#1
I decided that a good way to get out of this hole I've been in with my playing is to learn scales. The first thing I read is to learn the chromatic scale. I then looked up the scale, only to find three different versions. While this tripped me up, I practiced one of the versions, and then moved on to the c scale. This is the version I found:

E----0-3----------
B----1-3---------
G----0-2---------
D----0-2---------
A----0-3---------
E----0-3---------

I thought that was great, until I found a completely different version. Anyway, can someone help me out here? Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.
#2
you don't need to make the same thread multiple times in different forums...
It's over simplified, So what!

Quote by eGraham
I'm going to be on top of what is called a knob
Quote by theguitarist
Big ones can be fun in some ways but generally, they are a pain in the ass.
Quote by Wolfinator-x
I don't know what is going on in this thread or why I have an erection.
#3
I'm sorry, I was told to go here and didn't know what to do, so I just reposted.
#4
Quote by Obsceneairwaves
you don't need to make the same thread multiple times in different forums...

I told him to put it here.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
Quote by sam b
Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#6
Quote by meh217
I decided that a good way to get out of this hole I've been in with my playing is to learn scales. The first thing I read is to learn the chromatic scale. I then looked up the scale, only to find three different versions. While this tripped me up, I practiced one of the versions, and then moved on to the c scale. This is the version I found:

E----0-3----------
B----1-3---------
G----0-2---------
D----0-2---------
A----0-3---------
E----0-3---------

I thought that was great, until I found a completely different version. Anyway, can someone help me out here? Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.


E,G,A,C,D,E,G,A,C,D,E,G Those are the notes you just posted this is a C major pentatonic in the open position however, you asked for the major scale which you know as well as I that is C,D,E,F,G,A,B. If you learned the notes of the fretboard you would know where to play It and ultimately this is what I think would be best for you but I know you would prefer to be given more information so there I go.

In the 8th position (root on the low E string)

E----10-12-13--------
B----10-12-13--------
G----9-10-12---------
D----9-10-12---------
A----8-10-12---------
E----8-10-12---------

Basically, you got the C, D, E on the low E string; F, G, A on the A string; B,C,D on the D string; E, F, G on the G string; A, B, C on the B string; and D, E, F on the high E string.
#7
Let me explain in more detail what was I told you before. The major pentatonic is built on the following degree of the major scale I showed you: 1,2,3,5,6. This basically mean that you take the 1st note of the major scale, the 2nd, the 3rd, skip the 4th, play the 5th and lastly play the 6th and not play the 7th note. This is a good sounding scale and it is useful in its own right but you need to know the major scale as well. I showed you how to play it in the 8th position and it will work for now but you will want to figure out how to play it all over the neck eventually but not right now.
#8
I think your problem is that you seem to be thinking of scales simply as fret numbers on the guitar. This might be why you are coming to the (wrong) conclusions that there are 3 different "versions" of the Chromatic Scale, and there is more than one "version" of the C major scale. In fact, scales themselves have little to do specifically with the guitar, and are applicable to (almost) all instruments. This is why understanding what they are (and not just how to play them) is important. I'll try to explain each scale simply.

CHROMATIC

The Chromatic scale is simply every note. All of them. Play all 12 tones that exist in the Western music system. You can start anywhere on the guitar, and as long as you play all 12 notes, you've done it. I usually wouldn't use such a thing for creating actual music though. I can recommend it for finger-training exercises.

C MAJOR

The C major scale is just one of the 12 major scales.
It is constructed from the notes C D E F G A B C. That's it. That's the only version.
Anywhere you find those exact notes on the guitar, this specific scale can be played. There is no right or wrong position for the scale, and no other versions. All the diagrams you see online are simply showing you how to play the same scale in different places. No new versions, no mess.

All major scales are constructed the same way using a handy formula.
But before I go there, I want to know if you know all the names of all the notes. Do you know any basic music theory? Do you know the names of all the notes on your fretboard, and can you name them with ease?
If the answers to these questions are 'no', then I think a little bit of theory education will do far more for your understanding of music than scales can ever teach you. I recommend checking out musictheory.net . Start the lessons from the beginning, and skip nothing. The lessons are taught using a piano as a reference, which will help your understanding of music from being too guitar- dependent, and more universal.

Have I helped?
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#9
Quote by MattyBoy 1337
I think your problem is that you seem to be thinking of scales simply as fret numbers on the guitar. This might be why you are coming to the (wrong) conclusions that there are 3 different "versions" of the Chromatic Scale, and there is more than one "version" of the C major scale. In fact, scales themselves have little to do specifically with the guitar, and are applicable to (almost) all instruments. This is why understanding what they are (and not just how to play them) is important. I'll try to explain each scale simply.

CHROMATIC

The Chromatic scale is simply every note. All of them. Play all 12 tones that exist in the Western music system. You can start anywhere on the guitar, and as long as you play all 12 notes, you've done it. I usually wouldn't use such a thing for creating actual music though. I can recommend it for finger-training exercises.

C MAJOR

The C major scale is just one of the 12 major scales.
It is constructed from the notes C D E F G A B C. That's it. That's the only version.
Anywhere you find those exact notes on the guitar, this specific scale can be played. There is no right or wrong position for the scale, and no other versions. All the diagrams you see online are simply showing you how to play the same scale in different places. No new versions, no mess.

All major scales are constructed the same way using a handy formula.
But before I go there, I want to know if you know all the names of all the notes. Do you know any basic music theory? Do you know the names of all the notes on your fretboard, and can you name them with ease?
If the answers to these questions are 'no', then I think a little bit of theory education will do far more for your understanding of music than scales can ever teach you. I recommend checking out. musictheory.net . Start the lessons from the beginning, and skip nothing. The lessons are taught using a piano as a reference, which will help your understanding of music from being too guitar- dependent, and more universal.

Have I helped?


Yeah, tremendously. I'll go check out the site. Thanks.