#1
Hey all.
I've been attending UConn for the last year thinking that I'd want to be a math teacher. After actually getting into it, and having to surround myself in math, I realized that I don't actually want to do it. I've always wanted to do something with music, but I had many people telling me it's just not realistic. My friend's dad is a gigging musician, and he does not recommend it by any means just because it's too hard to support a family.
Recently, I've been talking to my dad, step-dad, and others who told me to "not give up on my dreams this early in my life" and other similar things. I understand completely. I wanted to become a math teacher for a secure job and all, but my heart just wasn't in it.
After a bit of consideration, I've decided I wanted to give production a shot (not sure what or if there's a difference between audio engineering and music production) and I was wondering where I could go to learn how to do it. I would love to just have a job in a studio working on stuff, and I think it'd also be a great skill as a performer because I'd be able to work on my own stuff as well.
I've checked out GIT/MI and heard a few good things, but mainly bad things, so I've pretty much ruled that out. My girlfriend, and one of my best friends goes to SUNY Purchase, and apparently there's a good audio engineering program there. Another friend goes to NYU and told me that there's a good on there, as well as Berklee, and University of Hartford.
Any insight you could offer would help me out a lot.
Sorry for the wall of text
- Chris

tl;dr I don't want to be a math teacher. What do I need to do in order to get a job in a studio?
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#2
Learn how to work in audio production (ie take a audio production course), learn the sound physics and theory and then apply to a studio.

It's not as easy as just applying, you need to have some skills like any job.
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#3
So then do you recommend not even going to a University or other school?
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Here, an awesome medal. It's made out of awesomnite.
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Thank you!
I would give you an awesome metal, but
I can't find any awesomnite.
#4
Don't take an audio production course. Whatever degree you get, it won't do shit for you. What matters is your portfolio and your contacts. Get a few books on the subject, and learn for yourself. It isn't even that hard. But I'd also recommend taking the course simply for meeting people and making contacts. Just like an instrument, this'll need practice so you might want to pay an audio engineer or get a job as an assistant or something to learn from him.

It's an even tougher job than being a musician, apparently. My friend was taking an audio engineering course and he realized half-way that it really won't mean anything. So he started producing other people's music as often as he can, meeting people all over the place in the business etc and so forth. He's got a few contacts already and he's just in his second year at uni.
#5
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Don't take an audio production course. Whatever degree you get, it won't do shit for you.


Not necessarily.
It gets you an insight into how the industry works for a start. A lot of courses also include the option of doing the year before your finals in a professional, paid environment of your choosing just so you can get a foot in the door. Make a good enough impression, and they could well ask you back once you've passed the final year.

That's what I'm aiming at. If that doesn't work, ask around every studio you can. They all need a coffee boy to make them refreshments. Be prepared for poorly paid/unpaid work for a while, and living at home. From there, learn the ropes of the engineer and see if he'll take you as an "apprentice" to help him do shit around. Look into any and every secretarial/desk position in the studio and do a stint on that. Make sure you know the producer sees you're 100% committed to staying in this work and aim to move up one day.
What you need is balls and motivation above perfect knowledge.
You will not be walking straight into a 20k/p.a career, or even one that earns you a living for the first year or so. Once you understand that, it'll be a lot more rewarding.
#6
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Don't take an audio production course.

Ignore this sentence. The rest of the advice is good, but when faced with a load of applicants, all with a decent portfolio of recordings & productions, if you don't have a relevant degree yours will be the first CV in the bin.
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#7
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Don't take an audio production course.

This. I do music technology and it's absolutely useless and always will be.
Weirdly I'm in the opposite situation. I thought I'd want to work in music in some way but after being on my course I've realised I don't enjoy it at all, and if anything I should have done maths

The only real way to get into the music industry is by knowing people who are, sorry if that's not very useful.
#8
You can definitely learn production on your own.
There's a special sex move I do called the Charizard.
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#9
Hey man, I sent you a private message, let me know!
Matthew 7:7 ""Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you."

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#10
What about going to see the boys at WCCC on Asylum Ave? Speak to the production manager. Although in radio, just so you know, he gets paid like crap. Dime a dozen these days.

