#1
As of now, my floyd rose bridge is set up for E-standard. So I have a few questions here.

1: Will tuning the low E to D knock the bridge out of whack? Or should it stay flat?
2: Will loosening 1 locking nut knock the other strings out of tune?
3: If I wanted to tune the guitar to Eb, will the bridge require adjustment?
#2
1. Yes, Floyd Roses are designed for standard tunings (doesn't matter if it's E or D or C...)
Only way to droptune one is by stabilizing it in someway (so you can't pull op the bridge anymore. For this you can put a wood block behind it, or put a little tool called the Tremol-No between the spring. With that, you can switch between dive-only mode and fully floating. But for drop tuning it must be stabilized. So you have to make a choice between drop tuning and pullups...

2. Not necessarily, but why? You'd only open them when changing strings...

3. Retuning a Floyd Rose to a completely different tuning will require some tweaking, yes. If you've already strung and tuned it in E, just loosen the locking nuts and tune it to Eb with the normal tuners and the fine tuners. The bridge will probably tilt one way or another, so turn a few screws in the back to adjust it. But I recommend you to keep it in a single tuning.

(Note: stabilizing removes the ability of pullups, but it makes detuning much easier because there is almost no more tweaking with the springs. Make your choice!)
#3
1. it should stay flat for the most part
2. not that i remember
3. possibly, what gauge string your using will influence that the most

what i do to go from standard to drop D is when i tune the guitar i set the low E's fine tuning screw in almost the whole way (leaving enough room to tune) and then when i go to drop D just unscrewing the fine tune screw until its good
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#4
The bridge will probably tilt one way or another, so turn a few screws in the back to adjust it. But I recommend you to keep it in a single tuning.
#5
Quote by kiwiug
1. Yes, Floyd Roses are designed for standard tunings (doesn't matter if it's E or D or C...)
Only way to droptune one is by stabilizing it in someway (so you can't pull op the bridge anymore. [...] So you have to make a choice between drop tuning and pullups...


This is a lie. My guitar has a Floyd Rose and is currently tuned in Drop C, and I can pull the bridge all the way up perfectly.

(Note: stabilizing removes the ability of pullups,


And this is another lie. Stabilizing means getting it parallel to the body of the guitar so that it doesn't go out of tune. What you mean is blocking, which is a different thing that serves a different purpose.
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Last edited by Mr Winters at Mar 20, 2012,
#6
Quote by Mr Winters
And this is another lie. Stabilizing means getting it parallel to the body of the guitar so that it doesn't go out of tune. What you mean is blocking, which is a different thing that serves a different purpose.


I didn't quite get what kiwiug was saying at first, but I think he meant blocking the trem, which in my opinion, completely renders it useless and why have one in the first place.

1. Yes
2. No, but you might notice the strings that were locked might be out of tune
3. Yes

I just put my guitar from standard to Eb, and while this is pretty minor it still requires slight adjustment of the claw screws. If I'm changing tunings with my OFR, I personally find it easiest to pre-emptively loosen the screws (if you're tuning down) by making an educated guess on how much to loosen. Otherwise, I find you end up doing this annoying tension fight between the springs and strings. Of course, if your guess is really off, you still might have this. But it comes with experience
#7
Quote by Darth Usurper

1: Will tuning the low E to D knock the bridge out of whack? Or should it stay flat?


Downtuning will cause the bridge to pull back. Therefore, you will probably also need to slightly loosen the springs in the back to bring the bridge back to the level position.

Quote by Darth Usurper

2: Will loosening 1 locking nut knock the other strings out of tune?


Depends on how much you've used the fine tuners after locking it. If the tension between the bridge and nut doesn't match the one between the nut and the tuning keys, then releasing the lock will cause the tension to rebalance, therefore possibly detuning the strings. If they do detune however, it shouldn't be by much.


Quote by Darth Usurper

3: If I wanted to tune the guitar to Eb, will the bridge require adjustment?



Yes, the overall tension exerted by the strings will be lower, so, as before, the bridge will pull back.
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#8
Changing anything on a guitar, especially a locking trem system, will make everything get all whacky.
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#9
1. Yes, and it will make all of your other strings go sharp. The Floyd system is a SYSTEM, and is designed to work as a unit, therefore any changes affect the entire system.

