#1
This may be a stupid question, but I ask anyway.

I am thinking about trying the Ernie ball Cobalt 10-46 strings. Will this work well for my guitar? The reason I ask is because this kind of strings have a new kind of technology, so I just want to be 100% sure.

Guitar: Eagle Stratocaster AE10 TR http://www.eaglemusic.no/nettbutikk/gitar-elektrisk/eagle-elektrisk-gitar/eagle-elektrisk-gitar-strat-kopi-ae10-tr/

Amp: Randall NBKing 112

The cobalt strings: http://www.ernieball.com/products/electric-strings/4978/cobalt-regular-slinky


Thanks!
#3
NO, DON"T DO IT! These strings have a new resonance expansion technology that will obliterate all plants and animals in a 3 mile radius. In addition, if you strum an E chord a wild bear will attack your family. Think man, think.

No in all seriousness though, they are just strings bro you are fine.
#4
Quote by shredder3386
NO, DON"T DO IT! These strings have a new resonance expansion technology that will obliterate all plants and animals in a 3 mile radius. In addition, if you strum an E chord a wild bear will attack your family. Think man, think.

No in all seriousness though, they are just strings bro you are fine.
Great, thank you!
Just wanted to be TOTALLY sure because of the new technology :3
#5
Wow, the marketing team over at EB must really be patting themselves on the back today.

There is no new technology. There is a tiny change in the metallurgy. They will sound ever so slightly different from other sets of strings. That's all.
#6
Quote by Roc8995
Wow, the marketing team over at EB must really be patting themselves on the back today.

There is no new technology. There is a tiny change in the metallurgy. They will sound ever so slightly different from other sets of strings. That's all.
Ok, thanks for information
#7
Double the price of a pack of slinkys for what? New Metallurgy? That is an outrage! I cry foul play!
#8
Quote by Roc8995
Wow, the marketing team over at EB must really be patting themselves on the back today.

There is no new technology. There is a tiny change in the metallurgy. They will sound ever so slightly different from other sets of strings. That's all.


i'm waiting for mine to come in but i've actually heard quite the different. from the people i've talked to they have said that the increased output is verbs significant, modest improvement in tone, and the feel of them is great.

i'm pretty psyched for mine to come in
#9
Yes, the tone will probably change more than "slightly different." That was the wrong choice of words.

Still, there's nothing technologically different about them. They don't work on different principles than other strings. This is like a hammer with a plastic handle instead of a wooden one - sure, it's a couple ounces lighter, and it feels a little different, but it's not exactly new technology and it certainly isn't going to do anything surprising when you hit a nail with it.
#10
Quote by Roc8995
Yes, the tone will probably change more than "slightly different." That was the wrong choice of words.

Still, there's nothing technologically different about them. They don't work on different principles than other strings. This is like a hammer with a plastic handle instead of a wooden one - sure, it's a couple ounces lighter, and it feels a little different, but it's not exactly new technology and it certainly isn't going to do anything surprising when you hit a nail with it.


Well take a look at this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9D07MNu2EVE
Especially at 00:35 where he isn't plugged in...
#12
I've tried most different types of strings on the market, and keep coming back to one old favorite. I think I'll try some of these too if i can find a set in town this afternoon. The videos have intrigued me.
PRS SC245
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#13
Quote by <<I>>
Well take a look at this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9D07MNu2EVE
Especially at 00:35 where he isn't plugged in...

What exactly was this supposed to show? Yeah, they sound different. Hooray. Nothing new, technology-wise.

What I was trying to convey with the difference in sound comment was that it's not going to add reverb or sound like all of a sudden you're using a Recto instead of a twin reverb. The sound difference is significant but not drastic.
#14
Quote by Roc8995
The sound difference is significant but not drastic.

We guitarists are notorious for spending large sums of money chasing very subtle tonal changes.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#15
Yes, and it's great that strings are cheap and easy to experiment with. None of this is relevant to the question of "will it work?"

