#1
Hey! I've been looking for people to form a band with, and have finally got in touch with people ... all we need now is a place to practice and it's going to be hard, because the drummer's drumset is so big. But anyway ...

I don't really know how to approach this. I thought maybe everyone could meet for a beer or something and discuss a little on what we want to do and stuff? I mean, for example, I switch "favourite" band at least one time a week xD So I thought it would be a good idea to discuss if we should start with covers, or if everyone wants to write own material, and how we should form our style and such.

Personally I draw influence from every metal genre, and want to combine stuff and do everything in my power to not sound like someone else... So do you think it's a good idea or, maybe you have some tips on getting started as a band?

Thanks!
Quote by carlos_almighty
You just wanna try it? My philosophy is, "If it makes you curious, try it at least once."


Also: "Time you enjoy wasting, is not wasted!"
#2
Just get togetter at preferably the drummers house, everyone bring their (bass)guitar and just Jam a little bit, if it works out the "forming a band" process happends by itself!

Good luck!
#3
Quote by TTeddybear
Just get togetter at preferably the drummers house, everyone bring their (bass)guitar and just Jam a little bit, if it works out the "forming a band" process happends by itself!

Good luck!


Yeah, that could work too ... thanks! :P
Quote by carlos_almighty
You just wanna try it? My philosophy is, "If it makes you curious, try it at least once."


Also: "Time you enjoy wasting, is not wasted!"
#4
My personal experience tells that meeting for a beer is a good start, there you can talk it through about what each of you expect of the band and where you want to go with it.

If the drummer can't move his drum set, then rehearse at his house, or find a place to practice that already have a drum set, a good idea is to set a goal like set up a small gig 4 month in advance so you really force yourselves to work this through!

also make sure that everyone practices as much as they can, and if you have a member that is weak on his instrument.. make sure he practices so much that he knows his stuff, and tell him if he don't! - from personal experience is the most important thing that you can communicate between yourself if it's a reprimand or telling that they are doing good
#5
Quote by mpv3000
My personal experience tells that meeting for a beer is a good start, there you can talk it through about what each of you expect of the band and where you want to go with it.

If the drummer can't move his drum set, then rehearse at his house, or find a place to practice that already have a drum set, a good idea is to set a goal like set up a small gig 4 month in advance so you really force yourselves to work this through!

also make sure that everyone practices as much as they can, and if you have a member that is weak on his instrument.. make sure he practices so much that he knows his stuff, and tell him if he don't! - from personal experience is the most important thing that you can communicate between yourself if it's a reprimand or telling that they are doing good


Thanks for the advices! What you say really makes sence, haha, and I agree that practicing is important! We know ourselves that we aren't exactly theory masters and it's just for fun, really :P But thank you!
Quote by carlos_almighty
You just wanna try it? My philosophy is, "If it makes you curious, try it at least once."


Also: "Time you enjoy wasting, is not wasted!"
#6
You need to make sure that everyone is on the right page. So what are everyone's goals? They need to be similar. Also, decide whether you are originals or covers before you start practising. You need to be one or the other, not both. You also need to know what else is going to affect peoples ability to practice (e.g. work, family, other bands etc.). This means you can work out if there is going to be a convenient time for all to practice. You also need to know about everybody's travelling arrangements

You can do this over beer if you wish. I do it over email. Then I've got all the info I need that I can revisit.
#7
Quote by Myshadow46_2
You need to make sure that everyone is on the right page. So what are everyone's goals? They need to be similar. Also, decide whether you are originals or covers before you start practising. You need to be one or the other, not both. You also need to know what else is going to affect peoples ability to practice (e.g. work, family, other bands etc.). This means you can work out if there is going to be a convenient time for all to practice. You also need to know about everybody's travelling arrangements

You can do this over beer if you wish. I do it over email. Then I've got all the info I need that I can revisit.


Yep that's more along the lines I was thinking.

Every now and then someone goes "hey wanna make a band? let's meet over a beer and chat". It puts me off. Why? Well I'll give you a little test.

Question 1

Are you looking for band mates or drinking buddies?


The quiz ends here.

Now I don't want you all getting up in arms going "but what if I don't like the guy?". I can assure you that if you don't like someone, you'll figure it out pretty quickly regardless of whether you're having a beer with them or whether they're playing guitar. But I'll add another question to that; "does it matter?".

Do you have to be best friends with a co-worker to work together? Err, no. You just need to do your jobs and have the basic level of co-operation required to execute it (ie. i do this, you do this). Even if you don't particularly like the guy, you only have to see each other during work hours so you know there's an end in sight.

And a band is the same. You play this part, I play this part. All good. Everyone does the job and you don't have to see each other until next practice or gig. If you guys become friends along the way, well that's great, but it's not required to make a band.

So what does this have to do with starting a band? Well you need to make sure that you can get that basic level of co-operation, and that they have the skills required to execute the task. By asking guys out for a beer, you're just proving they can drink and chat to eachother. You don't even know if they can play instruments. It's really a waste of time to me.

What then do you do?

Well myshadow above gave some good pointers, which should have been established earlier but hey you're new to this so we'll give you some slack.

1. Are you an originals band or a covers band? Can't be both.

2. Commitment to practice. Once a week should be fine.

3. If you're an originals band, write up some simple chord progressions and simply jam them out. Or preferably if someone has a full song already written, have them teach it to the band, and everyone tries that out.

4. If you're a covers band, pick 3 covers to do. Tell them which covers to do before practice so everyone can learn at home. When you get together you play them.


As you're new at this, your tolerance for skill levels and results/preparation for this first practice may be different than mine. For example I have kicked out people on the first practice (usually an audition) for not learning the songs ahead of time. I have also kicked people out for not being able to read chord sheets, or just playing not well enough.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
+1 to alan and myshadow.

I see threads on here all the time where a band was formed to play covers, but one guy doesn't like covers, and is always trying to throw his original pieces in the mix. And vice versa. Make sure everyone wants to go in the same direction. Pressing forward with someone who doesn't share the same goals as the rest can be a mistake that will cause drama later. If someone isn't into covers, they're unlikely to change their mind later.

Sometimes the best way to write new stuff is to just jam. Maybe come up with a little riff or chord progression like Alan said, and just play. Keep playing it over and over, and see what comes out of it.

If you have any means of recording your jam sessions, even better. You can record rough ideas, and work on them outside of practice. My old band practiced at my house, and I would record our new song ideas. After practice I would track it, and do several versions,then email them to the other guitar player. So by our next practice we had a lot of progress made, and the drummer was awesome so he could just pick up on what we were playing on the fly.
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And so it goes
Last edited by jpatan at Mar 21, 2012,