#1
OK, iv been playing Guitar, Piano and any other instument i could get my hands on for awhile now and i would like to start recording, my question and im sure it has been asked a thousand times is what do i need to start doing this? i dont want to spend thousands as its just for me and i am just learning, are there any specific recording devices that will be beneficial for me to have? i play both electric and accoustic guitar and these will be what i am recording, i was looking at a Boss BR 80 (http://www.bossus.com/gear/productdetails.php?ProductId=1167) has anyone used one? is it worth it? basically im looking for help on anything that will help me learn what i need to know.
#2
Probably the simplest is a computer with some kind of DAW and a USB microphone, because it'll make it very easy to do multitrack recordings, if you plan on playing off of those instruments of the same song, that is.
#4
Dont really have one, im in no rush so i can lay buy almost anything i need if its abit to pricey to pay for straight up but i would like to keep costs down why i am still learning.

with the USB Mic is there any software thatll work best with that and how will that go with the electric guitars??
#5
The easiest way to start recording is definitely by using a multitracker as your DAW.

If you wanted to get into recording as a serious hobby & potential career, you'd need to go with software, but for someone who just wants to be able to record themselves at home that can be a bit of a pain as it has a much steeper learning curve.

Multitrackers can do pretty much everything that software DAWs can, they're easier to use and you have everything in a single purpose built unit.

Boss are often more expensive than other brands (such as Fostex, Zoom and Tascam, so you may find you can get higher spec kit by looking at them instead. The BR80 you linked to is fairly basic, you'd probably be better off getting the BR800 which has much better spec.

I used a Fostex 8 track for years and it did everything I ever needed it to and more, I only upgraded because I wanted a few more tracks to play with. Now I use a Tascam 2488 MkII and it is excellent - from what I've heard it's actually better than the 2488 Neo that replaced it in Tascam's range. I'd definitely recommend looking at either Fostex or Tascam's range before you make your final decision.
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#6
Thank you for the help,

I just had a quick look at the BR800 and it looks like a sound product, i would like to avoid using a DAW as im just trying to keep it simple at the moment. are there any particular Fostex or Tascam models that are worth looking at?
#7
i would argue that multitrackers are not necessarily easier to use than software if you just want to do basic recording. just open a program, set the correct input device, arm the track and push a button. you have to do essentially the same thing for a basic recording with a multitracker. it might have more of a learning curve for some things (especially to anyone more used to a hands on approach), but for basic stuff, most DAWs are straight forward. now, multitrackers do have their benefits, and if thats the way you want go, go for it. but to say that they are significantly easier to use and easier to get started on, well, i would completely disagree with that.
#8
Quote by TheMattman1991
Thank you for the help,

I just had a quick look at the BR800 and it looks like a sound product, i would like to avoid using a DAW as im just trying to keep it simple at the moment. are there any particular Fostex or Tascam models that are worth looking at?

The Fostex I had for a few years was a VF-80. It's not in production anymore, their current range is the MR-8. If you were to get into recording a bit more seriously, you'd probably out grow it, but it's designed for beginners to be able to use it quickly and has a good range of options to provide you with all the capability you'll need for reasonable quality recordings:
http://www.e-av.co.uk/fostex-mr8-mkii-multitrack-recorder-free-2gb-sd-card

Tascam's main multitrackers are the DP004, DP008 and 2488. The 2488 would probably be a bit more than you'd need right now, but it would be the best longer term investment. I'd never recommend anyone spent their money on a 4 track, so I'd guess the DP008 would be the best option for you here:
http://www.dolphinmusic.co.uk/product/42604-tascam-dp-008-portable-8-track-recorder.html
I've never used this particular model, but having used a few other Tascams over the years they're usually well built, reliable and easy enough to learn.

BTW - so you know, using a multitracker isn't avoiding using a DAW - it stands for Digital Audio Workstation, and was originally coined to describe the digital multitrackers like those I've recommended. The software equivalent are now also referred to as DAWs, but it shouldn't be used as a way to separate software from hardware.
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#9
Ok, so thanks for all the help, im looking at the Boss BR 800, i like the features it has aswell as the user friendly interface that some other systems seem to lack. can anyone offer any reviews regarding it?
#10
I've never tried it, but here's one:
http://www.musicradar.com/gear/all/recording/multitrack-recorders/br-800-digital-multitracker-278725/review

4.5 stars, so it's a pretty good choice.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
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