#1
Hi, I have a feeling this is gonna be a little trippy so hang with me.

OK you know how sometimes two colours can kinda clash? Like wearing a wine-red hoodie over a bright red T-shirt or something. Well, to me at least, almost all the colors I could think of that clash are pretty close to eachother so then I was like: Hmm, well that's a little bit like music, if two notes close to eachother are played at the same time it's gonna clash. And I guess that really makes some sense, seeing as both notes and colors (or the light reflected from said coloured object) is just wavelengths. So, now for the really trippy part:

So if we take this one step further, could one determine what colors go well with eachother using basic music theory (and converting the notes to wavelengths to colours)? Kinda creating resolved color-"chords"? What about dissonant chords (think something like B9)? And finally if I were to make a movie showing different pictures using this technique, could I make a "colour-chord" progression? What about "color-key-centers"?

Discuss.


Also, notice how I change up the spelling of colo(u)r to confuse the spelling police
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#2
lolwut.jpeg
Oh f*ck it,
I'm gonna have a party.
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I watched life turn into a TV show.
It was totally weird.
#4
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#6
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This is Germany we're talking about.


Germany


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Thanks alot. When i read the first sentence, i dont know why, but i laughed in the middle of my first class at tech school. You sir have made me look like a fool for the first and last time
#8
(Invalid img)



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#10
Well, it would be different for everyone, so to answer your question you could most certainly create a "colour-chord" progression/tonal color map, but if someone else were to attempt it it'd likely come out completely differently. Someone with a greater knowledge of/appreciation for the world of different colors would create something vastly different from someone who's never even used MS Paint before.

Edit: ^See, I completely disagree with that color correspondence chart up there.
I think it's time for a change.



Sig v5.0 (approximate)
Last edited by §ArmyofAngels§ at Mar 21, 2012,
#11
Quote by whalepudding
Wouldn't complimentary colours become tritones


I have no idea. I know virtually nothing of colors.

Actually I'm a bit color blind...


Quote by Harvey Swick

Awesome stuff



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#13
i've been doing this for a while. if anyones interested, i have dyslexia. something that i always thought would prevent me from reading notation at any form of fluid level. so after years of trying to find a way of bypassing notation, i started making these:


just ignore the tablature for a second. Basically I've gone through and ive changed the colours to what i see when i hear a note, the spaces have been coloured to a lighter shade of that note to help separate the differences in the note levels. if you're dyslexic, you would know how difficult it is to keep a note still and focus on what it is. so within 2 months i was reading this fluently. btw i had also sectioned off parts of the fret board and coloured them in my head too.

i then tried to wean myself off this system by fading the colours closer to black (using that for a few months). and then i switched to regular notation. over all it took me about half a year to be able to sight read normal notation. im still not fantastic at it, point is i found a way to train out of dyslexia that worked with my disability, instead of against it.

i did this with someone i was teaching earlier this year (with their own selected colours) and they seem to have picked up notation in an incredibly short time. im really not sure if anyone else is using this method. i suppose it depends on how your brain learns.

i could go on if anyone wants to hear more
Last edited by Marshmelllow at Mar 21, 2012,
#14
Scientifically making the best music that's scientifically possible ?

Boybands done that, mainstream pop done that, modern electronic music done that.
#15
Quote by Marshmelllow


i could go on if anyone wants to hear more

Please do. I'm actually very interested.
I think it's time for a change.



Sig v5.0 (approximate)
#17
Quote by §ArmyofAngels§
Please do. I'm actually very interested.


although i can't speak from a professional standpoint, i can speak from the stand point of someone who has dealt with learning disabilities, being dyslexia. The main problem i find, is that almost everything taught is aimed at English based learners (or language based learners). Something almost all current education systems use (and have done for over a century), in basically everything. English, maths and certainly music.

This is something I've always struggled with as i have an inability (or more of a disability) to think, assess or solve language based problems. and i use the term 'problems' loosely. i mean any word structure is also a problem. so as you could imagine i never responded well to this standardised type of learning, and I've struggled to find ways around it. some people do respond, others have varying degrees of how they respond to each type; language based, image based, physical based etc..

it appears the idea has been done before (coloured based music) but not as a preferred method for teaching. what i have found is that this has taken notation out of something solely for language based learners (which notation is), and tailored it for people who are more image based. this completely bypassed any need for me to think using normal methods of reading (the very thing i have issues with). I should also mention, that with dyslexia comes auditory short-term memory, in some cases. so its also given an alternative to thinking directly in sound as a method for remembering songs.

since each note now has an individual value (aside from its position on the staff) once i had learned to read using colours fluently, the only thing left was to learn how to read the colours in a position (as in where the note is on a staff). keep in mind, using the notes position on the staff to tell me what to play was the problem.

This why i 'weaned' myself off it by degrading the colours closer to black. the colours are no longer the key aspect, the position was. and the degraded colours acted more as a hint. this trained me into recognising the note by its position on the staff. something i could never do before. So you see reading notation and the reading music have now been separated as individual tasks. things that can be focused on one at a time, using different types of learning.

Afterwards, reading normal notation became like reading colourless colours (or colourless notes). that changed over time with practice, i can now work off its position on the staff. but the whole coloured notes thing gave me a gate way for overcoming my learning problem. when it comes to notation, at least.

that person i taught for a bit seemed to pick up notation faster than anyone when i was 'learning' notation in school. once again it depends on how your brain responds to the different learning types. i can't really say it should be used as a replacement for people who learn this way. i'm not really a teacher, and its only helped two people as far as i know. point is i found a way that worked incredibly quickly for the way my brain works. you may find it has a similar affect for you, or it might not.

problem is, actually making the notation takes way too much time. time that could be spent doing other stuff. idk, its something to think about atleast
Last edited by Marshmelllow at Mar 21, 2012,
#18
soundwaves=lightwaves?
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#19
Quote by AmalgamOfMeat
(Invalid img)I'm sure there's programs that map out music (probably midi) in this fashion.
map out music (probably midi) in this fashion.
#20
Quote by Harvey Swick
soundwaves=lightwaves?


no, its just another way to represent a sound. just like how we currently use letters and names.
#21
Quote by kloppwkf
map out music (probably midi) in this fashion.

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Edit: Shit. forgot about the "batman" linking thing. >.>
You dirty piece of shit, you.

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#22
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Look up something called 'sound → color synesthesia'



I was kind of thinking this, but I realized it's not really the same thing. Interesting, though.
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