#1
I have a really really crappy acoustic guitar. The neck is warped, the tone is awful, and the action is so high, it's nearly impossible to play, unless you're playing slide guitar. However, I find that when I practice on this guitar, and then I switch over to my SG or PRS (which don't suck), I find myself flying all over it. It's like, I get so used to having to deal with all the crappiness of that acoustic, that when I switch over to my other guitars, it just seems much smoother and easier to play than it normally does when I don't play my acoustic first, since I really have to push myself on my acoustic. Like, you know that feeling when you think you're about to pick up something that looks really heavy, but then it turns out to be super light, and you feel like superman? That's kinda how I feel after I play on my acoustic, and switch over to my electric. I was just wondering, is this a bad habit? Should I not be doing this, or is this perfectly fine?
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#2
isnt that the reason why begginners should start on an acoustic guitar?
#4
It's like that with everything, if you practice keepy uppy with a small football when you move back to a regular size on it is easier.

My first guitar the action was high as hell but it was all I knew. So when I got my 2nd guitar that had a much lower action it was super easy to play. Then I got a 3rd guitar and when I went back to my 2nd guitar it's action was now too high. I'm chasing the dragon so to speak.

To answer your question I don't know, but personally I wouldn't want to have to play the acoustic first in order to play the electric.
#5
I play on my terrible acoustic all the time for the same effect! If you practise properly on it and are careful not to hurt or strain yourself because of it's terrible set-up, I think it's a very worthwhile thing to do
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#6
It doesn't "help your technique" at all, it's just the better guitar is easier to play - you're percieving it as helping because you're comparing it to playing the crappy guitar but it's just psychological, there's absolutely no difference to how you're playing and you're not getting any benefit.

Think about what happens if you eat a cake, then drink a sweet drink like coke - the coke will taste less sweet than usual but the coke itself hasn't changed, it still contains the same amount of sugar, you're just perceiving it differently.
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#7
Quote by steven seagull
It doesn't "help your technique" at all, it's just the better guitar is easier to play - you're percieving it as helping because you're comparing it to playing the crappy guitar but it's just psychological, there's absolutely no difference to how you're playing and you're not getting any benefit.

Think about what happens if you eat a cake, then drink a sweet drink like coke - the coke will taste less sweet than usual but the coke itself hasn't changed, it still contains the same amount of sugar, you're just perceiving it differently.


Haha nice analogy but you are mixing up the equivalent. Amount of sugar=guitar, sensation of taste=playing. In order to sound good on a bad guitar you have to change your motorik habits which can be beneficial to some degree. Synchronisation of hands and fretting will profit the most I think, because the bad guitar won´t excuse any cut corners. It doesn´t help for phrasing on the electric much, it is too different. In general it is good to mix up your playing conditions in order to not be over reliant on them.
#8
I think it helps. My first guitar was crappy acoustic Stagg with high action. It took me 4-5 months do be able to do F barre chord, and today I sometimes still have troubles with F barre on the same guitar(I don't play acoustic that much, like I play electric). On friend's acoustic F major is so easy. I think it's like sports: when you practice with weights (crappy acoustic) and that put the weights off (switch to electric), you 're flying
#9
Quote by steven seagull
It doesn't "help your technique" at all, it's just the better guitar is easier to play - you're percieving it as helping because you're comparing it to playing the crappy guitar but it's just psychological, there's absolutely no difference to how you're playing and you're not getting any benefit.

Think about what happens if you eat a cake, then drink a sweet drink like coke - the coke will taste less sweet than usual but the coke itself hasn't changed, it still contains the same amount of sugar, you're just perceiving it differently.


this, honestly. the only thing that practicing on a bad guitar will do for you is being able to play better on a bad guitar. and i'm not saying that's not a worthwhile skill to have -- i've had to play for friends on shitty guitars where the set-up was so bad that i couldn't even play notes above the seventh fret.
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#10
Quote by kimi_page
I think it helps. My first guitar was crappy acoustic Stagg with high action. It took me 4-5 months do be able to do F barre chord, and today I sometimes still have troubles with F barre on the same guitar(I don't play acoustic that much, like I play electric). On friend's acoustic F major is so easy. I think it's like sports: when you practice with weights (crappy acoustic) and that put the weights off (switch to electric), you 're flying


Nah, playing on a bad guitar exclusively for months is not the way to go if you can help it. That might mess up your motions, technique, phrasing and it is not fun. Mix it up from time to time once you have those down to be aware of the difficulties one might encounter on different instruments.
#11
Quote by AeolianWolf
this, honestly. the only thing that practicing on a bad guitar will do for you is being able to play better on a bad guitar. and i'm not saying that's not a worthwhile skill to have -- i've had to play for friends on shitty guitars where the set-up was so bad that i couldn't even play notes above the seventh fret.


