#1
I'm playing in drop A# with 12-56 Ernie Ball 'not even slinkies', is this too much tension? I'm having trouble building speed and I'm not sure if it's the strings.. I'm not looking for excuses, I just want be sure I'm not wasting time on the wrong gauge.
#2
I play in D Standard with 11s, so you're playing a whole tone down from my tuning, and your lowest strings has been tuned down a further step. Honestly, I could imagine a lot of people here might say you don't have enough tension if anything. String tension doesn't really have anything to do with speed, it will definitely make bends much harder and force you to build tension, but 12s in C Standard is equal to 10s in E Standard, in my opinion, which is the standard, really. So no, it won't stop you from getting faster.
#3
Basically... no. The only time you've wasted is the time you could have spent practicing instead of typing this out.
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#4
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Basically... no. The only time you've wasted is the time you could have spent practicing instead of typing this out.


Lol.. nice.

Oh shit I'm doing it again.
#5
I use the "Not Even Slinky" strings on drop c tuning, so over tension sure as hell ain't a problem. It shouldn't affect your speed too much, I personally find that I slow down a little if my strings don't have enough tension, as the string just gives way to the pick stroke a little much for me, but certainly nothing huge and that's just a personal thing, not a rule.
#6
Stevie Ray Vaughan used strings so heavy that his High E was 13 Gauge...They used to rip his hands to shreds...after he ripped the Calluses off of his fingers, he used to superglue his fingers to his shoulder & Rip the skin off of his shoulder that way....
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#7
Quote by Mazz-
Stevie Ray Vaughan used strings so heavy that his High E was 13 Gauge...They used to rip his hands to shreds...after he ripped the Calluses off of his fingers, he used to superglue his fingers to his shoulder & Rip the skin off of his shoulder that way....



I know he is a complete legend but I don't see what benefit that would have. Its Stevie the only one to do this?
#8
Yes, it will to an extent, but... I can't answer that because it depends entirely on how you play.

Some people like very heavy strings because their playing style uses the extra tension to keep it all in check. On the other hand, people like myself like very light strings because I barely have to touch them, though it requires a light touch. If I swapped my guitar for another person's with much heavier strings, and vice versa, it would seriously affect our technique and speed.

But as I said, I don't know your playing style and what you like. The easiest way? Try different strings. I assume you're using a 25.5" scale guitar, so I'd use a .064 for Bb for reasonably firm tension. You'd probably have to buy strings individually to test them out.
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#9
You're playing in Drop A#..

You can't play with much lighter strings than that really.
#10
My band plays in drop C, D and standard. For my drop C guitar, I get the biggest strings I can find. Usually 13's. The only problems I have is tremelo picking on the lowest string (the C) can be tricky as it is a bit looser than the other 5. I'm just starting to write everything in standard or drop D because I hate having tension hold me back.

^^ Lol at the SRV comment, made my day. You get used to them in about a month or two, they aren't that bad, kind of like playing with acoustic strings on an electric, once you get used to them you can play on anything though.
#11
Quote by Rustee
I'm playing in drop A# with 12-56 Ernie Ball 'not even slinkies', is this too much tension? I'm having trouble building speed and I'm not sure if it's the strings.. I'm not looking for excuses, I just want be sure I'm not wasting time on the wrong gauge.

I know that flatter tuned strings does translate to less tension which might mean less picking speed.

I would recommend to get a standard guitar tuned to standard tuning and getting practice in on that one as well. You will find the extra tension of the strings tough and challenging but it will train your hand better than floppy strings.