#1
a chord is named after the root note as everyone knows. However does the root note always have to be the note on the last string for it to be named after it? e.g an A chord contains A C# and E and in the first position the open A string is the last note. is this necessary or can these notes be played anywhere together for it to be an A chord.
#2
They can be played in any order and it'd be still be an A chord. They are then referred to as inversions, or slash chords, eg if E was the lowest note it would be A in 2nd inversion or A/E.
Oh, and if C# was the lowest note, that'd be first inversion or A/C#.
Last edited by MetalCommand at Mar 22, 2012,
#3
Yea it doesn't matter, it just gives it a different sound. It's the kind of thing that really depends on the chords that precede/follow it, to bring out the value of changing the root note. On it's own, for example, an A/C# is just a less distinctive version of an A chord. Whereas, played before a B, or after a C#m, or before an F#m, you can do a lot of interesting things with that when the notes on the A string change in an unusual way while the chords around it change.
#4
Quote by danyal92
a chord is named after the root note as everyone knows. However does the root note always have to be the note on the last string for it to be named after it? e.g an A chord contains A C# and E and in the first position the open A string is the last note. is this necessary or can these notes be played anywhere together for it to be an A chord.


The notes in A Major (A, C#, E) can be played in any order and it will still be an A major chord. If you play the C# in the bass, this is often called a 'slash chord' or A Maj/ C# (C sharp OVER A Maj). If you play the E in the bass, it will be A Maj/ E.

Also, you may want to look into inversions as this is another way of describing this concept. A maj in the first inversion is C#, E, A. In second inversion, E, A, C#.

Hope that helps.