#1
What are some good tips and guidlines when creating basslines? For instance, Do you always have to keep the root of the chord prominent so the listener knows what chord is being played.

Please keep in mind that I mainly am a rock / blues/ pop kind of style of music. So answer the question with that in mind.
#2
I'm not a bassist, but I frequently experiment with walking bass for solo jazz guitar. So my explanation would be more jazz orientated, so I won't answer your question, but rather...

http://www.wikihow.com/Compose-a-Good-Bassline

I think one of the main issues to address here is groove however. Especially since this is rock and pop.
Last edited by mdc at Mar 21, 2012,
#3
I just use the appropriate scale/s for the key and emphasise chord tones, just like writing a solo for guitar.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
I'm not a bass player. I've experimented with basslines and came up with a problem.

I think it's genre specific. In metal, if basslines are too interesting they take away attention away from the guitar riffs. If I write a guitar riff I don't really want the bassline widdling up and down chord tones. It can create an interesting sound but it dilutes the guitar part.

I find it very difficult to write an interesting bassline that doesn't do this. Geezer Butler and others managed to do it. I think bass playing is a different calling from guitar playing in some ways.

That's not to say bassline should ALWAYS just follow the guitar. If an interesting bassline is written before the guitar riff then the guitar should complement, not dilute, it.
#7
Quote by AlanHB
I just use the appropriate scale/s for the key and emphasise chord tones, just like writing a solo for guitar.


This

Quote by Sean0913
Simplicity. Think as an extension of a drummer. Use chord tones, (lots of roots) In my opinion, a good bass line is one that you dont neccesarily always notice because its in the pocket, but if it were missing from the piece you'd know it.

Best,

Sean


And this.

Also, learn how to use approach notes between chord tones, especially from one root of a chord to the next, and the use of inversions can always lead to some nice, melodic bass lines.

Analyze some bass lines from songs/artists you like. That will help a ton!
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#8
Quote by Jehannum
If an interesting bassline is written before the guitar riff then the guitar should complement, not dilute, it.

Yeah, the gutar riff on Sunshine of Your Love was actually J B's line, not Eric's.
#9
Roots are important. Passing tones are cool.
Depends on the type of music really. Jazz is different from funk is different from reggae is different from RnB is different from punk.
I approach each genre differently when coming up with bass lines.
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#10
I personally use chord tones mainly with chromatic passing tones between the chords. In my more frantic moments I resort to modal walking but that's more to get a sense of urgency and insanity going rather than to create a melodic bassline.
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absolutely what will said

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