#1
Just a question regarding triplets, why is it that when there are 3 notes for each beat they're called 8th note triplets, Shouldn't they be called quarter note triplets because there's three to each quarter note. Also, are 16th note triplets the same as sextuplets? because although they are the same number of notes per beat they have a different feel
Last edited by Guitarcrazydude at Mar 22, 2012,
#2
They're 8th note triplets because it's 3 eighth notes in a beat. Just like a quarter note triplet would be 3 quarter notes every two beats. It's 3 in the space of 2.
And if I'm right, sextuplets are just 2 triplets connected end on end. Nothing special there.

16th note triplets are 3 16th notes in the space of 1 eighth note, or 3 16th notes in the space of 2 16th notes. However you want to look at it.
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#3
They are called that because there are three in the time of two eighth notes. They are closer in time value to an eighth note than a quarter note, so it makes more sense to name them this way.
Yeah 16th note triplets are the same as sextuplets AFAIK.
#4
What a triplet means is you play three notes in the space that would normally contain two. So that's why they're 8th triplets and not quarter triplets. Which makes sense, because they are a lot closer to 8th notes then they are to quarter notes.

And 16th triplets are again three notes played in the space of two 16th notes, whereas a 16 sextuplet is 6 notes played in the space of 4 16th's. So yes, to a computer putting two triplets after each other is the same as a sextuplet. But as you rightly say, a musician will generally play them both with different dynamics.
#6
I'm not really sure why it works that way but I guess it saves having to worry about third/sixth/twelfth notes.

I suppose you could think of it this way:
16th note triplets = 24th notes
8th note triplets = 12th notes
quarter note triplets = 6th notes

Bracketed notes do a lot more than triplets too, as you can probably imagine. They just work off of a ratio, triplets being 3:2 meaning three "whatever" notes played in the same time as two of the same kind of note you're making triplets from.
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#7
Quote by Guitarcrazydude
Just a question regarding triplets, why is it that when there are 3 notes for each beat they're called 8th note triplets, Shouldn't they be called quarter note triplets because there's three to each quarter note. Also, are 16th note triplets the same as sextuplets? because although they are the same number of notes per beat they have a different feel

Triplet quite simply means three in the space of two.

So a quarter note triplet is 3 quarter notes in the space of 2 quarter notes. Easier to say than play, however;

Sing                             1 + a  2 + a
Foot taps the quarter note pulse *      *
Clap the quarter note triplet    *   *    *
Last edited by mdc at Mar 22, 2012,
#8
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Alright I kind of get it now, thanks for that.(Invalid img)
I kind of get it now, thanks for that
#9
Quote by mdc
Triplet quite simply means three in the space of two.

So a quarter note triplet is 3 quarter notes in the space of 2 quarter notes. Easier to say than play, however;

Sing                             1 + a  2 + a
Foot taps the quarter note pulse * *
Clap the quarter note triplet * * *



Why just say this while you play:
1. For normal: 1, 2. Play a note on 1, and another note on 2.
2. For a triplet: 1, &, 2. Play a note on 1, another on &, and another on 2.

Right? Just get your metronome set and it shouldn't be too hard....
#10
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#11
Quote by Exodus04
Why just say this while you play:
1. For normal: 1, 2. Play a note on 1, and another note on 2.
2. For a triplet: 1, &, 2. Play a note on 1, another on &, and another on 2.

Right? Just get your metronome set and it shouldn't be too hard....

No, the way you've written it there just looks like you've divided one beat in half. That's not a triplet. It looks more like two eighth notes and a quarter note.

If you set your metronome to click on 1 then on 2 then on 3 then on 4 (quarter notes).

Then the way you have worded it sounds like you are suggesting the first and third notes of the triplet would both fall on clicks. That is not a triplet. That would be two eighth notes and a quarter note.

So
1. for normal quarter notes: play each click. (1 2 3 4 )
2. for normal eighth notes: play two even notes to each click (1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and )
3. for eighth note triplets: play three even notes to each click (1 tri plet 2 tri plet 3 tri plet 4 tri plet)
IMPORTANT the notes should be even. The triplet for example should not be three quick notes and then a rest before the 2. All the notes should be steady and even.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 25, 2012,