#1
I'm trying to learn more jazz, so I'm looking for some simple jazz standards to learn. Also looking for some good jazz guitarists to listen to, so I can get more into jazz.
Last edited by tomc2 at Mar 21, 2012,
#2
Django Reinhardt all the wa-a-a-ay, but that's gypsy-jazz, maybe try it, fun to play
#3
Quote by AmirT
Django Reinhardt all the wa-a-a-ay, but that's gypsy-jazz, maybe try it, fun to play


I'll check him out. I was thinking more along the lines of like the Real Book stuff. I'm mainly looking for standards and stuff like that.
#5
Jazz has what are called standards, which are songs that most jazz musicians tend to be familiar with and have recorded and/or performed at some point in their career.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_jazz_standards

Definitely check out Django if you like swing. He brought gypsy jazz to the public consciousness with a stunning level of virtuosity and musicianship.
#6
Django, Wes Montgomery, Grant Green, Charlie Christian and Freddie Green are all worth checking out.


Dont just limit yourself to listening to guitarists though, check out and learn from trumpet, sax and piano players (and whatever else you can find).
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#7
Good ones to listen to are Charlie Christian, Wes Montgomery, and George Benson.


If your still pretty new then I suggest you start out with a couple easy Bossa Novas. The following link is to a very well laid out lesson for The Girl From Ipanema. The lesson is in Portugese but has tabs and chord charts and is self explanatory.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrqNCyXYuT0


This one is for Gershwins You Can't Take That Away From Me. It is a little harder but the nice thing about jazz is that you can make it as simple or as complicated as you want to, so don't feel that you have to put in all the fills and chord voicing substitutes until your ready.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVomUbMr6TM


This last one looks alot harder than it actually is, that is once you get used to playing octaves. Emily Remler throws some famous Wes Montgomery licks into this great and fun to play piece.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4j0qLksgXDE&feature=related
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
Last edited by BlackbirdPie at Mar 21, 2012,
#8
For general listening I reccommend Ella Fitzgerald for vocal stuff - I think its important to be aware of the lyrics of the standards you are playing so dont avoid singers. Also, google Betty Roché's version of Take The A Train, its ****ing awesome. I like Michael Buble's versions of standards also.

Also I reccommend listening to the greats of swing like the Count Basie and Duke of Ellington (a lot of Ella's stuff was recorded with him), as well as bebop guys like Charlie Parker and Miles Davis.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#9
The best way to learn jazz is to listen to (and transcribe) everybody, not just people who play your instrument. For example, I play trumpet and guitar, yet I find Wayne Shorter's compositions and sax playing to be extremely good to listen to for new ideas.
#10
Quote by timeconsumer09
The best way to learn jazz is to listen to (and transcribe) everybody, not just people who play your instrument. For example, I play trumpet and guitar, yet I find Wayne Shorter's compositions and sax playing to be extremely good to listen to for new ideas.


Second this, I'm very partial to Joshua Redman personally.
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#12
Quote by Hydra150
For general listening I reccommend Ella Fitzgerald for vocal stuff - I think its important to be aware of the lyrics of the standards you are playing so dont avoid singers. Also, google Betty Roché's version of Take The A Train, its ****ing awesome. I like Michael Buble's versions of standards also.

Also I reccommend listening to the greats of swing like the Count Basie and Duke of Ellington (a lot of Ella's stuff was recorded with him), as well as bebop guys like Charlie Parker and Miles Davis.


all solid advice.
#DTWD
#13
http://acmuzik.com/wp-content/uploads/guitar-book.pdf

Happened upon this on a youtube video, reminded me of this thread - scroll down to the selected discography.

Comes from this YT account http://www.youtube.com/user/ACMuzik08 which has some interesting stuff worth checking out.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#14
An idea my friend gave me is transcribing rhythmic figures used by tapdancers and utilizing those in soloing. surprisingly awesome advice
#15
If you want some Jazz guitar to listen to check out Pat Metheny. Not so much the Pat Metheny Group (though I love The Way Up), more the Pat Metheny Trio and Pat Metheny in collaboration with other musicians.

I HIGHLY RECOMMEND Question and Answer and Bright Size Life. Sick records both musically and the playing level of all musicians involved.

Also, I read somewhere many years ago about how the average sax player is better than the average guitarist and how guitarist can learn from sax players. Check guys like John Coltrane, Wayne Shorter, Charlie Parker, Michael Brecker, et al. Just do a search. You'll see the same guys names pop up over and over.
#16
You cant go wrong with the greats like miles davis, charles mingus, john coltrane, billie holiday, ella fitzgerald, and most imporrtantly - louis armstrong