#1
I had no idea where to post this, so I figured I'd go for technique.

Having played guitar for a while, I thought that I could start teaching people. I want to make a full teaching plan that will include everything a teacher can possibly offer.

I want to "collaborate" this sort of guide/teaching plan because I might forget to include something, perhaps even publish this as a sort of a book, or an article. Doesn't matter to me, just a step-by-step formula to teaching/learning guitar, going not only mentioning the physical, but deep emotional and mental aspects of learning an instrument, theory and everything.

I'd wish to communicate via google talk or MSN, my timezone is GMT+2, there's a great deal to discuss, so it would be essentially important if you live around my timezone.


If you live around my timezone, have either google talk or MSN, and have a reasonable experience in guitar essential to teach others and wish to do something like this, PM me.
#2
I would say it can't be done; you need to cater both material and teaching style to the student in question if it's going to be any good.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I would say it can't be done; you need to cater both material and teaching style to the student in question if it's going to be any good.


What do you mean?
#4
Quote by Aralingh
What do you mean?


Would you teach someone who wants to learn brutal death metal and someone who wants to learn indie the same way? Does a jazz guitarist need to learn the same things as a Neoclassical shred player? Would you teach a child of 12 the same way you would a 40 year old student?

The answers to all of these questions are, of course, no. If you think the answer is yes I suspect you may need to adjust how you see things.

Yes it's a good idea for musicians to learn as much as possible and technique is a set of principles but the student will still decide what they will want to learn more than you ever could. You serve their needs and wants, you don't impose your will on them.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#5
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Would you teach someone who wants to learn brutal death metal and someone who wants to learn indie the same way? Does a jazz guitarist need to learn the same things as a Neoclassical shred player? Would you teach a child of 12 the same way you would a 40 year old student?

The answers to all of these questions are, of course, no. If you think the answer is yes I suspect you may need to adjust how you see things.

Yes it's a good idea for musicians to learn as much as possible and technique is a set of principles but the student will still decide what they will want to learn more than you ever could. You serve their needs and wants, you don't impose your will on them.


I feel some confusion here from you. I don't plan to teach genres, I plan to teach to play the guitar.
#6
Quote by Aralingh
I feel some confusion here from you. I don't plan to teach genres, I plan to teach to play the guitar.


You may not plan to teach genres, but your student will most likely have one particular type of sound in mind. Whether it be a 12 year old girl who wants to learn Taylor Swift country songs, a 40 year old man who just wants some blues/classic rock (zepp or clapton), or a high schooler who wants to learn metalcore.

They are all different and you could start them on different spots. Not saying you shouldn't teach them all, but students get bored easy. You need to give them something so they can go home and say "COOL!".

From my example above: Teach the girl some open chords (or mini versions, smaller triads), perhaps teach the 40 year old man the E major/minor and the blues scale in E on 1 part of the neck, and maybe teach the high schooler how to make power chords.

Those are just ideas but you see how it varies? They need a reason to play. Your an instructor as well as inspiration.

Remember what inspired you? For me it was playing an E power chord with an amp the first time.
#7
Quote by Aralingh
I feel some confusion here from you. I don't plan to teach genres, I plan to teach to play the guitar.

But lets say you have a student who doesn't enjoy what you are teaching them. For examples sake lets say the song you are teaching is classical. Lets say the student is 16-17 years old, definitely committed, but at the same time has a short attention span and other priorities. If he/she does not enjoy classical music they will not learn it and stop playing the song.
You can have a rough outline but you still need to cater to the students wants/needs/interests/abilities.
#8
Quote by Aralingh
I feel some confusion here from you. I don't plan to teach genres, I plan to teach to play the guitar.


I don't mean to ruffle any feathers here but you're teaching people with wants and needs. You don't teach what they want to learn and they take their custom elsewhere which is a sad story that ends when you don't eat.

Good luck with teaching the same thing to all people, I think you'll find it's not something you can do while earning a living.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#9
I agree with Zaphod. What you want to teach and what a student wants to learn may be two very different things. And some techniques won't be something that certain people will have any use for. Not everyone will want to learn theory, not everyone will need to learn sweeps, not everyone will want to learn this or that. A guide encompassing everything is a good idea, but for most people it's useless. Lessons have to be tailored to the individual wants and needs of the student.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#10
Well, that won't be a problem for me since I don't plan on making this my living, or anywhere near that.

I don't plan on "connecting" with the students, I've had already many experiences with students who claim to be committed, I'm not planning to drive them, I'll be just providing everything they don't know they need.
#11
If you don't plan on connecting with the students, you're better off just making a web page with a bunch of lessons. If you're going to be teaching your material in face-to-face lessons, you will be a terrible teacher, no offense.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#12
Quote by Junior#1
If you don't plan on connecting with the students, you're better off just making a web page with a bunch of lessons. If you're going to be teaching your material in face-to-face lessons, you will be a terrible teacher, no offense.


Yes, my captain.

We'll see how it goes.
#13
Oh another thought: you're also assuming that anyone who comes to you to learn is on your plan somewhere, any student who comes to you who already knows how to do anything will almost certainly not fit in to your carefully laid out ideas. Good luck with that too.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#14
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Oh another thought: you're also assuming that anyone who comes to you to learn is on your plan somewhere, any student who comes to you who already knows how to do anything will almost certainly not fit in to your carefully laid out ideas. Good luck with that too.


That's fine with me.
#15
I don't plan on "connecting" with the students, I've had already many experiences with students who claim to be committed, I'm not planning to drive them, I'll be just providing everything they don't know they need.


They won't pay you any attention.

You better title it "How to sweep tap like a beast in 5 days with NO PRACTICE!" if you want anyone to read it.

Best of luck, I don't believe a solid guide like you're envisioning can be written - if it can, I think Ralph Denyer's guitar handbook is pretty close. Worth a look at.
#16
Quote by Freepower
They won't pay you any attention.

You better title it "How to sweep tap like a beast in 5 days with NO PRACTICE!" if you want anyone to read it.

Best of luck, I don't believe a solid guide like you're envisioning can be written - if it can, I think Ralph Denyer's guitar handbook is pretty close. Worth a look at.


I'm having a hard time explaining my teaching methods without appearing to be a total asshole, but I assure you, it's not that bad, what I have envisioned.