#2
Knowing the scale won't help you learn a solo. Knowing good practice habits and having good technique is going to get you there, not scales.
#3
I understand that but i want to understand what i am playing. I know a solo is made up of notes from a scale. Knowing a scale can also help you improvise.

PLaying other people song is good if you can learn things from it. I do want to be able to write my own stuff someday. Even be able to tab songs i don't have the tab for.
#4
Knowing a scale doesn't do anything for improv. If anything, it limits you. Knowing how to apply the scale is what helps you improvise and create music on the fly. My improvisation relies less on scalar concepts and more on fitting a mood and evoking a reaction. Memorizing scales doesn't do that; phrasing and good note choice do. Knowing a scale without knowing how to use it will only get you stuck inside of a box.

That said, if you're looking to analyze the solo, I'll say this - solos tend to start or finish on the tonic because of the resolution that doing so creates. For example, a trope of bluesy soloing is to bend a whole step up from the minor seventh to the root note of the key. That's not always true, but it very common that the first or last note is the tonic.
#5
hey guys, im a newer guitarist, ive been playing a little under a year now and im just wondering what scales make memorable solos for punk rock music?
#6
Quote by ty.little36
hey guys, im a newer guitarist, ive been playing a little under a year now and im just wondering what scales make memorable solos for punk rock music?


Scales don't make good solo's...

The player makes good solo's.

That's like me saying every solo played in the c major scale is memorable..

If that was the case there would be A LOTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT of memorable solo's.

Also there's no point learning a scale if you don't even know anything about it. If you can't understand scales and apply them then you're just playing a bunch of pointless notes.
Last edited by vayne92 at Mar 21, 2012,
#7
Quote by vayne92
Scales don't make good solo's...

The player makes good solo's.

That's like me saying every solo played in the c major scale is memorable..

If that was the case there would be A LOTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT of memorable solo's.

Also there's no point learning a scale if you don't even know anything about it. If you can't understand scales and apply them then you're just playing a bunch of pointless notes.


Alright man thanks for the help, but can you give me any tips on soloing?
#8
Quote by ty.little36
Alright man thanks for the help, but can you give me any tips on soloing?


As i would say for most things, practise..

I know it's not the answer people like to hear, but in most cases it's the best thing you can do.. Practise..

You're not gonna be able to play incredible solo's after playing guitar for a year. Guitar is a lifelong journey and you're always gonna be better.
The best thing i can suggest other than practising though is learning your theory. Understanding how music works is very important if you want to create it.
#9
Quote by vayne92
Scales don't make good solo's...

The player makes good solo's.

That's like me saying every solo played in the c major scale is memorable..

If that was the case there would be A LOTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT of memorable solo's.

Also there's no point learning a scale if you don't even know anything about it. If you can't understand scales and apply them then you're just playing a bunch of pointless notes.


I disagree. You don't have to understand music theory completely to be a great player who makes memorable solos and stuff. A lot of players don't concentrate just on theory, instead, just learn music theory,but not so in depth. Instead, just "feel" the music and just arrange the notes in a way which works. If you play enough, you will know what to play and what sounds good just from personal experience, you dont need to know everything there is to scales, if you just know the notes, you can "work it out" over time and eventually be unique and creative with it.
#10
Quote by highdarren
I disagree. You don't have to understand music theory completely to be a great player who makes memorable solos and stuff. A lot of players don't concentrate just on theory, instead, just learn music theory,but not so in depth. Instead, just "feel" the music and just arrange the notes in a way which works. If you play enough, you will know what to play and what sounds good just from personal experience, you dont need to know everything there is to scales, if you just know the notes, you can "work it out" over time and eventually be unique and creative with it.


You disagree? You mean you agree?

I did infact say that the player makes good solo's and not scales.

That being said though, don't disregard scales because understanding them is very important.
#11
Oh then, yeah, i agree. I thought you was saying that you need to know how the music works as appose to just knowing in your head what to play, when and where.

But I do think theory is important, but its not everything..
#12
Quote by highdarren
Oh then, yeah, i agree. I thought you was saying that you need to know how the music works as appose to just knowing in your head what to play, when and where.

But I do think theory is important, but its not everything..


Very true indeed.
A lot of players who know little to no theory have written some amazing music.

That being said, the longer you play guitar you'll naturally start to understand which notes work together and which don't. You wont know why they work well together, but you know that they do regardless.

But i think theory is absolutely priceless to learn and will help phenomenally. It's definitely something you'll want to learn one day.