#1
Hey guys,

Currently my band is established in NE Ohio in the states, and we've noticed that there isn't as big of a music scene as we would like.

We know that 3/4 of our members are pretty powerful with the vote to move to a very music savy state. Specefically we would want to re locate to Austin, TX or Cali.

Any residents of the two want to confirm if it would be an intelligent decision?

It's basically either save up money for the next year for a touring vehicle or re locate and build a fanbase down there.

Thanks
#2
Go to school and get a real job. You'll thank me later.

But seriously, you do realize how saturated this industry is right? Unless music is what you love doing, I don't know how you expect to afford to live just off your music and also being new in a city, buy food, pay for transportation, even if you guys were playing shows every night. And being noticed and making it big is basically luck of the draw but... To each his own.
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Last edited by AthenasGhost at Mar 20, 2012,
#3
I'm not from the USA, but I'd say you'd need to be really serious before moving such a distance away from home/family and friends. (I'm assuming you're all native to Ohio). Whilst Texas and California have bigger scenes, they'll also have way more competition and the performance standard will be a lot higher. This might cause you problems which you don't have in Ohio. Could you not just move to a more populated place in Ohio, like Cinncinati or Columbus first, and try to build a bigger fanbase there? If that works, then think about branching out. Walk before you run and all that.
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#4
How established is your band really? Are you the top band in the city? In the State?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
Quote by AthenasGhost

But seriously, you do realize how saturated this industry is right? Unless music is what you love doing, I don't know how you expect to afford to live just off your music and also being new in a city, buy food, pay for transportation, even if you guys were playing shows every night. And being noticed and making it big is basically luck of the draw but... To each his own.


Exactly. You want to jump into a crowd of another 1000 bands exactly like you?

If you want to relocate do it objectively and choose a place that's not over crowded but is diverse. I love the S. East and my position just because I'm centered and have big 9 BIG cities less than 4 hours a way, 15 or so medium sized cities and then all the small towns around them within just a couple hours. Makes doing long localized tours very easy

I'd advocate finding something similar. A central hub to spread from.

And like Alan said, are you the best band in Ohio right now? If not I wouldn't even suggest trying to compete with the sharks out in LA. Give me a link to your page and I'll be happy to judge.

You would literally have to hand me a million dollars for me to go out there, it's just not worth it.
#6
Either way, it is a gamble. You're either going to make it or you aren't, no matter where you are. Except your odds of "making it" are better in a place like NY or LA.

Sure, people will say, "why do you want to go to a city and compete with 1000 other bands just like you?" The clear answer to that is, if you can't compete in LA or NY, then you're not going to be able to compete internationally. Being the best band in Ohio or Nevada or Pennsylvania is not near good enough.

What are your goals?

See, if you're serious about "making it", you pretty well have to be prepared to risk everything, recognizing that the odds are stacked against you. Small risk = small payout (or small loss). Big risk = big payout (or big loss.) In this case, you're either going big or going home.

The advantage of going to NY or LA is that you need to know whether or not you can compete. You HAVE to be able to compete. You can learn from the best. Also, you're not likely to meet Bob Rock or Quincy Jones in Ohio. I mean, what the hell would either of them be doing there? On the other hand, if you're in LA, you just might. Hey, they gotta get gas somewhere, right? They gotta buy their toilet paper somewhere, right?

So, you go there and network, network, network until you work your way into the next circle, and "lather, rinse, repeat" as you work your way up the circles. Eventually, you'll be invited by some bass player to some party that Trent Reznor happens to be at and he will hear your stuff and want to introduce you to Dave Grohl who will hook you up.

Or more likely, you'll play the same crappy stages over and over again, each time with fewer and fewer people noticing or giving a crap. Your band will break up and you will join another that will implode in six months, and then another that will attract some label interest until the lead singer throws in the towel because his girlfriend got pregnant. You'll be in five other bands along the way, meet some kinda cool people, release a couple of independent CD's - one that will sell a couple thousand copies and show some promise and two others that nobody will ever notice. You'll open up for some band that includes "ex members of Warrant" and maybe even get asked to open for the new band that Vince Neil's best friend is in. After fifteen years, you'll head back to Ohio. You'll be 35, have no employable skills, have no relevant work experience and no education. You'll have some good stories, though, and you'll be able to say you gave it a go.

You'll go back to college to gain some work-related skills, being about 15 years older than anyone else in your class, for the most part and constantly have to endure a string of "I told you so"'s.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Well that's a dream crusher.
Save up for a tour vehicle and tour as heavily as possible.
None of your favorite bands got anywhere being scared to fail and I'm sure they all heard everything that axemanchris typed. It's true that there will be difficulties along the way; who can fully prepare for the future? But at very least you can say you tried to make the most of you talent. I'd say go for it and never stop going for it for as long as you possibly can.
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#9
Quote by sonny bb
Well that's a dream crusher.




Didn't mean it to be. It can happen, and it does happen. Hey, someone has to win the lottery, right?

Sure, your odds of winning the music industry lotto are roughly akin to getting struck by lightning, but every year, people around the world get struck by lightning.

