#1
Hi Im learning music theory for guitar out of a book, how to make a major chord a minor. This is done by lowering the major third, the lowest note in a three note chord, down one half step or note.
For example, A (0222000) becomes (012200). So far I understand.

But why does C (010230) not become Cm (000230)?
#2
First, you're writing your chord fingerings backwards (at least according to most conventions). So C would be 032010.

032000 is CMA7, because you're dropping a C note (first fret, b string) to B. E is the major third of C, so you would have to drop every E in that chord to an Eb to form a Cmi.
language
jazyk
kieli
язык
العربية


My Tumblr: Lots of artist recommendations, album reviews, and ideas about music (as well as some film and bike stuff).

Go Sharks! Go Wings! Go Flyers! Go Kings!
Last edited by kaptkegan at Mar 20, 2012,
#3
No.

The major chord is changed to a minor by lowering the major third a half step. You have that part correct. The part you have wrong is that you lower the lowest string on the guitar to accomplish this. Typically, the lowest note played in a chord is the root note. Hence, playing 320003 is a G, or G major. If we lower the lowest note and create 220003, we would probably call this a G/F#, or a slash chord. In jazz circles, we might also refer to it as a Gmaj7, without the G root. To make your A major an A minor, we must do this: x02210. That takes the C# to a C, which is the flatted 3rd, or minor third.
#4
The third isn't always the lowest note of the chord. In fact, it usually isn't. You need to look at the construction of chords to fully understand this, but basically a three-note chord is typically made up of a root note, third and fifth. In most cases, the lowest note will be the root, but the third and fifth (and octaves of the root, third and fifth) can appear in pretty much any order. A major chord has a major third interval (two whole tones above the root) and a minor chord has a minor interval (three semitones above the root). Hope this helps a little
My Soundcloud
Always up for some C4C, been compared to Frank Turner, The Cure's Robert Smith and Bruce Springsteen so check out my stuff if you like the sound of that
#5
A normal chord is composed of a root, the third, and the fifth. The major chord features a major third; the minor chord features a minor third. That major/minor third is the only difference between a major and minor basic chord.

The open A major chord is made up of A, E, and C#. C# is the major third of A, so when it is lowered by a half step to C natural, the chord is then composed A, E, and C, which is an A minor chord.

A major

E--0--
B--2--
G--2--
D--2--
A--0--
E-----

A minor

E--0--
B--1--
G--2--
D--2--
A--0--
E-----


The open C major chord is made up of C, E, and G. In order to play C minor, you have to lower the E natural (which is the major third) to an E flat (which is the minor third). If you lower the C natural to a B natural as you did in your original post, you'll be playing a Cmaj7 chord (which is comprised of a root, its third, its fifth, and its major seventh).
C major

E--0--
B--1--
G--0--
D--2--
A--3--
E-----

C minor

E--3--
B--1--
G--0--
D--1--
A--3--
E-----

C maj7

E--0--
B--0--
G--0--
D--2--
A--3--
E-----




[GELDIT]
Fixed the Cmaj7 chord up there. Thanks, Sickz. I totally missed that.
Last edited by Geldin at Mar 21, 2012,
#6
Quote by Geldin

C major

E--0--
B--1--
G--0--
D--2--
A--3--
E-----

C minor

E--3--
B--1--
G--0--
D--1--
A--3--
E-----

C maj7

E--0--
B--[B]0[/B]--
G--0--
D--2--
A--3--
E-----



Fixed.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#7
Quote by Hypercat
Hi Im learning music theory for guitar out of a book, how to make a major chord a minor. This is done by lowering the major third, the lowest note in a three note chord, down one half step or note.
For example, A (0222000) becomes (012200). So far I understand.

But why does C (010230) not become Cm (000230)?

The difference between a major chord and a minor chord is the 3rd. If we compare C to Cm we get the following.

A Major chord is derived by combining the 1st, 3rd and 5th of the major scale. In other words the C Major scale contain the following notes. C D E F G A B

C Major is created by using the 1st, 3rd and 5th. C E and G. Cm is derived by flattening the 3rd. C Eb G.