#1
This is the song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rm1A9Qo5rog.

Starts in C#minor:
B# F# A C# | G# C# E G# | A C# F# G#| F# E A G# C# | A D# A C# | F# D# A C#| 
B# dim7    | C# minor   | G#11(b9)  | F#min9       |D#m7(b5)   |D#m7(b5)   |
vii*       | i          |V          |iv            |ii*        |ii*        |

| B# D# A B# | B D# A B | E B E G B E | D# A D# F# B# D# | C# G# C# E G# C#|
|B#dim7      |B7        |Em           |B#dim7            |i                |
|vii*        |VII       |iii          |vii*              |i                |


The beginning makes good use of the b5 interval (G), in both the melody and harmony. For example, iii is used instead of (E G B) vs III (E G# B) in between B7 and B#dim7. I think this is to avoid tonicization of E, but I'm not exactly sure (B7 to E maj is a V-I in E major).

The second part is where it modulates. After the B7 chord, it modulates to B major but still manages to sound like a modulation. I'm just wondering how this works since it seems like such an unconventional way to modulate.

Thanks
#2
There's no real "modulation" here because it runs around to C#. Modulation is the departure from one key to another, this usually requires a pretty strong cadence in the new key and a continuation thereafter. What we've got here is a brief tonicization of Em.

It's a cool use of a deceptive resolution of a dim7. Since dim7s are symmetrical and therefore rootless...they can resolve outwards 4 different ways. So while B#dim7 is the vii of C#m, it's also the vii of Em (D#dim7)...the V7 of any key is also only a half step different from the vii (or a rootless V7b9), which offers some cool chromatic bass movement.

B#dim7>B7, the B# moves down...the upper voices stay. Resolves to Em, the D#/B#dim7 appears again but then resolves back to tonic.

B7 is diatonic to C#m anyway, but the VII tends to function as V/III in minor keys...and it did that here, except they altered it to be a minor III rather than major. So the only alteration I'd make to your chord analysis is...call B7 V/III(iii) rather than VII
Last edited by chronowarp at Mar 18, 2012,
#3
Did you listen up until 1:43? That is not a modulation to B major? :s
#4
Quote by ibz120
Did you listen up until 1:43? That is not a modulation to B major? :s

I was just responding to the portion you had written out in the OP.

Edit:

It seems more like that next section cycles between E-G#m (Enharmonic to B, but it really sounds more like an aeolian groove), with transitional sections that sort of tonicize E, and then come back.

I wish I could find a full transcription of this more easily online...as much as I like listening I don't really have the time to break down the chord progression fully.
Last edited by chronowarp at Mar 18, 2012,