#1
A friend and I have tried to record the drums but where we are located the sounds just bounce all over the place and cause echoes.. Yes, we've set up the walls to have sponges and their is a nice carpet both under the drums set and in the middle of the room. The room is a bit small so that might be an unsolvable factor.

I've seen these little boxes which contain a recording device and a speaker. Supposedly this helps to record the drums clean without the problems stated above.

But, I was hoping maybe some of you have alternative solutions as to how this can be solved?

We've moved the drums in the garage but it's not good there either which makes me really think that the only solution would be to get one of those drum-recording-boxes...

Any help would be cool!
#2
What are you trying to record with? At minimum, you'll need at least 3 mics.
#3
As stated, knowing your mic'ing technique would help. I'm sure there's more you can do to deaden the room too. Try hanging duvets on the walls etc
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#4
Quote by GaryS
What are you trying to record with? At minimum, you'll need at least 3 mics.



2 mics they're both Shure mics and are used for vocals. They are 2 meters away from the drums. We've tried putting them closer and further but we've decided to just keep at 2 meters cause the sound was only then optimal.

O = Drums
x = Microphones

------x
O
------x

I know it's probably the bigger fail you've heard of, but that's how it is atm...
#5
Quote by Paddy McK
As stated, knowing your mic'ing technique would help. I'm sure there's more you can do to deaden the room too. Try hanging duvets on the walls etc


Alright I'll give that a try. Should their be anything on the ceiling, because that of course has nothing just the ceiling itself... Not sure if it plays a role, but I think it's does..
#6
Vocal mics are never going to work too well as overheads because they're very directional, meaning they won't pick up much of the sound. To be honest, I would just try using MIDI drums. You won't be able to get near a decent level of sound quality with your current setup
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Always up for some C4C, been compared to Frank Turner, The Cure's Robert Smith and Bruce Springsteen so check out my stuff if you like the sound of that
#7
Quote by Devilish Dave
Alright I'll give that a try. Should their be anything on the ceiling, because that of course has nothing just the ceiling itself... Not sure if it plays a role, but I think it's does..

And yes, any surface that can possibly be reflective should be deadened.
My Soundcloud
Always up for some C4C, been compared to Frank Turner, The Cure's Robert Smith and Bruce Springsteen so check out my stuff if you like the sound of that
#8
Quote by Paddy McK
Vocal mics are never going to work too well as overheads because they're very directional, meaning they won't pick up much of the sound. To be honest, I would just try using MIDI drums. You won't be able to get near a decent level of sound quality with your current setup



How would you setup a midi drum?

I've seent these elctronics drum set but they cost well over 2K
#9
What recording program are you using? Most recording software has built-in sequencers and MIDI voices that can be used to create drum tracks
My Soundcloud
Always up for some C4C, been compared to Frank Turner, The Cure's Robert Smith and Bruce Springsteen so check out my stuff if you like the sound of that
#10
Quote by Paddy McK
What recording program are you using? Most recording software has built-in sequencers and MIDI voices that can be used to create drum tracks



I'm using Adobe Audition CS5.5
#12
Quote by L2112Lif
False, recorderman position:




I'll try it out and can you please if possible send me a link to a affordable drum mic? Cause these vocal mics are actually pretty bad for this. The person who posted earlier was right. I totally forgot about that, that these vocal mics are made differently...
#13
A few things here...

1. How many mics you need depends on the sound you want. Those vintage '50's and '60's drum recordings were done with one or two mics in a room. That's how they get "that sound." (which was the sound they always got when they recorded drums up until then, whether it was a jazz band, a big band, or whatever). It wasn't until George Martin was producing the Beatles that close-miking drums became a conventional method. If you want the drums to sound "in your face" then you need the mics up "in the face" of the drum kit. That means, the more mics the merrier.

2. Correct that the vocal mics are not the best choice for drum overheads. However, not because of how directional they are. They are mostly not the best choice simply because they are dynamic mics, and being a "room mic" is not something that dynamic mics do well at. Kinda like how you CAN drive a screw by bashing it really hard with a hammer, but it's not a good choice. Directional mics are actually preferable over omni mics because it is that directionality that allows the overheads to be perceived as having a stereo width. Consider the opposite... two omni mics. Each omni mic, by its very nature, is picking up the whole area around it equally. That means that there is *very* little difference between what the left and right mics are picking up. That's not going to give you much of a stereo image.

3. Sound tends to travel in all directions. (though this is somewhat frequency dependent... bass frequencies are truly omnidirectional, while higher frequencies travel more linearly) That means that controlling reflections means all four walls, the ceiling and the floor.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
Borrow a pair of condenser mics from someone, and use those as your overheads. Then put one of the Shures on the bass drum, and the other on the snare. That'll do the job.
#16
post clips when your done, im in a similar predicament and am curious about getting good drum sounds as well.
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