Like getting struck by lightning, you can increase or decrease your odds. Hide in your basement every time it rains, and you can damned well bet that you'll never get hit. Go to the top of the Empire State Building every time the skies darken, wearing an aluminum suit and a telescopic copper rod that you can hold 200 feet into the air, and I can almost bet that within a year or two, you'll get hit.

Just like music, the more you put yourself on the line and get yourself above the crowd, the more likely you are to get hit.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Also of note is that once you "make it", the chances you'll (a) make money or (b) stay famous forever are still slim. One only needs to look at the charts now to notice that there's many "new bands" on the charts, and they'll most likely never appear on the charts again once their "in album" is over. At this point they get chucked in the "yesterday's news" pile and you still end up with nothing except stories.

On the other hand, there's only so much you can take from rambling on the internet. I personally was never tempted to try to "make it", because I'm perfectly comfortable having music as my "fun thing to do", rather than my career or source of income. If you're really keen, I say just go do it. If it sounds like too much work, well, you won't make it because there's someone a lot more dedicated than you.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
Quote by axemanchris
Either way, it is a gamble. You're either going to make it or you aren't, no matter where you are. Except your odds of "making it" are better in a place like NY or LA.

Sure, people will say, "why do you want to go to a city and compete with 1000 other bands just like you?" The clear answer to that is, if you can't compete in LA or NY, then you're not going to be able to compete internationally. Being the best band in Ohio or Nevada or Pennsylvania is not near good enough.

What are your goals?

See, if you're serious about "making it", you pretty well have to be prepared to risk everything, recognizing that the odds are stacked against you. Small risk = small payout (or small loss). Big risk = big payout (or big loss.) In this case, you're either going big or going home.

The advantage of going to NY or LA is that you need to know whether or not you can compete. You HAVE to be able to compete. You can learn from the best. Also, you're not likely to meet Bob Rock or Quincy Jones in Ohio. I mean, what the hell would either of them be doing there? On the other hand, if you're in LA, you just might. Hey, they gotta get gas somewhere, right? They gotta buy their toilet paper somewhere, right?

So, you go there and network, network, network until you work your way into the next circle, and "lather, rinse, repeat" as you work your way up the circles. Eventually, you'll be invited by some bass player to some party that Trent Reznor happens to be at and he will hear your stuff and want to introduce you to Dave Grohl who will hook you up.

Or more likely, you'll play the same crappy stages over and over again, each time with fewer and fewer people noticing or giving a crap. Your band will break up and you will join another that will implode in six months, and then another that will attract some label interest until the lead singer throws in the towel because his girlfriend got pregnant. You'll be in five other bands along the way, meet some kinda cool people, release a couple of independent CD's - one that will sell a couple thousand copies and show some promise and two others that nobody will ever notice. You'll open up for some band that includes "ex members of Warrant" and maybe even get asked to open for the new band that Vince Neil's best friend is in. After fifteen years, you'll head back to Ohio. You'll be 35, have no employable skills, have no relevant work experience and no education. You'll have some good stories, though, and you'll be able to say you gave it a go.

You'll go back to college to gain some work-related skills, being about 15 years older than anyone else in your class, for the most part and constantly have to endure a string of "I told you so"'s.

CT


What do you think of the idea of just doing a small "tour" out there, if you could afford it? So your still competing in a better market, meeting connections, and your just not recycling the same show and people every 2 weeks.

I haven't been out there myself, but just throwing this out there as an idea. If you knew a friend out there where you could at least crash, you could get out there for say 2 weeks, play a couple of shows and go back. Take a train and keep it cheap, and you can at least get some exposure.

And LA aside, Ohio is close enough to NY City. You could get there in a day find a cheap hotel to stay for a week play a few shows and head on back.
#12
I'm from Northeast Ohio, too. And while the music scene isn't exactly hopping, it's an easy place to live while you play shows elsewhere. Get that touring vehicle instead.

And just curious, what's your band called?
#13
Quote by axemanchris


Didn't mean it to be. It can happen, and it does happen. Hey, someone has to win the lottery, right?

Sure, your odds of winning the music industry lotto are roughly akin to getting struck by lightning, but every year, people around the world get struck by lightning.

CT

My high school principal got struck by lightening...TWICE!!!!
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#14
Dave Grohl was in a band that had some huge records.... twice!!



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#15
Quote by axemanchris
Dave Grohl was in a band that had some huge records.... twice!!



CT


It makes me feel old to know some teens don't know Grohl's past. I saw a "looks like" photo that stated "drummer in nirvana looks like singer in foo fighters" lol
#16
^

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
Quote by Killsocket
It makes me feel old to know some teens don't know Grohl's past. I saw a "looks like" photo that stated "drummer in nirvana looks like singer in foo fighters" lol


Oh I saw something just as bad (on failbook, but just as bad);


On the comments for "The Hobbit" movie trailer, based on the book:

And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#18
Instead of relocating, try to establish yourself throughout Ohio. Then once your established in Ohio, try establishing yourself in neighboring states. Slowly working your way out towards the bigger music scenes.
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