#1
Hey first off my apologies if there is actually a better place to be posting this, but nowhere seemed anymore ideal than the pit.

I was just wondering what sort of tips/tricks anyone has of getting vocals to stick out in a live mix? My band and I are having some serious trouble getting this to work.

I don't know any of the specs of our setup right now but we've basically just got bass and vocals running through our PA [with a guitarist just using his amp, and no need to mic drums]. We've got decent mics but just can get the vocals to cut through for whatever reason.
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#3
play quieter
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#4
Record them separately then mix later with higher volume for vocals and lower volume for instrumentals.

Can't be simpler, really.
#5
Quote by lushacrous
play quieter

This. If your PA system doesn't the output to match the volume the drums and guitar are at, have your guitarist turn down the volume, and have the drummer play quieter.
#6
Typical guitarist. Tell him to turn it the fuck down.
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#8
Put another mic next to the one he sings into and have it go right into the interface or multitracker. Can tinker with the levels later and it'll let you mess with getting a bigger sound out of his voice by adding reverb, panning, etc, if you so desire.
#9
If the PA isn't loud enough, try micing it up. There are two options for accomplishing this, a louder one and a cheaper one. The first solution is to mic up your PA and run it into another PA. This way, you will get twice the volume.

The cheaper solution, if you don't want to get another PA system, is to mic up your PA and run the mic back into it, this way the sound will come out and go back into the mic, and come out again. This solution is not as good as the first, because you only have one PA, and it won't be as loud, since two is louder than one, but again, it is cheaper.

Another thing to consider is to combine these two ideas, by using the second to PA to mic up the first, and then mic up the second and run it back to the first. This way you get both PAs twice, and so it will be about 3 times louder than one PA.

I hope that helps.

>_>

<_<


Don't really do that though...
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#10
Quote by sandyman323
EQ it right, turn it up, turn other instruments down.

This would be the right answer, but they're not all going through the PA.

Two questions; 1) why is your bass player going through the PA, 2) are you doing a proper sound check?

Its my opinion with a PA its all or nothing, either have every instrument going through it, and have it all properly EQ'd or none (just vocals). The bass may be interfering with hearing the vocals since its coming out of the same speakers. Does your bass player not have a good enough amp to play out of, or do you just want the sound to carry more? If its the latter, have him pay out the amp, if its the former, tell him to buy one!

As for sound check you guys so be ensuring this doesn't happen before you start, not wondering why it happened afterwards. Play one chord on each instrument and balance them to your preference with the vocals being able to heard well over top. Have your singer test the mic, and also have him scream into to make sure belting wont caus feedback. You should preferably do this before the show where there are as little people in the venue as possible. If thats not a possiblity because you're going on as a second or closing band, then do it at your jam space, remember your volumes and do a 2-3 minute check on stage just to ensure it works there as well.

Since drums don't have a volume knob youll have to balance the instruments to the volume of his typical playing. If at that volume level the vocals don't cut through, then the drummer either needs to change his style (this may be for the better if you're at smaller venues) or you're PA simply isn't powerful enough. How many watts is it?

Also, don't have your members do their individual levels. You can't hear properly on stage what you sound like in the audience, so have another member or friend of the band (that has some knowledge of music as well) go into the area where people will be watching and tell you if you should turn up or down. Trust their judgement, and don't let anyone be a selfish prick and think they need to be turned up, or a shy ****** who thinks they need to be turned down. Everyone has to be on the same page for your sound. And vocals should always be first priority to hear. Even if that isnt the opinion of the people in the band, it will be the opinion of the people in the audience. Think of how many people would be interested in seeing a local instrumental rock band. Not very many, I doubt you would either unless they were virtuosos or some shit. So figure it out and don't play until you do!
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#11
Quote by dameqgus
sing louder

No

Quote by CrossBack7
Put another mic next to the one he sings into and have it go right into the interface or multitracker. Can tinker with the levels later and it'll let you mess with getting a bigger sound out of his voice by adding reverb, panning, etc, if you so desire.

No

Quote by theogonia777
If the PA isn't loud enough, try micing it up. There are two options for accomplishing this, a louder one and a cheaper one. The first solution is to mic up your PA and run it into another PA. This way, you will get twice the volume.

The cheaper solution, if you don't want to get another PA system, is to mic up your PA and run the mic back into it, this way the sound will come out and go back into the mic, and come out again. This solution is not as good as the first, because you only have one PA, and it won't be as loud, since two is louder than one, but again, it is cheaper.

Another thing to consider is to combine these two ideas, by using the second to PA to mic up the first, and then mic up the second and run it back to the first. This way you get both PAs twice, and so it will be about 3 times louder than one PA.

I hope that helps.

>_>

<_<


Don't really do that though...

No

Don't do any of these things, they are instant recipes for feedback, and your singer shouldn't have to force himself to sing louder to be heard when he's being put through a PA. If anything he should be worried about being to loud when he belts and have to back up away from the mic.

Unless he has some problem with singing quiet, where you wouldn't be able to hear him if you were just jamming with acoustic guitars, then no, don't advise to sing louder. He'll just strain his voice doing that all night long, every gig.
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wtf is a selfie? is that like, touching yourself or something?
Last edited by Wiegenlied at Mar 22, 2012,
#12
Quote by Wiegenlied
No





Why? If he's playing at a place that's so small that he can't pump it all through a PA, it's his best choice. If his ONLY problem is that the vocalist isn't heard on live recordings, this would solve it even if doesn't want to shell out the money for a more powerful PA, as it's clearly a little bitch unit.

EQing has nothing to do with this.
#13
Quote by CrossBack7
Why? If he's playing at a place that's so small that he can't pump it all through a PA, it's his best choice. If his ONLY problem is that the vocalist isn't heard on live recordings, this would solve it even if doesn't want to shell out the money for a more powerful PA, as it's clearly a little bitch unit.

EQing has nothing to do with this.


Pretty sure that he means live mix as opposed to recording.

Try it without running the bass through the P.A (bass needs a pretty strong P.A to be pumped out loud even without adding other channels to that mix). I reckon for what you have described just running vocals through the P.A and EQing them correctly (try and avoid masking) will help them sit above the mix.
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#14
Quote by theogonia777
If the PA isn't loud enough, try micing it up. There are two options for accomplishing this, a louder one and a cheaper one. The first solution is to mic up your PA and run it into another PA. This way, you will get twice the volume.

The cheaper solution, if you don't want to get another PA system, is to mic up your PA and run the mic back into it, this way the sound will come out and go back into the mic, and come out again. This solution is not as good as the first, because you only have one PA, and it won't be as loud, since two is louder than one, but again, it is cheaper.

Another thing to consider is to combine these two ideas, by using the second to PA to mic up the first, and then mic up the second and run it back to the first. This way you get both PAs twice, and so it will be about 3 times louder than one PA.

I hope that helps.

>_>

<_<


Don't really do that though...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eal4fep7pK4&feature=youtu.be&t=24s