#1
I got my Squier Classic Vibe 60 and I love the sound, just love it. I have my amp (Mustang 1) on some custom blues setting that I just love (too lazy to look, not my main point). The Squier is my second guitar because I was unhappy with the sound of my Epiphone G400 '66. It sounds great, but not that Strat Blues I am falling in love with.

FYI: I am doing justinguitar.com and doing his modules AND I love to play around a bit with the 12 bar blues. What Justin has going on in the Beginner Course is chord changes within a minute. Based on these results I am finding the following:

I can change chords more times in one minute on the G400 than the Squier Vibe 60.
I can play the 12 bar blues much better on the G400 than the Squier Vibe 60.
I like the sound of the Vibe 60 better for Blues.

I guess the question is for you multi-guitar folks out there, is this something common or is this some weird phenomenon?
#2
It's normal, the scale length on the Strat (I assume it's a strat?) is much longer than that of the SG and therefore has more tension on the strings and is a bit harder to play. Neck shapes, profiles and lengths all play a huge role in this. My PRS is much easier to play than my strat but I love that strat sound.
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#3
Yeah, this is the Squier Classic Vibe 60 Stratocaster. It's pretty awesome for the price.

I am glad to hear this is somewhat normal. I was freaking out.
#4
Quote by Killsocket
Yeah, this is the Squier Classic Vibe 60 Stratocaster. It's pretty awesome for the price.

I am glad to hear this is somewhat normal. I was freaking out.


Yeah, they're not bad. I played one right next to my American and thought it was solid.
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Taylor 712
#5
in general guitar is an instrument that doesn't have too many rules. 99% of what you see or anybody will tell you is an opinion. they do what sounds good to them, feels good for them, etc. i happen to love Les Pauls for blues, over strats and over teles. most people would disagree with me though and that is their right.

there is a reason why you can play X guitar better than Y guitar, and often like you guitars, pickup configurations, bridges, hardware in general, scale lengths, it goes on and on. just don't limit yourself. i have quite a few and can play them all well. i have everything from LP's to wolfgangs to ibanez RG Prestiges and a strat. they all have their niche. i do most of my playing on three of them though.

do what is right for you.
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#6
Body shape has always been the problem for me. I can get down with Explorers and Vs, but I can't play worth a damn on a Strat or SG because they're bigger and the distance from the edge of the body to the bridge is greater.
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#7
its normal. different guitars sound different and play differently. thats why there's more than one design (if everybody liked the same thing, we'd only have 1 type). I know that I can't play on strats. no idea why, just the combination of sound and ergonomics conspires against me (but I like super-strats).

the more your playing develops, the better a sense you'll have about what you like, don't like and love.
#8
Its common, I can play a 24.75" scale better than I can a 25.5 but I have more trouble with guitars that have anything bigger than a 42mm nut than I do with guitars that do have one.
#9
I have no idea if they're different on these, too lazy to check, but if the fretboard radii are too different it could definitely have a noticeable difference on chord-y stuff. Also action could play a huge roll, along with scale length.

I have an EBMM JP6 yet I still find it easiest to play stuff with lots of big chords on a strat knockoff I bought for 50 dollars, no matter how I set up my JP6. ._.
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#11
Quote by Pac_man0123
I used to notice a huge difference in going between guitars. After a while, I got more experienced and now playing different types of guitars doesn't really bother me. Then again, 4 of them are Ibanez.

Which one do you play the most, the super thin neck, the super thin neck, the super thin neck, or the ever so popular super thin necked ibanez?

lol

I like the wizard II neck thickness but the boards are too wide for me to play comfortably.
#12
Quote by Killsocket
I got my Squier Classic Vibe 60 and I love the sound, just love it. I have my amp (Mustang 1) on some custom blues setting that I just love (too lazy to look, not my main point). The Squier is my second guitar because I was unhappy with the sound of my Epiphone G400 '66. It sounds great, but not that Strat Blues I am falling in love with.

FYI: I am doing justinguitar.com and doing his modules AND I love to play around a bit with the 12 bar blues. What Justin has going on in the Beginner Course is chord changes within a minute. Based on these results I am finding the following:

I can change chords more times in one minute on the G400 than the Squier Vibe 60.
I can play the 12 bar blues much better on the G400 than the Squier Vibe 60.
I like the sound of the Vibe 60 better for Blues.

I guess the question is for you multi-guitar folks out there, is this something common or is this some weird phenomenon?
I have a couple acoustics, a Fender American Strat and a Gibson Les Studio. I found your post very interesting... I aware I play all 3 guitars differently but I never thought to do metrics on which Im faster on.

Of all 3 I like the acoustic the least, but I can play it in the kids rooms or outside or wherever and it allows me to grab 20 minutes of playing time here and there I wouldnt get normallly.

I would have to say I love the Strat/LP equally, but they are so different. I tend to play one or the other for a couple weeks at time then switch and every time I switch I fall back in love with the sound of that guitar.

I agree... nothing gets that sweet bell tone like a strat. But I love the freight train growl I get from Les. They are sooo different. I string the Les with slinky10s and the strat with slinky 11s. Also as mentioned above the frets on the LP are closer together then on the strat so the guitars have a very different feel. I also feel the LP requires more precision because I play it dirty, if you dont hit the notes it gets to muddy
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#13
i'm just gonna throw in strap length here.

if you stand when you play obviously.

just one thought.
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#14
Are you asking whether it's common for different guitars to feel and sound...different?

