#1
Okay so I am going to try my best to ask this right...

My general question is how to play lead over chord changes.

So using the C major scale over C-F-G progression would I...

Question One
How do I emphasize a chord change?
For the C chord do I have to start and end on the 1 (C), 3 (E), 5 (G) of that scale
For the F chord do I have to start and end on the 4 (F), 6 (A), 1 (C) of that scale
For the G chord do I have to start and end on the 5 (G), 7 (B), 2 (D) of that scale

Question Two
How do I make a smooth transistion for a chord change?
#2
1) You don't have to do any of that stuff, but highlighting the notes of the chord you're playing over can sound good.
2) I'm not really sure what you mean
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#3
While highlighting chord tones is one option, here's the real way to highlight a chord change with your leads:

When the chords change, change something else.

Change your rhythm. Change your scale. Change the notes you're using in the scale. Chance your relative volume. Change your picking style. Change the tempo of your lead. Change your effects. Change your octave. Change your position on the neck. Change your melody. Change ... whatever else you can think to change.

Change says "something is happening here! Pay attention!"
#4
Quote by rf01251
Okay so I am going to try my best to ask this right...

My general question is how to play lead over chord changes.

So using the C major scale over C-F-G progression would I...

Question One
How do I emphasize a chord change?
For the C chord do I have to start and end on the 1 (C), 3 (E), 5 (G) of that scale
For the F chord do I have to start and end on the 4 (F), 6 (A), 1 (C) of that scale
For the G chord do I have to start and end on the 5 (G), 7 (B), 2 (D) of that scale

Question Two
How do I make a smooth transistion for a chord change?

Target the 3rd on the the first beat of the bar for each new chord. The 3rd is very defining, even more so than the root. Feel free to target the other chord tones as well, but the 3rd is very defining.

To make a smooth transition in your lines, think about voice leading, which is the movement of individual chord voices smoothly from one chord to the next.

Find the closest possible distance between chords. You're using triads, so it's a little more limiting than if you were using 7th chords.

If you can, try to connect the chord tones by the smallest distance, which is a semitone (one fret).
#5
Quote by rf01251
Okay so I am going to try my best to ask this right...

My general question is how to play lead over chord changes.

So using the C major scale over C-F-G progression would I...

Question One
How do I emphasize a chord change?
For the C chord do I have to start and end on the 1 (C), 3 (E), 5 (G) of that scale
For the F chord do I have to start and end on the 4 (F), 6 (A), 1 (C) of that scale
For the G chord do I have to start and end on the 5 (G), 7 (B), 2 (D) of that scale

Question Two
How do I make a smooth transistion for a chord change?


You emphasize a chord change by creating a line that leads to a triad note during the change, I prefer the R 3 or 7, unless I'm intentionally using a tension note for color.

No you don't HAVE to, but I recommend learning this way in a structured sense first before trying to figure out other ways. Once you can do it the basic way it lends ease to other approaches (7ths, color tones for tension and resolution).

Smooth transition is created by creating lines that are leading to the chord on the change. Listen to Alex Hutchings for a great example of anticipating and nailing the change.

Best,

Sean