#1
I'm looking at improving my home studio (mainly with acoustic insulation) and was wondering if people on here can give me some suggestions.

Heres a video walkaround: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkvQ041JQrU&feature=plcp&context=C4649689VDvjVQa1PpcFPYdycj3fCKcA6XUVIr6n2E7ngIH3vXK64%3D

At the moment I'm running Logic Studio 9 on a Mac Mini with a Tascam US-1800 interface with KRK RP5's.

I'm not on the biggest budget so preferably not professional studio quality stuff.

Cheers.
Last edited by Afroboy267 at Mar 19, 2012,
#2
I think the size and dimensions of the room are going to limit what you can do realistically (especially in terms of placing diffusors and absorption foam) but the first things that popped into my mind were:

1) Acoustic guitars hanging on the wall in a control room is a no-no. Even if you don't always notice it, they are likely to resonate in sympathy to certain frequencies and add to the volume of those, making the frequency response of the room more uneven. This same issue could occur when recording with a mic in the room, if you use the room to record in too.

2) Try and get your desk out of the corner it is in... at the very least, could you swap its position with the small dresser next to it (the one with the lamp and what looks like a CD or vinyl player on)? That would bring you out of the corner a little and reduce some of the bass build-up that is likely to occur around your left monitor.

3) The wall to your left (when mixing/using the computer) could have a small panel fitted/hung next to your left ear, to reduce early reflections there from the right monitor, though it might not have too much affect based on your proximity to the speakers.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Mar 19, 2012,
#3
Quote by DisarmGoliath
I think the size and dimensions of the room are going to limit what you can do realistically (especially in terms of placing diffusors and absorption foam) but the first things that popped into my mind were:

1) Acoustic guitars hanging on the wall in a control room is a no-no. Even if you don't always notice it, they are likely to resonate in sympathy to certain frequencies and add to the volume of those, making the frequency response of the room more uneven. This same issue could occur when recording with a mic in the room, if you use the room to record in too.

2) Try and get your desk out of the corner it is in... at the very least, could you swap its position with the small dresser next to it (the one with the lamp and what looks like a CD or vinyl player on)? That would bring you out of the corner a little and reduce some of the bass build-up that is likely to occur around your left monitor.

3) The wall to your left (when mixing/using the computer) could have a small panel fitted/hung next to your left ear, to reduce early reflections there from the right monitor, though it might not have too much affect based on your proximity to the speakers.

Ok cool, cheers. These are all good suggestions. I'll definatly look at apply them. Thanks .
#4
Agreed about the guitars.

You have the same dilemma I do in my studio. It is a very small room, by the looks of things.

As a general rule, you want the mix position to fit symmetrically within the room, which means putting it mid-way between two walls. The distance between the two long walls appears very short, so I don't think I would advise putting the mix position along the long wall. Sound would reflect back to you very, very quickly and would be a mess. That leaves setting up your mix position along a shorter wall. Rather than interfere with the door, I'd put it under the window and leave enough space between the desk and the rad at the far end.

For panels, here are the ones I made that were pretty inexpensive and easy to build. I think they cost me about $200-ish and made about a dozen panels of varying size.

https://plus.google.com/photos/105151472351939734946/albums/5666851243565868161?authkey=CMqj8aqgrZKZDQ

For the record, my room is 8' from side to side and 9'6" from front to back.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.