No like I said, the adjustments that you make in your motions to sound good on a bad guitar can oftentimes translate into a benefit for your overall skills.
#12
Quote by Facecut
No like I said, the adjustments that you make in your motions to sound good on a bad guitar can oftentimes translate into a benefit for your overall skills.


like i said. the only thing playing on a bad guitar will improve is playing on bad guitars. it does not accelerate your growth in any way, shape, or form. the fact of the matter remains that, unless you suck and are practicing on a good guitar poorly, switching to a bad guitar is not going to do jack for you. depending on what you need to do to produce a good tone on said guitar, it can even HINDER your progress. practicing correctly on a good guitar is no different from practicing correctly on a bad guitar. just because the latter is more difficult does not mean it provides any additional benefits.

seagull and i made our point -- he gave an analogy (which, quite frankly, you butchered, leading me to think you misunderstand it), and explained the psychological illusion involved. you, on the other hand, have offered nothing but "this is what i think", and "trust me bro im right".

if you can give a compelling argument supported by facts, i'm more than willing to listen.
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#13
Quote by AeolianWolf

seagull and i made our point -- he gave an analogy (which, quite frankly, you butchered, leading me to think you misunderstand it), and explained the psychological illusion involved. you, on the other hand, have offered nothing but "this is what i think", and "trust me bro im right".


Thats the same crap as the hollow phrase: "practising the exercise will only make you good at that exercise". An exercise lays focus on a particular situation and provides better preparation in similar situation you might encounter in music. Thats why it makes you better overall.
I am not particularly interested in convincing you. In a forum converge experienced an inexperienced persons. When veterans just provide their experience its up to the noobies to assign their trust.
#14
Quote by Facecut
Thats the same crap as the hollow phrase: "practising the exercise will only make you good at that exercise". An exercise lays focus on a particular situation and provides better preparation in similar situation you might encounter in music. Thats why it makes you better overall.
I am not particularly interested in convincing you. In a forum converge experienced an inexperienced persons. When veterans just provide their experience its up to the noobies to assign their trust.


and i'm not particularly interested in being convinced by someone who thinks they're more experienced than a professional new york city composer just because he's been on a website for an additional two years.

have fun believing your fallacies -- others will come in here and finish up, i'm sure.
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#15
Quote by AeolianWolf
and i'm not particularly interested in being convinced by someone who thinks they're more experienced than a professional new york city composer just because he's been on a website for an additional two years.

have fun believing your fallacies -- others will come in here and finish up, i'm sure.


When did I say anything about you being less experienced than me? Do you come here to fix your ego issues? Read closer. I was speaking about veterans and noobies in general without saying you are one or the other. I learn that about members from the statements they make and I don´t make my judgement after one thread.
Last edited by Facecut at Mar 19, 2012,
#16
I think practising on a bad guitar is a bad idea - if the neck is warped, you'll get used to poor intonation, for example. I don't see anything wrong with playing on a slightly-more-difficult-to-play guitar, such as one with thicker strings or a raised action, as it'll just get you used to a wider variety of guitars meaning that if you pick up someone elses acoustic, you're not going to have a problem playing it. Similarly, you'll be used to a multitude of neck thicknesses, which can be quite jarring if you're not used to a thin or thick neck.

I did my finger independence, legato and bending exercises on an electric with an intentionally raised action and I found it quite beneficial. I've stopped doing that now as I haven't played much for the past month and I'm out of the habit, but I certainly found it helped. Just don't go over the top with it - super high action, super thick strings, as you'll generally never actually come across that scenario and it can't be particularly good for you.
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