#1
Alright, if I'm in G and want to go to Em, how would I change the tonal center and focus around it? To really make the listener hear that the song just took a dark turn or however you might say it. Also, would you use the same ways to go from say G to Em as you would if you wanted to go from E to Em or Em to E?
#2
E minor is the relative minor of G major so, it shouldn't be all that hard to get it to sound right.
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#4
Quote by srvfan2022
if you wanted to go from E to Em or Em to E?

For parallel modulation, try slash chords.

Em to E

Em - D/E - A/E - B7sus4 - E
----------
-8-7-5-5-5
-9-7-6-6-4
-9-7-7-7-6
-----------
-0-0-0-7-0
#5
Quote by chronowarp
Use a B7 to transition to Em.


This is the easiest way.

Rather than playing the B minor, play a B7. Then go directly to Em. Em will tend to now feel like the tonal center of the piece. However, often we find it easier to resolve to a major scale than a minor scale, so you need to be careful about using any G major chords until you want to go back to G - they'll have a tendency to pull the song back into G major.

To get back into G in a more definitive way, just hit a D7 then a G major.
#6
Quote by chronowarp
Use a B7 to transition to Em.


hi could you just explain why the B7 would be an effective way of doing this transition
#7
Quote by dvm25
hi could you just explain why the B7 would be an effective way of doing this transition


This is simply the easiest and most common modulation.

The Dom7 chord tends to say "I'm the fifth of something" (first because it only occurs one place in the major scale - the fifth - but also because it contains an internal tritone which wants to resolve.

In this case, B7 has a B, D#, F, and A.

D#-A is a tritone.
The D# is a leading tone to the E in Em, and the A resolves down to G in Em. Or something like that.

I've seen songs which just use the V of the new key, rather than the V7 when dealing with modulating between relative keys - eg, "Angie" by the Rolling Stones, uses an E major chord to force the tonal center to Am rather than the C major of the rest of the song.
#8
Quote by dvm25
hi could you just explain why the B7 would be an effective way of doing this transition

^ good post above on this...but...in my own words...

The strongest way to define a new tonic is with the dominant of that chord. In the case of Em the V is B7. B7 to Em is going to heavily tonicize the Em chord. Now in the key of G going to Em it's a pretty solid option since it's just a slight chromatic alteration within the key.

You have a Bm7...naturally occuring. So if you find a clever way to lead from Bm or substitute it entirely to B7, then you will have a pretty smooth modulatory tool to get from G to Em.