Honestly if you have to ask these questions, you aren't ready to mess with it...
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#10
Are you planning to play in drop d or drop c# all the time? Or is this something you're going to do once in a while in a home environment?

If it's for occasional home use, I'd just not worry about it. You should be able to set up the fine tuner on the low E so that you can do drop tuning without having to unlock the but. If you're not worried about intonation or bridge angle being a little off, than I wouldn't do anything else. Dropping won't have a huge affect on the other strings, but you'll probably have to re-tune.

If you going to stay in drop tuning, then go through the steps to get it done right. Adjust the spring claw, check the intonation and action.

If you're talking about playing live and want to switch? Get a 2nd guitar.

And #2 in your list, I wouldn't do that. With a full floating bridge, having your E & A strings go massively out of tune with wild whammy bar use will probably be enough to throw everything else out. But like I said above, if it's home use, then you just take the 60s and just tune up. On stage or at a jam, I'd not want to deal with that at all :P

When I only owned 1 guitar, I'd switch between E and Eb without messing with the bridge angle. Was it the best way to handle it? No, but it didn't hurt anything. Same for dropping to D or C#. But since the jams I did were usually drunken messes, nobody really was too picky about perfection Now that I have more guitars, I have different ones for different tunings. So much easier to deal with. Have the s540 set to a440, the rg3570z @ old Metallica A438, the s470 Eb and the rga121 fixed bridge for drop tuning. Has a slightly higher cost tho GAS can be dangerous to the wallet!
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#11
Quote by Darth Usurper
As of now, my floyd rose bridge is set up for E-standard. So I have a few questions here.

1: Will tuning the low E to D knock the bridge out of whack? Or should it stay flat?
2: Will loosening 1 locking nut knock the other strings out of tune?
3: If I wanted to tune the guitar to Eb, will the bridge require adjustment?


1. Yes.

2. Not unless you detune one of the strings.

3. Yes. You'd have to either tighten the trem claw or add another spring to balance the tension. How much you adjust is trial and error. You'll have to follow these steps over and over until the bridge is correctly aligned;

Screw in claw screws a half/whole turn
Tune all strings
Check bridge alignment

Rinse and repeat. If you end up with no adjustment left, you need another spring. In that case, screw the claw back to where it was, put the extra spring in, and follow the above steps.
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#12
Wait wait wait. I have a kraller bridge, and rose floyd. So, do I really have to go all that crap just to tune to a dropped tuning?
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#13
Quote by Iblis92
Wait wait wait. I have a kraller bridge, and rose floyd. So, do I really have to go all that crap just to tune to a dropped tuning?


Sometimes cheaper Floyds aren't sensitive enought to notice the difference, especially if you don't touch the bra, but fot the most part yes, otherwise it'll go out of tune.
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#14
Quote by biga29
Sometimes cheaper Floyds aren't sensitive enought to notice the difference, especially if you don't touch the bra, but fot the most part yes, otherwise it'll go out of tune.

Well, mine isnt cheap at all...
Would I have to worry about this if i was going into drop D? (its only downtuning one string so...)
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#15
Quote by Iblis92
Well, mine isnt cheap at all...
Would I have to worry about this if i was going into drop D? (its only downtuning one string so...)


Short Answer: Yes

Long Answer : Yes

Think of your Floyd as the fulcrum of a lever (because, you know, that's exactly what it is...) that needs to be evenly balanced to work properly. If you change the 'weight' (tension) on one end, it goes out of balance until you change the weight the proper amount on the other end. Since you are in effect working with springs on both ends, it takes a bit of back-and-forth to find the proper balance.

Detuning from an E to a D changes the overall tension by about 3.5lbs, which means there is now an 'extra' 3.5# from the springs pulling the rest of the strings sharp. So you loosen the claw a bit, which removes that extra tension, but now although your other strings are back in tune, your D is a bit flat, so you tighten it up, which adds a bit more tension and makes the rest of the strings a bit flat, so you tighten the claw, they come in tune, but now your D is sharp....and so on until balance, and tuning, is achieved.

It's not that hard, and with practice doesn't even take that long, but it IS a process...
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