#1
Well I've learned the major and minor pentatonics as well as the blue scale in all of their positions. Now I'm pretty stuck on what to do next theory wise.
Which way do you think I should go if I mostly play classic rock and blues?
Thanks.
#2
Well, you could learn more scales, like the minor and major in a non-pentatonic format, learn modes, etc.
#3
The notes' position on the fretboard, major/minor scales, and how to form chords.
Quote by synestershadows
Shai Hulud mother****er.
#5
Put that shit to work!!! Put on songs and just solo through the whole thing to practice actually using all those scales. There are a lot of people who learn new stuff but never get out of the practice phase with it because they don't learn how to apply it.
#6
Can start learning the different modes, how to link up arpeggios by learning how to form chords and progressions to put them in, phrasing of lead work, blah blah blah blah
The world doesn't revolve around you. If it does, beware. You're probably about to pass out drunk.

The 19 year old who knows his stuff. Most of the time.
#7
**** pets, and do the whole thing, check out some twelve not split patterns a la rusty cooley, natural, harmonic and melodic minor, but more importantly

APPLYING YOUR KNOWLEDGE TO SOLOING AND MUSIC AND SHIT.
#8
Quote by bic wang
Well I've learned the major and minor pentatonics as well as the blue scale in all of their positions. Now I'm pretty stuck on what to do next theory wise.
Which way do you think I should go if I mostly play classic rock and blues?
Thanks.


Let me ask you this:

What happens when you try to use those scales?

Can you apply them dynamically, use them to create beautiful solos, and improvise? How's your ear?

If you're learning this stuff faster than you can apply it in a way that creates music, then you're not doing yourself any favors. Focus on your ear and your ability to apply this stuff before rushing out to learn more.

Do you like the solos you can create in the major and minor pentatonic? What do you wish you could do that you can't do?
#9
I reccommend that instead of trying to memorize more scales, you could work on alternate picking the scales you know, improving your vibrato, just working on stuff to make the scales you know.
Fender American Standard Telecaster
Vox Night Train 15W
An ever-morphing BOSS and MXR loaded pedalboard

"I eats more chicken any man ever seen!"
-Howlin' Wolf
#10
learn more about chord progressions and being able to work your way through them, either with scales or just playing the changes themselves, at steady tempos. practice more rhythms. for blues stuff you can always learn the different kind of sub chords you can do.
Fender Strat Deluxe
Fender MexiStrat
Epiphone Sheritan
Ibanez Artcore
Fender Twin Reverb silverface
Roland JC120
Pedals

Quote by CaptainAmerican
I would recommend the marshal MG100

Very versatile and quality sound. It should treat you well
#11
Quote by Dr. Koolaide
Put that shit to work!!! Put on songs and just solo through the whole thing to practice actually using all those scales. There are a lot of people who learn new stuff but never get out of the practice phase with it because they don't learn how to apply it.

+1. Good post, doctor.
#12
Quote by Dr. Koolaide
Put that shit to work!!! Put on songs and just solo through the whole thing to practice actually using all those scales. There are a lot of people who learn new stuff but never get out of the practice phase with it because they don't learn how to apply it.

Quote by mdc
+1. Good post, doctor.

+1 and I'll raise you 1...

Get on YouTube and find some backing tracks and apply what you've learned... Still Lots more to do besides the book work..

Have Fun!!!
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#13
Quote by bic wang
Well I've learned the major and minor pentatonics as well as the blue scale in all of their positions. Now I'm pretty stuck on what to do next theory wise.
Which way do you think I should go if I mostly play classic rock and blues?
Thanks.


Learning positions =/= learning theory.
#14
Quote by bic wang
Well I've learned the major and minor pentatonics as well as the blue scale in all of their positions. Now I'm pretty stuck on what to do next theory wise.
Which way do you think I should go if I mostly play classic rock and blues?
Thanks.


I would take lessons rather than trying piece together random advice. Theory is something you want to learn from the very beginning, and then build a foundation from there. If you can't take lessons, you could at least invest in a book, and follow it chapter to chapter.
shred is gaudy music
#15
GuitarMunky, I am taking lessons but for the past month or so I couldn't take them because m teacher's been dealing with some personal things so yeah. I'll be sure to ask for some guidance when I get back.

Thanks guys
And I have been applying these, before posting this I've been working on improvising on backing tracks for about a month and I've created some nice licks
And my ear has always been pretty good because since I was 5 I was taking piano lessons and every time I would have this ear test thing.
I'll look into learning modes. and Slashiepie, are scales theory? :s