#1
Hi. I was planning on getting a drum set soon and I was wondering how I would go about teaching myself.

Can I get any advice on this, please?
#4
I can really recommend drumlessonscom on youtube. Lots of very useful lessons on there.
#5
A large portion of drumming is practice. Technique is developed as you drum for longer amounts of time. Just remember, that drumming is not all about being able to do crazy things. Repetition.
#7
Or you can try going Here.

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#8
http://www.schoolofmusiconline.com/

This really is the place to go. Lot's of youtube videos and freedrumlessons.com dumb stuff down or teach you bad habits, this site is the absolute best place for the absolute beginner to learn drums. After you've got your technique down and can play confidently in time (ALWAYS USE A MUTHA****IN METRONOME WHEN PRACTICING) then there are all sorts of interesting youtube videos and such to teach you some beats, fills, concepts, ect. but if you try those out now as a beginner you'll probably learn everything wrong, it's best to just get your technique as close to perfect as possible and always stay in as close to perfect time as possible before you move on to crazy fills 'n' such.

edit: I also recommend some books on marching band/drumline snare drumming, and "Funky Primer for the Rock Drummer," and of course the Chapin book "Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer." The Chapin book is where you learn to go from "yeah I can keep time and all" to "give me a beat and I'll play it backwards with my hands tied behind my back."
Last edited by TMVATDI at Mar 19, 2012,
#9
If you don't mind spending a few dollars, learnandmaster.com has a decent videoset on drumming. Haven't look that closely that the drum one, but if it's anything near what the guitar course is, it's not really that much they'll skip.
#10
all i can say is work up your stick control/drills first. i am very glad i did that before going to deep.
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#11
JoJo Mayer - Secret Weapons of a Drummer, or at least something like that, a must have dvd which covers grip and hand technique in depth.
Billy Ward - Big Time, awesome dvd which helps with time keeping, ergonomics of the kit etc.

There's loads of other books and dvd's, Tommy Igoe's Groove Essentials is a must have, it walks you through just about every genre known to drummers lol.

Btw, as already suggested, watch some top teachers on Youtube and copy their technique as you WILL pick up bad habits without a teacher.
#12
Quote by Beezerk
Btw, as already suggested, watch some top teachers on Youtube and copy their technique as you WILL pick up bad habits without a teacher.
This is not necessarily true. It's only more likely that someone would due to lack of awareness of their own body and what does or doesn't constitute good technique and such, but it's still entirely possible for one to gain an understanding of proper technique on their own.

And I feel purposely imitating someone's technique is rather silly, anyway. Everyone's body is different.
#13
Use the internet. And when you listen to music, actually listen to the drum tracks, and really try and pay attention to what the drummer is doing and why they are doing it. And one thing that really helped me; playing legs. Don't just do constant RLRLRLRL, actually play along with the song playing on your legs. It sounds wierd, but can help you get timing and a real understanding of the drum tracks down.
#14
Quote by Steve08
This is not necessarily true. It's only more likely that someone would due to lack of awareness of their own body and what does or doesn't constitute good technique and such, but it's still entirely possible for one to gain an understanding of proper technique on their own.

And I feel purposely imitating someone's technique is rather silly, anyway. Everyone's body is different.


You're not imitating someones technique as such, you're imitating the correct way to play drums with the right technique..
There's a variety of grips, bounce techniques you name it, you need to try them all and find which suits your style best.
If you're practising with bad technique it's kinda pointless practising at all.
#15
If you can listen to a song and pick out the kick drum, snare, hi hat and such, you can teach yourself any song. I know this sounds crazy, but you can practice with just drumsticks and the air just to get the feel for a song. At least on the beginner level, practicing like that is transferable to real drums. Of course, to get everything all tight and perfect, you'd probably need to practice on the real set.
#17
Pick up the Jojo Mayer video someone recommended.

Honestly your best bet is to practice rudiments to a click and then jam out to some songs. I'd also recommend experimenting with different grips and techniques. A lot of drummers start playing in a fashion similar to whichever drummer they idolize but that could develop bad habits.

Besides that, find different licks and grooves that you like on youtube. This will help build versatility as it doesn't help to be a one-trick-pony.

Focus on your fingers, wrists, and ankles for developing your stroke. Too many new drummers use their whole arm to play; it's no different than playing guitar. Stay loose, fluid, and controlled.
Last edited by eprex at Apr 30, 2012,