#1
So, a friend of mine who knows 0 about guitars, got himself some second hand fender copy guitar. It's some chinese unknown brand, but it doesn't really matter, it produces sound (not really nice sound, but it is sound), and he's just learning.

Anyway, the guitar has some horrible fret buzz. I tried setting the action in just about any setting possible, and the neck is in the right angle, amazingly.

From what I can see, it's the nut. It's appears to be too low, as the strings get lower and lower on the nut side, often hitting the 1st to about 12th fret. Weird shit.

What can I do to fix this? Thanks!
Bobby: Luckily I'd gone upstairs to listen to her piss so I heard her shout for me to help
#2
Take it to a luthier and get a new nut cut and installed. You need special tools/know-how to do this yourself.
Quote by Jesus
Gaza Strip- home. At least it was before I fucked ereythang up...
#4
Quote by JimDawson
Take it to a luthier and get a new nut cut and installed. You need special tools/know-how to do this yourself.

It's not worth the 30€ he paid the thing second hand.

Quote by darkwolf291
Could also have too much relief in the neck.

How do you mean? Could you elaborate a bit please, English isn't my native tongue.
Bobby: Luckily I'd gone upstairs to listen to her piss so I heard her shout for me to help
#5
I think he means that your neck is too "bent" toward the strings and you'll need to to tighten the truss rod. Personally, I think it's either the opposite or your nut needs to be changed.

I have a guitar like this, and what I do now is just stuff pieces of cardboard between the strings and where the strings go in the nut to raise the strings a bit on that end. It's pretty half-assed, but what else can you do if you aren't going to replace the nut?
Quote by Jesus
Gaza Strip- home. At least it was before I fucked ereythang up...
#6
Like I said in the OP, the neck is rather good, I really thinks it's more of a "nut problem". I was thinking of putting some tissue between it like you did with cardboard, but I'd like a more permanent solution.

Can I maybe take the nut off, glue a small wooden 'raiser' on the neck and then the nut back on?

....so ghetto. =D
Bobby: Luckily I'd gone upstairs to listen to her piss so I heard her shout for me to help
#7
How much relief is in the neck? You can't tell if the neck is "rather good" unless you measure it.
#8
Quote by al112987
How much relief is in the neck? You can't tell if the neck is "rather good" unless you measure it.

I haven't taken measurements yet, I should, but from what I was able to see "at first sight" (mark the quotes ) it was pretty ok.

I'll try to take measurements when I'm at his house, I'll also try to adjust the truss rod in hope of a fix.

Thanks for the help guys, by the way.
Bobby: Luckily I'd gone upstairs to listen to her piss so I heard her shout for me to help
#9
There is one reason why a string buzzes, because it's hitting the fret. The string is supposed to get lower on the nut end of the neck, or rather, it's supposed to get higher as you move towards the bridge. The easiest way to tell if the nut is cut too low is to see if you have buzzing on open strings. The nut height has no bearing on fretted notes (obviously).

The four things to check when you have buzzing are frets, nut, relief and bridge. If you have buzzing all over the neck, I'm almost 100% sure it's a problem with the neck needing more relief. It's either too straight or it has some back bow. You have a dead straight neck with good action, but you better have a damn good fret job.

Adjust the truss rod based on the amount of relief that the guitar is recommended to have. ie. use feeler gauges, don't eye-ball it. Unless you think you can see differences in hundredths of an inch.
#10
Quote by al112987
There is one reason why a string buzzes, because it's hitting the fret. The string is supposed to get lower on the nut end of the neck, or rather, it's supposed to get higher as you move towards the bridge. The easiest way to tell if the nut is cut too low is to see if you have buzzing on open strings. The nut height has no bearing on fretted notes (obviously).

The four things to check when you have buzzing are frets, nut, relief and bridge. If you have buzzing all over the neck, I'm almost 100% sure it's a problem with the neck needing more relief. It's either too straight or it has some back bow. You have a dead straight neck with good action, but you better have a damn good fret job.

Adjust the truss rod based on the amount of relief that the guitar is recommended to have. ie. use feeler gauges, don't eye-ball it. Unless you think you can see differences in hundredths of an inch.

Thanks for this! It will help for sure. I'll report back if I get it fixed, ...or don't get it fixed.
Bobby: Luckily I'd gone upstairs to listen to her piss so I heard her shout for me to help
#12
Quote by farmosh203
If you have a floyd rose you can do this, or maybe find a solution similar.

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Nuts,_saddles/Floyd_Rose_tremolos_and_parts/Locking_Nut_Shims.html

Why would a 30€ chinese fender copy have a locking nut? Let alone a Floyd Rose.


But thanks for the suggestion.
Bobby: Luckily I'd gone upstairs to listen to her piss so I heard her shout for me to help