BTW, loving this weather we're having, gonna be in the eighties this week. Good luck.
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#11
Thanks for the advice to all, whether you were sincere or not. I think my plan of action is to go to a few studios, and talk to the people there. I wanna see exactly what they look for and what I need to do to get to where I wanna be. I'm still leaning away from an institution such as MI, and more towards a university. Preferably SUNY Purchase or NYU (if I can get in and somehow come up with the money). However if most of the studios tell me to just learn it on my own, and come back with a portfolio, I'll do that. I don't want to waste 4 years of my life and $100,000 just to have a piece of paper that won't do anything. If it IS going to do something, I for sure don't mind putting in the effort to get it. Again, if anyone can offer more advice or personal experience, I'd greatly appreciate it. Thanks again.
Quote by Eddie4President
You are amazing. The fact that you have paramore next to disturbed shows how awesome you are.
Here, an awesome medal. It's made out of awesomnite.
:extends medal:


Quote by Fallen_Seeker
Thank you!
I would give you an awesome metal, but
I can't find any awesomnite.
#12
I nearly have my bachelors in Illustration in UofH and it is pretty meaningless. What was important were the techniques I learned there rather than the paper. The Hartt School of Music, when I went, was toted as one of the best.

You sound like me my junior year of college. I changed my major, started playing sports, basically found every excuse in the book not to finish.

In the end it didn't really matter, I didn't get into Illustration or Law or anything remotely similar. In fact, I still don't know what I want to do with my life.

This is an important fork in the road of your life, of your own creation. Sounds like you are doing your homework on what you want to do, but just be careful (if you don't mind my advice), don't be impulsive, and i'd say try and finish what you started, there will be plenty of time after that to change your mind.

But at least you will have something to fall back on.
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Last edited by mystical_1 at Mar 18, 2012,
#13
Quote by mystical_1
I nearly have my bachelors in Illustration in UofH and it is pretty meaningless. What was important were the techniques I learned there rather than the paper. The Hartt School of Music, when I went, was toted as one of the best.

You sound like me my junior year of college. I changed my major, started playing sports, basically found every excuse in the book not to finish.

In the end it didn't really matter, I didn't get into Illustration or Law or anything remotely similar. In fact, I still don't know what I want to do with my life.

This is an important fork in the road of your life, of your own creation. Sounds like you are doing your homework on what you want to do, but just be careful (if you don't mind my advice), don't be impulsive, and i'd say try and finish what you started, there will be plenty of time after that to change your mind.

But at least you will have something to fall back on.


I understand completely. This is where I'm trying to decide if I wanna just go out and try and get a job, or if it will be useful to go to school, learn a bit AND get a piece of paper to help me. Either way, I'm going to learn the stuff, I just need to figure out if going to school would give me a significant advantage. So I really do appreciate the advice you, as well as everyone else has given so far. Hopefully it'll all make my decision a bit easier.
Quote by Eddie4President
You are amazing. The fact that you have paramore next to disturbed shows how awesome you are.
Here, an awesome medal. It's made out of awesomnite.
:extends medal:


Quote by Fallen_Seeker
Thank you!
I would give you an awesome metal, but
I can't find any awesomnite.
#14
Electronics with music tech is a route I am taking. Gives me all the plusses (and some) with a big backup!

Time on earth is like butterscotch; you really want more, even though it will probably just make you ill.



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#15
Quote by mystical_1
What was important were the techniques I learned there rather than the paper.


This is why a course would be good for you.
OUT OF ORDER
#16
Become a chem teacher instead and sell meth.

281-330-8004, that's my cell phone number, hit me up on the low
#17
Quote by moscaespañol
Become a chem teacher instead and sell meth.


Oh. *changes username to Heisenberg* I'll get right on that.
Quote by Eddie4President
You are amazing. The fact that you have paramore next to disturbed shows how awesome you are.
Here, an awesome medal. It's made out of awesomnite.
:extends medal:


Quote by Fallen_Seeker
Thank you!
I would give you an awesome metal, but
I can't find any awesomnite.
#18
Quote by mystical_1
In fact, I still don't know what I want to do with my life.

I'm 37, I haven't decided what I want to do when I grow up yet.

However, I got a reasonable education and have ended up in a job I quite enjoy (most of the time).

OP - Whether anyone ends up doing the job they want to do when they're still young, or whether they end up doing something completely different, a good education is always a good way to get started. Without that, if you don't end up doing what you thought you wanted, or if you change your mind, you're going to end up nowhere.
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My SoundCloud
#19
Quote by GaryBillington
I'm 37, I haven't decided what I want to do when I grow up yet.

