basic fundamental. Sure you can play without them, just as you could strum a song with any single melodic notes, but their importance cannot be discounted.
#10
I just see it as a lead guitarist's way of playing chords. In some ways that's wrong I guess, but you should be sweeping chord tones most of the time from what I've seen. I think lots of people just don't like sweeping because they see it as showing off rather than making actual music.

Personally, I have found some sweep arpeggios to be decent "chords" to play over sometimes or just a way to add some kind flourish to a normal chord. It's all in how you use it I guess.

But really, I'm just talking out of my ass a bit now; I'm all tired and full of excuses in case I get flamed for this somehow.

EDIT: Presto Vivace by Yngwie Malmsteen is a good song to learn 3 string sweeps from. It's fun to play and also shows how you can use sweeping in a modal context. Of course, you don't have to play them at full speed right from the get-go but that isn't nearly as impossible as you would think on first glance.
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#11
I like to use panned sweep arpeggios as a backdrop for melodic solos in my mid- and bass-range. And for bass solos, because bass solos own.
#13
Quote by LordPino
Okay, first of all, if you can't sweep yet and you try stuff like that, you're just gonna fail and feel like you'll never learn. Just saying, start off easy, working on the basic technique and getting an understanding of how you can use this technique before you rush into the really tough stuff.

I'd start off with 3 string sweeps before moving to 5 or 6 stringers. Just learn the basic major and minor sweep.

Yeah this. Beyond the Dark Sun is pretty difficult, so you'll have to gradually build up to that.