#1
so the input jack in my guitar is damaged (the connection goes on and off if i move the cable a little), so i guess the wire is broken / soldering connection damaged and i want to repair it myself.

guess it shouldn't be too difficult, but i'm a beginner and have a couple of questions:

1. What Soldering Iron to use:
Does it make it easier / less likely to fail if you use one with a certain power (15w or so)?
should the tip be rather flat or pointy? what works best?

2. whats a good way to practice?

3. Are there any typical beginner errors that one should be aware of?
#2
I actually had to deal with this the other day with my guitar. My best advice is to watch someone do it who knows what they are doing, because if you don't know what you're doing it can really screw up your guitar. :/

I was lucky enough to watch my dad do it cause he is good with that stuff, and I learned. Just remember if you are re-soldering something, you need to take off the old solder with a solder remover.

My best advice if there is nobody around who can teach you is to youtube it up! Good luck!
#3
A lower powered soldering iron (15W is super low) will give you much more leeway and will be much less inclined to burn out delicate components from overheating. The downside is that it takes forever to get the contacts hot enough for the solder to flow. Higher power makes the job much quicker/smoother, but if you keep the iron on the area for too long it will possibly ruin your circuitry. The tip type is really up to you. I like having a fine tip, because generally I work with small components, but spade tips definitely have their place.

There are tons of tutorials on the web, and they would probably help you a lot. As far as beginner errors, most people don't realize right away that you need to heat the METAL and not the solder. They try to just melt the solder on top of the cold metal, which will not form a connection at all. You have to heat both elements that you're trying to bond, and then touch the solder to the hot metal, not to the iron.
Quote by jimmy hendrix 2
Don't argue with my new deity.
#5
Quote by Kapoc
so the input jack in my guitar is damaged (the connection goes on and off if i move the cable a little), so i guess the wire is broken / soldering connection damaged and i want to repair it myself.

guess it shouldn't be too difficult, but i'm a beginner and have a couple of questions:

1. What Soldering Iron to use:
Does it make it easier / less likely to fail if you use one with a certain power (15w or so)?
should the tip be rather flat or pointy? what works best?

2. whats a good way to practice?

3. Are there any typical beginner errors that one should be aware of?


1. I use a 15 watt and it works fine
2. if you have used pots and wire you could practice with those
3. keep the soldering iron away from the guitar as in don't let it touch the body. it can burn the finish.

before you start, be sure to pull the wire's to the output jack (not too hard but not too soft) and see if any wires are loose or if they pop off easily. if they do, solder those ones back on and do the "test" again. that could be all you need to do
#7
I would recommend a hotter iron. I had all sorts of trouble using lower power stuff, it just makes it difficult. To me the hotter iron allows you to get in, solder and get out quicker and smoother making a better and cleaner joint.

Also, there's no way in hell a 15 watt iron will allow you to solder onto the back of a pot.
#9
Quote by wyldething
A lower powered soldering iron (15W is super low) will give you much more leeway and will be much less inclined to burn out delicate components from overheating. The downside is that it takes forever to get the contacts hot enough for the solder to flow. Higher power makes the job much quicker/smoother, but if you keep the iron on the area for too long it will possibly ruin your circuitry. The tip type is really up to you. I like having a fine tip, because generally I work with small components, but spade tips definitely have their place.

There are tons of tutorials on the web, and they would probably help you a lot. As far as beginner errors, most people don't realize right away that you need to heat the METAL and not the solder. They try to just melt the solder on top of the cold metal, which will not form a connection at all. You have to heat both elements that you're trying to bond, and then touch the solder to the hot metal, not to the iron.



Sorry no.
Its the opposite.
The longer the iron is there, the more likely it is for components to be damaged by heat.

Smaller tips for components, larger for jacks, switches.

Also, smaller diameter solder for PCBs. components and larger diameter for jacks is helpful.

A good tutorial can be found here : http://www.geofex.com/article_folders/how_to_solder.htm

There are also loads of youtube videos as well.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Mar 19, 2012,