#1
Hi there,

Does anyone here have any experience (or just plain wisdom ), with recording to a computer using a Vox VT-40+ ?

I mean, what would I need to buy extra to be able to do so, and how good would the quality be?
#2
You'd need a mic, headphones (for monitoring) and an interface. You'd also need some software, Reaper is the usual suggestion.

The quality would depend on you. As someone just starting out with recording, it would be quite poor. After a lot of time learning & practicing etc, you could get some very professional quality recordings.

What is your ultimate aim with recording yourself? I'd only recommend software and all that goes with it if you want to get seriously into it, there is a huge learning curve and you will spend a lot of time working on getting the mix right.

If you are only looking to be able to record yourself as a hobby, possibly a practice/songwriting tool, you should consider getting a multitracker as your DAW. It will do everything that software can, but as it is purpose built equipment designed for home use, it is far easier to use and will produce some excellent quality results.
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#3
Quote by GaryBillington
You'd need a mic, headphones (for monitoring) and an interface. You'd also need some software, Reaper is the usual suggestion.

The quality would depend on you. As someone just starting out with recording, it would be quite poor. After a lot of time learning & practicing etc, you could get some very professional quality recordings.

What is your ultimate aim with recording yourself? I'd only recommend software and all that goes with it if you want to get seriously into it, there is a huge learning curve and you will spend a lot of time working on getting the mix right.

If you are only looking to be able to record yourself as a hobby, possibly a practice/songwriting tool, you should consider getting a multitracker as your DAW. It will do everything that software can, but as it is purpose built equipment designed for home use, it is far easier to use and will produce some excellent quality results.


It would be just for fun, really, nothing professional or anything.

The specs says that "The headphone out jack can also be used as a direct line output. This output is equipped with the simulated response and character of a speaker cabinet, so you'll enjoy the natural spatial sense of playing through speakers, even when using headphones or when connected to a mixer or recording system".

Isn't there a way to get some sort of cable from the headphone out jack directly into my computer (probably mono then) ?
Last edited by Kristof_EG at Mar 18, 2012,
#4
Quote by Kristof_EG
Isn't there a way to get some sort of cable from the headphone out jack directly into my computer (probably mono then) ?

All computers have a mic input. It would be physically possible to simply use a lead to connect the amp to the PC with a simple jack to jack lead, however the PC's input is designed for things like online chatting, not for recording. The quality will be absolutely terrible.

If you want to record yourself in any kind of useful way, you need to buy the proper kit. As you're only looking for a simple way to record yourself, I'd strongly recommend you purchase a multitracker. Second hand kit can be found reasonably cheap on eBay, it will be well worth your money.
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#5
Quote by GaryBillington

If you want to record yourself in any kind of useful way, you need to buy the proper kit. As you're only looking for a simple way to record yourself, I'd strongly recommend you purchase a multitracker. Second hand kit can be found reasonably cheap on eBay, it will be well worth your money.


Are there any good brands that sell these multitrackers? And it's like a connection between the amp and the computer, right?
#7
Quote by GaryBillington
All computers have a mic input. It would be physically possible to simply use a lead to connect the amp to the PC with a simple jack to jack lead, however the PC's input is designed for things like online chatting, not for recording. The quality will be absolutely terrible.

If you want to record yourself in any kind of useful way, you need to buy the proper kit. As you're only looking for a simple way to record yourself, I'd strongly recommend you purchase a multitracker. Second hand kit can be found reasonably cheap on eBay, it will be well worth your money.



I have done it with my AD30VT.
Didn't sound great.
For me it was more of a way to just record my ideas before I lost them.
Quality for that wasn't really a concern for me in doing that.
I wasn't going after a Grammy.

And some PC's also have a Line Input in addition to a mic input.
The Line Input sounds much better than using the mic input.

I now have a Tascam Portastudio. The 8 track one with the memory card instead of the CD burner.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Mar 18, 2012,
#9
Quote by Kristof_EG
Are there any good brands that sell these multitrackers? And it's like a connection between the amp and the computer, right?

No, multitrackers are a standalone recording unit, they do everything from the initial recording to creating the final mix of your song. You don't need to use your computer for anything, which makes the whole process far more simple.

The main brands to look for are Tascam & Fostex, my current DAW is a Tascam multitracker and my previous one was a Fostex, both are highly recommended. Other main brands are Boss (never tried one, but they tend to be more expensive) and Yamaha (had one for a little while, personally I didn't like the user interface).

Zoom are another make to look for. Their older units are standalone multitrackers, however their current range (R8, R16 & R24) are designed to be a hybrid multitracker/interface. They can be used as a standalone multitracker, but can also be used as a PC interface and act as the control board for your recording software.

If you decide you definitely want to use your PC for recording, you could get something like the Zoom, alternatively there are a lot of interfaces which would allow you to interact with your PC for recording, but like I said there is a much steeper learning curve and it will take a lot more of your time to get acceptable recordings. If you want recording to become a serious hobby, this is the way to go, however for someone who just wants an easy way of recording themselves multitrackers are definitely the way to go.
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#11
Quote by guitarherolol
I've got a recording using the VT40+ and a cheap £2 mic on my profile.

And if you're happy with that level of quality, then good luck to you.
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#12
Quote by GaryBillington
And if you're happy with that level of quality, then good luck to you.

it was a test to see what it would sound like, you sound like you're on a moral highhorse here, I never said it sounded decent.
Hey there.
#13
Quote by guitarherolol
it was a test to see what it would sound like, you sound like you're on a moral highhorse here, I never said it sounded decent.

Not necessarily a moral high horse, but from your first post I got the impression you were trying to say that it was a good method of getting a decent quality recording. If that wasn't what you meant, I'm not sure what it added to the thread?

Considering the kit you said you used it wasn't as bad as I was expecting, but it's not a recording I'd be advertising myself with. Like TS, you could improve your recording quality significantly by getting a proper DAW, either an interface if you decide to stick with PC recording or a multitracker.
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#14
With "interface", do you mean something like the LINE 6 POD STUDIO GX? Can that one be used in combination with an amp, so guitar-->amp-->POD-->computer and then start the recording in the software?
#15
Yes, I believe the POD can be used as an interface - you'd need to check in the manual for exactly how it works, but I know that is one of it's functions.

If you decide to go that route, Reaper is generally recognised as the best software DAW that can be obtained for free.
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#16
Quote by GaryBillington
Yes, I believe the POD can be used as an interface - you'd need to check in the manual for exactly how it works, but I know that is one of it's functions.

If you decide to go that route, Reaper is generally recognised as the best software DAW that can be obtained for free.


Thanks for the info. Do you know of any other interfaces that're a bit cheaper?
#17
The M-Audio Fast Track is quite highly rated and reasonably priced. Check it out here:
http://www.andertons.co.uk/usb-interfaces/pid19683/cid712/pro-tools-recording-studio-fast-track-interface-and-software.asp

There are loads of threads in the recordings forum that discuss the pros and cons of a wide variety of interfaces. As with all equipment, people post a thread asking "which xxx should I buy?" and then everyone talks about why the one they own is their favourite.

As is always the case, that only covers their opinions. You need to do some proper investigation into what you are considering purchasing, ensuring:
a - that PC based recording is the correct option for you rather than using a multitracker as your DAW
b - that once you have made your decision about which route to take, you select the specific kit that is the appropriate option for you.

As the choice of your preferred method and the equipment you use is purely subjective, only you can make this decision. From what you've said so far in the thread, in my opinion you would be better suited to a multitracker, however only you can decide how you want to proceed.
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