#1
So I went to my local pawn shop today and bought this nifty little guitar for $25. I don't have an acoustic so I figure it's a decent price.

I bought acoustic strings there too, and I got home and restrung it and realized that I'm kind of stupid, and this might be a nylon string and I could be ****ing it up. So I loosened the tension and took pics and am now here asking what type it is. It looks like a nylon I used to have (not huge on acoustics, only had 1 nylon before which I sold and one acoustic which I also sold). The neck is sort of thick, the tuners look like nylon tuners, but I've seen acoustic guitars with these types of tuners before so I'm not quite sure.

It's a no-name guitar, not one bit of info on it. Just some random black beat up guitar. The design around the sound hole got my attention as most nylons I've seen have that, and also the wide neck is furthering my suspicions of a nylon. I have tuned it with the bronze strings, and they were very hard to tune using the tuners. Lots of resistance.

But the bridge suggests an acoustic, as my nylon I used to have had a different one where you have to tie the strings.

Any help would be appreciated, thanks guys!






Quote by MetalGS3SE
This is the best idea I have ever heard. Ever.

Naedauuf for president people.


Last edited by naedauuf at Mar 19, 2012,
#2
Does it have a truss rod? If it does its steel string if not its nylon.
Quote by Lord_Doku
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Basically...
#3
That's kinda weird... At first I was gonna say it was a nylon string because of the headstock, but that's definitely a steel string bridge. The wide neck also suggests a nylon string like you said. The shape of the body also looks like that of a classical nylons string guitar. I have no idea why there would be a steel string bridge on a nylon string guitar though
#4
Quote by Jesse0315
Does it have a truss rod? If it does its steel string if not its nylon.

I don't believe it does, but aren't there some guitars where you need a special allen key to reach into the sound hole and turn it from inside the body? I can't see anything on the headstock, or through the sound hole, but maybe it might be where I can't see it? Or do those truss rods not exist and I'm delusional?
Quote by MetalGS3SE
This is the best idea I have ever heard. Ever.

Naedauuf for president people.


#5
Personally I'd check the bracing inside the guitar. I'm not too knowledgable about it, but it seems like the bracing would tell you if it could handle the tension or not.
My sig? Nice.
#6
100% Nylon.

19 frets, with the neck joint at the 12th fret

No bridge pins- you tie nylon strings.

Ball end strings exist, but I have not had the best experience with them.
#7
Quote by shreddymcshred
100% Nylon.

19 frets, with the neck joint at the 12th fret

No bridge pins- you tie nylon strings.

Ball end strings exist, but I have not had the best experience with them.


Yes! i agree 100% , but that is a weird bridge tho.....
!NYLONS KICK ASS!
#8
Quote by MonsterMetalMus
That's kinda weird... At first I was gonna say it was a nylon string because of the headstock, but that's definitely a steel string bridge. The wide neck also suggests a nylon string like you said. The shape of the body also looks like that of a classical nylons string guitar. I have no idea why there would be a steel string bridge on a nylon string guitar though
And in turn, have absolutely no idea why you've drawn the conclusion that is a steel string bridge. It's not.
#10
Couple of things: Both nylon-string or "classical" guitars and steel-string guitars are "acoustic"; that's a general term for non-electrified instruments.
Most classical guitars have the wide, plastic tuning posts so that the strings are not stressed as much. the presence of steel posts just indicates that it's a cheapie.
As well, those mother-of-toilet-seat dots on the bridge are concealing screws; another sign of cheap construction.
The dangers of applying steel strings to such guitars is that the bridge will pull up or even come off entirely.
However, you might get away with it. Some of these Asian instruments are very sturdy... We had a Suzuki classical that had been strung with steel about 35 years ago when neither of us knew anything... Thing played just fine for several years.
#11
Quote by Captaincranky
And in turn, have absolutely no idea why you've drawn the conclusion that is a steel string bridge. It's not.



I assumed it was a steel string bridge because the strings were fed through it and held in place by the ball ends. I've never seen nylon strings with ball ends, so that is why I drew the conclusion that it has a steel string bridge. If nylon strings exist for a bridge like that then I've never seen them, but that's not all that surprising seeing as I don't own or play nylon string guitars.