Well, yeah, it is.
#15
since no one has mentioned the obvious those guitars have totally different bridges. strats have a flat bridge surface as opposed to the raised one on your SG. this means different picking hand positions which can cause some issues with comfort. different styles of necks can as well. i play mainly strats but have aSquier Esprit ( very similar to the Robben Ford model that Fender used to make) this has the same bridge setup as a LP and is totally different than my strats. takes a few minutes to adjust sometimes. the longer you play and the more different guitars you play on will help you (to a degree) get used to different setups and you'll be able to go from one to another with greater ease.
#16
Perfectly normal. I've got several guitars, but my strat is my 'go to' guitar if I need to learn something new simply because I'm used to it.

I was doing some 17-20th fret stuff last night on a LP copy, and wondered why it didn't feel quite right, looked down and went "Oh yeah, scale length...". Wasn't that it couldn't be done, just that I had to adjust from my (more) comfort zone a bit.
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#17
Personally, I found it easier to play my SG's as opposed to my CV strat. However, as I've gotten more used to the strat (had it since September), I haven't noticed the different playability as much. I pretty much play them all equally and just pick up whatever guitar I feel like playing at the moment. I don't have a #1; they are all #1 to me sans the accoustic.
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#18
Totally normal and perfunctory. I can play my strat much much better than i can my schecter, but i like the schecter more for the style i play most often. You'll learn to find things you like about each instrument you play and then you start looking for one guitar that has all of those things
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#19
It's totally normal. And it all comes down to the way the guitar is setup, the scale length, how wide the neck is, and how comfortable the guitar is to you.

Why? Because all these things directly affect how the guitar feels and plays, and to some degree the sound. But if a guitar feels and plays better to YOU, then it will feel eeasier than another guitar. The sound of the squire being better is on another side of things, but the feel, that affects everything.
#20
I completely agree with the above with the width of the neck being an important factor. That was the biggest thing I noticed just recently when I got my CV 60's Stratocaster. I was missing strings by like a fraction and then I realised that the strings are a lot closer together then on my other guitars so it feels like I am learning the songs I already know how to play again. Also the strings due to the scale length do feel a lot stiffer which was something else that I am having to adjust to but once used to it, it will make me a more versatile player being comfortable to pick up different instruments.
#21
Quote by BigBigWater
I have no idea if they're different on these, too lazy to check, but if the fretboard radii are too different it could definitely have a noticeable difference on chord-y stuff. Also action could play a huge roll, along with scale length.

I have an EBMM JP6 yet I still find it easiest to play stuff with lots of big chords on a strat knockoff I bought for 50 dollars, no matter how I set up my JP6. ._.


That doesn't sound too surprising actually. The JPs have like a 15 inch radius. Your Strat copy is probably like 9 or 10.
#22
Quote by ibanart300
I completely agree with the above with the width of the neck being an important factor. That was the biggest thing I noticed just recently when I got my CV 60's Stratocaster. I was missing strings by like a fraction and then I realised that the strings are a lot closer together then on my other guitars so it feels like I am learning the songs I already know how to play again. Also the strings due to the scale length do feel a lot stiffer which was something else that I am having to adjust to but once used to it, it will make me a more versatile player being comfortable to pick up different instruments.


Am I nuts or is the CV 60 a 3/4 guitar? Next to my G400, it seems small. I do notice the strings are closer together.
#23
Quote by Killsocket
Am I nuts or is the CV 60 a 3/4 guitar? Next to my G400, it seems small. I do notice the strings are closer together.



You're nuts.
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#24
The nut is a little narrower on the CV 60's, iirc - 42mm on the CV vs 43 on the G400 - but it's a full size guitar. The string spacing is a little narrower because of that.
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#25
It's perfectly normal,man.I've got gibsons hanging on the wall that are worth more than my car and I'm sitting here playing a Schecter.Tomorrow it might be an es-330.They all havee their own personality.I've been playing more than 50 years and I can't play a PRS for sht.
#26
Quote by oneblackened
The nut is a little narrower on the CV 60's, iirc - 42mm on the CV vs 43 on the G400 - but it's a full size guitar. The string spacing is a little narrower because of that.


Yeah I figured it was because of that. But that slight difference meant me missing strings by like a fraction lol. I now practice on the CV60's strat just so I am more familiar with it when it comes to playing whole songs.
#27
I find it goes away quickly enough. I switch between a 48mm 7 string and a 43mm 6 string, and it's not actually that awkward. Going from an 8 to a 6 is a bigger change and is a bit weirder.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#28
If you are changing between chords with a note in common that is played by the same finger in both chords, you can often leave your finger on the shared notes and move your fingers to the notes that are different. C major to A minor is one example of this. These chords have two notes in common that are played with the same finger in both chords:
1. second fret of the fourth string - played by the middle finger
2. first fret of the second string - played by the index finger
The only difference between the chords is which note the ring finger plays: the third fret of the fifth string in the C major chord and the second fret on the third string in A minor. You can change between these chords by moving only the ring finger and leaving your index and middle fingers in the same place. This is much easier than lifting all your fingers.
#29
After some playing around with them, I think it is the neck tilt on the SG that makes it easier... But I am starting to get used to the CV 60 now. Both are becoming the same to me now in comfort, just different.
#30
Quote by Killsocket
After some playing around with them, I think it is the neck tilt on the SG that makes it easier... But I am starting to get used to the CV 60 now. Both are becoming the same to me now in comfort, just different.

Oh yeah, the neck angle is a big thing too. I find it really weird to play guitars that don't have tune-o-matics because of the neck angle.
Current Gear:
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Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.