However, I got a reasonable education and have ended up in a job I quite enjoy (most of the time).

OP - Whether anyone ends up doing the job they want to do when they're still young, or whether they end up doing something completely different, a good education is always a good way to get started. Without that, if you don't end up doing what you thought you wanted, or if you change your mind, you're going to end up nowhere.

dat join date

281-330-8004, that's my cell phone number, hit me up on the low
#20
Quote by moscaespañol
dat join date

Yep - Nov 01 was the first month anyone could create an account on UG, I've been here since it all began
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#21
Being a musician today means being your own business. You cannot go into this field hoping to get a comfortable employment status. The first thing you must accept and embrace is that you will always be an independent contractor. In order to be a viable business, not only must you be excellent in your specialty, but also offer a wide range of skill sets and be pro-active in maintaining a presence.

The ideal setup for a musician today is to have multiple sources of income, which does not have to be substantial by themselves, but becomes sustainable as a whole. In today's volatile economic condition, musicians and artists can actually be at an advantage if you consider that in the event of one revenue source disappearing, it won't be devastating as you have other sources, as opposed to traditional employment in which your livelihood depends on one employer. However, people like your friend's dad are unfortunately not going to cut it anymore. The reason why it's not sustainable for him is because he is a gigging musician, and I'm assuming nothing more.

So for example, if you want to go into audio engineering, this is what you may really be doing:
1. regular position at a studio
2. freelancing
2. technical consultant for staging and studio setups
3. producer working on multiple projects
4. writer or blogger for music technology and publications (Twitter, FB, SC, YouTube, blogs, magazines, etc)
5. Teaching music and audio tech privately
6. Playing and gigging
7. Writing/producing your own music, registered with BMI/ASCAP/SESAC, and getting performance royalty from air play.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#22
Quote by Xiaoxi
Being a musician today means being your own business. You cannot go into this field hoping to get a comfortable employment status. The first thing you must accept and embrace is that you will always be an independent contractor. In order to be a viable business, not only must you be excellent in your specialty, but also offer a wide range of skill sets and be pro-active in maintaining a presence.

The ideal setup for a musician today is to have multiple sources of income, which does not have to be substantial by themselves, but becomes sustainable as a whole. In today's volatile economic condition, musicians and artists can actually be at an advantage if you consider that in the event of one revenue source disappearing, it won't be devastating as you have other sources, as opposed to traditional employment in which your livelihood depends on one employer. However, people like your friend's dad are unfortunately not going to cut it anymore. The reason why it's not sustainable for him is because he is a gigging musician, and I'm assuming nothing more.

So for example, if you want to go into audio engineering, this is what you may really be doing:
1. regular position at a studio
2. freelancing
2. technical consultant for staging and studio setups
3. producer working on multiple projects
4. writer or blogger for music technology and publications (Twitter, FB, SC, YouTube, blogs, magazines, etc)
5. Teaching music and audio tech privately
6. Playing and gigging
7. Writing/producing your own music, registered with BMI/ASCAP/SESAC, and getting performance royalty from air play.


Yeah, I'd agree with that. I want to focus on producing, however I write as well, and would also love to give lessons in both music and producing if I become proficient enough.
Quote by Eddie4President
You are amazing. The fact that you have paramore next to disturbed shows how awesome you are.
Here, an awesome medal. It's made out of awesomnite.
:extends medal:


Quote by Fallen_Seeker
Thank you!
I would give you an awesome metal, but
I can't find any awesomnite.
#23
Came here to post the backstage porn interview room picture ... couldn't find it ...
- - - - - - - - - - -
#24
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Don't take an audio production course. Whatever degree you get, it won't do shit for you. What matters is your portfolio and your contacts. Get a few books on the subject, and learn for yourself. It isn't even that hard. But I'd also recommend taking the course simply for meeting people and making contacts. Just like an instrument, this'll need practice so you might want to pay an audio engineer or get a job as an assistant or something to learn from him.

It's an even tougher job than being a musician, apparently. My friend was taking an audio engineering course and he realized half-way that it really won't mean anything. So he started producing other people's music as often as he can, meeting people all over the place in the business etc and so forth. He's got a few contacts already and he's just in his second year at uni.



I bolded what is probably the most important tip anyone here could give you on this subject.
The old "Its not what you know, but WHO you know".