#1
Hello dear members of UG!! I am wondering how to create melodic lead lines or solos on guitar and just improvise on them. Though I am not an expert or very proficient player with this improvisation thing and I mostly use scale runs or simple patterns for improvisation. For a couple while I have been experimenting to create melodic lead solo, but it seems I am not getting it right. So can anyone here please help me with this problem?
#2
Quote by stranger_23
Hello dear members of UG!! I am wondering how to create melodic lead lines or solos on guitar and just improvise on them. Though I am not an expert or very proficient player with this improvisation thing and I mostly use scale runs or simple patterns for improvisation. For a couple while I have been experimenting to create melodic lead solo, but it seems I am not getting it right. So can anyone here please help me with this problem?(Invalid img)
For a couple while I have been experimenting to create melodic lead solo,
#3
Try to hit chord tones on strong beat and use your ear as much as you can. Hitting chord tones gives the listenner a feeling of control and melody but ultimately listenning to your inner ear will make your solos that much more melodic. You can also try to sing the melody before playing it while listenning to the backing.
#4
you're not playing with your ears, you're playing with your fingers. which is precisely the reason that 95% of the guitar players i meet in every day life boast about how well they can improvise, when they truly have little to no idea what improvise means.

Quote by stranger_23
Though I am not an expert or very proficient player with this improvisation thing and I mostly use scale runs or simple patterns for improvisation.


stop relying on "scale runs" and "simple patterns". use your ear. play the guitar, don't let the guitar play you. train your ear to the point that you can hear what you play before you play it.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#5
Develop you ear! I will give you the same advice i give everyone else: guitar playing is 3 things;

Spirit: this is your ear/musical sense. When this is mastered, you should be able to play the guitar without having one on you (as in, know what every note/chord with sound like before you even play it on the thing)
Mind: This is your knowledge of music theory. Learn theory! you will be much better if you learn it inside and out, trust me.
Body: This is your technical ability. I feel that a lot of guitarists just strive for this and ignore the other 2, but they are all important.
These will not only help you with solo-writing, but song writing and composition as well
#6
@AeolianWolf: Thank you for your comment. I admit I am not an improviser, but I am trying be one. When I listen to any lead work, I try to figure them by myself, I get them pretty much close, but not all the time. I'm working on my ear training.
#7
@macashmack: First of all I'm thanking you for your constructive advice. You explained all the 3 components so nicely. I'm working on my knowledge of music theories like learning scales or arpeggios etc as well as my ear training. I am trying to pull lead works or music by listening to them, yet I am not so good at it and make mistakes sometimes. I also try to compose melody using natural major or minor scales, but they are not so good to listen to. Can you suggest the name of any particular scale that I should use to create soulful melodies?
#8
Thank you for the compliment
but for your question: No man you shouldn't be thinking of it like that.
When you can really hear the chords in your head, then the melody will follow. you should construct your melodies/lead/solo around the chords, NOT the other way around. Harmonies are much more important than melody, the melody will only sound the way it does because of the harmonies.
I would suggest that you take a solo that you really like, and instead of learning the solo, learn the chords that the solo is over. learn what they are, how to play them, how they work the way they do, and how they sound (sing the intervals!). This will work on all 3 aspects at the same time, albeit it won't be easy. After a few days of solidifying them in your head, take a look at the actual solo, and do the same thing as you did for the chords. After a few days of this, make a backing track of the chords, and just go with it. so long as you really get this down, you will play something that you will love, and it will flow through you
But, just cause i like this, The dorian mode is pretty nice. Heres a lesson on it: (Remember, don't just learn scales and shapes, learn intervals and chords, the shapes/scales are simply a guide, its the intervals that are important)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qDyka-X0fc
#9
Hi. It really helps to know the notes in the chords that are used, and to target those notes over the chords. If you have two or more chords in a row with a mutual note, it sounds cool to hold the note over the changing chords.

If the rhythm part has certain dynamics and accents, try and match these accents with your lead line, it further emphasises the rhythmic feel and sounds really tight.

You can apply these ideas to any scales/modes, arpeggios etc.

Hope this helps too