#1
Ok ive been really thinking about it lately and i want to learn cello. I'm currently a freshmen In music comp and most of the classical music im growing to like is from the baroque period. Stuff like Vivaldi. More specifically string quartets/cellos/violins. Violins are just a little to "squealer" for me. I play piano right now (22 years) so i know how to read treb and bass cleff (cello is in bass i think). AND i know how to practice. so on to my questions

Do i take lessons through the college im at or through someone locally. Coming in as someone with no experience on the cello where is going to be the best place to learn from?

How long will your hands hurt in the begining. I tried out guitar a while back so i know I will have to grow calluses and stuff but what about the muscles and all. I'm cool if its only going to be like a month or to that my hands/arms/stuff hurt but if im going to be hurting like 6 months down the road then I may have to reconsider.

Do cellos always have the "buzzing" sound like on some videos on youtube. Is that something that your technique gets ride off.

For a while i bouned between wanting cello and violin, what are the big main diffrences and how hard would it be to learn the violin down the line if i had learned cello

Finally........................How long does it take to get basic technique down AND START HAVING FUN :p
#3
With a larger class seems better because you can see what works for other people instead of what one teacher says (although there is proper way, it may not always be the best way), plus you may get motivated from trying to be better than other people. On the other hand, a college orchestra is most likely made up of people who can already play.

You hands shouldn't hurt too long. I don't remember my hands ever hurting going to double bass or cello (from guitar though, which also never hurt, but before that I did hard work which did). So not long. Maybe a month or two, but not long.

Cellos shouldn't buzz if you press hard enough and the fingerboard is level.

Violin has different scale length, strings, cleff, etc... You'll pick it up easier than something completely different, but it's still not going to be the same.

For basic technique and fun, that depends how fast you advance. Maybe 3 months, maybe 6, maybe a year. All depends on how well you pick it up.
#4
Quote by Adelines
Ok ive been really thinking about it lately and i want to learn cello. I'm currently a freshmen In music comp and most of the classical music im growing to like is from the baroque period. Stuff like Vivaldi. More specifically string quartets/cellos/violins. Violins are just a little to "squealer" for me. I play piano right now (22 years) so i know how to read treb and bass cleff (cello is in bass i think). AND i know how to practice. so on to my questions

Cello is interesting in that you'll encounter (in descending order of frequency) bass clef, treble clef, and alto clef. Most of what you'll play at the beginner level is going to be in bass clef (it all ought to be, but I'm always hesitant to use absolutes).
Do i take lessons through the college im at or through someone locally. Coming in as someone with no experience on the cello where is going to be the best place to learn from?

Personally, I would try to take from a college or university professor in that instrument, but I've encountered some excellent instructors who are independent of academia. When looking for a teacher, it's more important that you feel comfortable with them and that they can communicate ideas to you easily. A good teacher isn't necessarily the best or smartest, but he is necessarily going to be the one who is best at communicating and instructing.

How long will your hands hurt in the begining. I tried out guitar a while back so i know I will have to grow calluses and stuff but what about the muscles and all. I'm cool if its only going to be like a month or to that my hands/arms/stuff hurt but if im going to be hurting like 6 months down the road then I may have to reconsider.

Your hands shouldn't hurt at all. Proper technique is rather comfortable and, if applied properly, will actually improve your posture. You actually shouldn't have to worry about calluses; the string height on a cello is much lower than you might expect. The real difficulty is in finger positioning, since you don't have frets.
Do cellos always have the "buzzing" sound like on some videos on youtube. Is that something that your technique gets ride off.

I'm not sure what buzzing sound you're referring to. It might be a wolf tone or an unintentional harmonic if it's a fingering issue; it might also be bad bowing technique. Either way, good technique and proper care of your instrument will prevent undesired noises (as is the case with guitar and every other instrument out there).

For a while i bouned between wanting cello and violin, what are the big main diffrences and how hard would it be to learn the violin down the line if i had learned cello

Finally........................How long does it take to get basic technique down AND START HAVING FUN :p

The biggest differences are (1) string tuning, (2) finger position [this one's probably the most challenging when going from cello to violin], and (3) body posture. As far as technique is concerned, there's a lot of overlap between the two instruments. Your basic technique is essentially the exact same.

As for how long it'll take is entirely up to how well you practice, how often you practice, and how good your instructor is. When I started playing violin, it took me months to learn proper bowing technique and acquire the necessary muscle memory to finger notes properly, but I had poor instruction at the basic level. For someone who practices regularly and has good instruction, you could have a strong handle on basic technique inside of a few months.