#1
Hey guys,

I am new to this forum, yet, I thought, well...If I'm going to ask people who are quite guitar orientated then this would be the perfect place.

I've been playing guitar on-and-off for two months, I'm definitely below average. Within this amount of time I've taught myself a few chords...I'll list them below:

A Maj, A Min, A7
B Maj, B Min, B7
C Maj, C Min, C7
D Maj, D Min, D7
E Maj, E Min, E7
F Maj, F Min, F7
G Maj, G Min, G7

Even though I have learned these chords to a fairly good technique, I cannot really play anything "Note Worthy" or "Nice Sounding", etc. Which chords do you suggest I learn from now on, such as C-Sharp-7,etc...or rather, Barre chords...or A pentatonic scale? Etc.

Many thanks and Kind Regards,

- Joshua.
#2
I think you would be better off learning how to use those chords rather than learning extended ones. With that palate you could create plenty of "nice sounding" though quite likely no longer "note worthy" works.

Begin to learn the concept of key. C major, for example contains seven chords. C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am and B diminished. You already know all of those chords AND even the 7th which could come in handy. Try limiting yourself to using those chords and see what you can come up with. Start with playing with F to G to Am, that's quite common and rather nice sounding or even more common, C major to F Major to G Major back to C.
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#3
Learn theory properly: learn to build your own chords from scales. You'll be an infinitely better musician for it.
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#4
Hey guys, thank you so much! Already, the help has been fantastic! Okay, I'll definitely try playing with the supplied chords I already know. Yet, sorry for my eagerness...Once I've learned quite a few nice sounding guitar licks...would you say I learn Barre Chords or A certain sort of scale...(If so, which scale would you suggest? Ie; the Pentatonic, Chromatic?).

I'm really excited now, guys!

Many thanks,

- Joshua.
#6
Just to let you guys know, the chords I mentioned in my first post refers to only one variation of say, Major,Minor a 7th Chords...I can only play those chords on the first 4 frets of the guitar neck. I haven't learned any of the variations of the A Major - G Major, A-Minor - G Minor, A7 - G7...for example...an A Major on the 5-6-7th frets...etc. Should I learn the other variations?

Sorry for the lack of fluency in my articulation.

Many thanks and Take Care!

- Joshua.
#7
Learn the notes on the fretboard and learn the CAGED system. Using it, you won't have to memorize where each chord is. As long as you know where the root notes of the chord are on the fretboard, you will be able to play: 12(notes) X 5 (chord shapes) X 3+ (major, minor, 7 etc.) that many chords.

Lets say you only take the natural(no sharps or flats) notes and only the major and minor chords. 7 X 5 X 2 = You'd be able to at least play 70 chords. 7 Different chords in either major or minor and 5 variations each.
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#8
More than anything else, what you need to do is start learning some songs
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#9
Quote by Johnnymarrking
Just to let you guys know, the chords I mentioned in my first post refers to only one variation of say, Major,Minor a 7th Chords...I can only play those chords on the first 4 frets of the guitar neck. I haven't learned any of the variations of the A Major - G Major, A-Minor - G Minor, A7 - G7...for example...an A Major on the 5-6-7th frets...etc. Should I learn the other variations?

Sorry for the lack of fluency in my articulation.

Many thanks and Take Care!

- Joshua.

I believe you know this already, but those are barre chords you're referring to.

I notice in the list of chords that you've provided that you're able to play B and F, which means you're already able to play barre chords.

With that in mind, you've already "learned" how to play barre chords, so the next step would be to learn:
- How barre chords relate to each other
- How chords are constructed

Learning how to obtain the chords for a given key (i.e the aforementioned "harmonizing a scale") would be good, but I don't think you will be able to see immediate benefits from learning that. If you have an interest and the time, sure, go nuts, but otherwise I'd put that as low priority.

When I was talking about the relation between barre chords, I'm talking about something like this:
You have a B major chord. You keep the barre shape, and move it up from the second fret to the third fret. You now have a C major chord. Move it up from the third fret to the fourth fret, and you have a C# major chord. This works the same for minor chords.

I wouldn't recommend relying on only this, because all things considered, this is just a shortcut. Ultimately, learning how to construct chords would be better. ZeGuitarist's series of articles on this website gives a guided approach to music theory, moving from the 7 notes of music to chord construction and beyond:
http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/ZeGuitarist/contributions/columns/

If you'd like to skip ahead, #13 would be the article on chord construction.
#10
Learn the notes of the fretboard, learn some scales, and learn how to construct chords from scales.
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#11
Quote by steven seagull
More than anything else, what you need to do is start learning some songs

This. It's a lot easier to determine which chords and techniques you need to learn by actually trying to learn the music you want to play and seeing what techniques you fall short with.
#12
You may know these chords already, but be sure you learn the basic open chords, not just barre chords. So, G, C, D, etc... If you aren't familiar with open chords here is a link:

http://www.guitaralliance.com/guitar_lessons/guitar_chords/common_open_chords.htm

With the chords you know already and the basic open ones you can play plenty of songs. Just keep in mind, making the guitar sound good requires just as much skill with your strumming hand as your fretting hand. You also may want to ask people about what a good beginner song would be in your style and work on that.