I was just saying that they're not technologically different than regular strings and that they wouldn't make a person sound massively and jarringly different.
#16
Quote by Roc8995
I was just saying that they're not technologically different than regular strings and that they wouldn't make a person sound massively and jarringly different.

No, of course not. I don't think anyone could make a case that they would. Sometimes, though, a little change can make us feel a bit better about our playing. If, as the video suggested, they indeed have a 'better' feel, I would be interested in knowing if i could indeed feel it as well, and whether or not I would actually perceive it as 'better' for my own playing. Yes, it's great that strings are a cheap and easy thing to try.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#17

If they weren't being touted as very bright I'd try a set. It seems the trend right now is towards brighter and brighter strings, often with "more output" as a selling point. Unfortunately, I don't want more brightness or magnet pull from my strings. Hopefully they'll keep making more sets, though. It seems that we have a lot more options now than even 5 years ago.
#18
Quote by Roc8995
Yes, the tone will probably change more than "slightly different." That was the wrong choice of words.

Still, there's nothing technologically different about them. They don't work on different principles than other strings. This is like a hammer with a plastic handle instead of a wooden one - sure, it's a couple ounces lighter, and it feels a little different, but it's not exactly new technology and it certainly isn't going to do anything surprising when you hit a nail with it.


they r just trying new things. just like they did with the titanium coated strings (also something to try out).

the cobalt, whether it be denser or whatever, allows the pickups to grab more of the subtleties as well as give more output because the pickups are able to pick up so much more. also, as with the titanium coated ones, the actual feel of the strings will be different. these are supposed to be much smoother against your fingers. callused or not, a little less wear and tear on your fingers is welcome to any guitarist playing for extended amounts of time
#19
Quote by shredder3386
NO, DON"T DO IT! These strings have a new resonance expansion technology that will obliterate all plants and animals in a 3 mile radius. In addition, if you strum an E chord a wild bear will attack your family. Think man, think.

No in all seriousness though, they are just strings bro you are fine.



you make me lol
#20
Quote by andrerist
they r just trying new things. just like they did with the titanium coated strings (also something to try out).

i think the issue is that they are trying new things and then marketing it as a "tremendous move forward" when if you see through all the hype it seems like all they've really done is wound the strings with cobalt instead of nickel. which makes absolutely no difference whatsoever to the plain strings, for obvious reasons.

having said that, i'm willing to put all this aside and actually get one cobalt set just to try, even though i don't really want brighter strings with more output that are going to wear out my frets even faster
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#21
mine are on the way. they are not even in stores, i had to order them from amazon. its even worse that i use hybrid 10-52s...

anyways. i am in a string change phase. i am testing 9s (which i have never put on my les before), boomers, helix, and these strings.

my 3 main area will be longevity, feel, and changes in tone (which i am assuming will be from slight output changes from the strings / pickups)

to date, my favorite strings are standard slinkys and dean markley blue steels.
#22
I'm sure the paid gushing from Slash will help EB out. I'm tired of seeing his face everywhere.
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#23
Quote by andrerist
they r just trying new things. just like they did with the titanium coated strings (also something to try out).

the cobalt, whether it be denser or whatever, allows the pickups to grab more of the subtleties as well as give more output because the pickups are able to pick up so much more. also, as with the titanium coated ones, the actual feel of the strings will be different. these are supposed to be much smoother against your fingers. callused or not, a little less wear and tear on your fingers is welcome to any guitarist playing for extended amounts of time
Yep, I have understood that they are pretty much like every other strings. But more output? I just want to be sure that this works well for my pickups, because they are not the best if you now what I mean. And I think it is wasting to buy new pickups just for playing with different strings.. and the pickups will probablt be more expensive than the guitar :P
#24
They're too bright for my taste, imo.

Quote by ikey_
to date, my favorite strings are standard slinkys and dean markley blue steels.


Blue Steels? I tried those. "We froze them in liquid nitrogen!" Such a gimmick...
My experience with strings thus far...
Last edited by blakeg14 at Mar 26, 2012,
#25
Quote by Blompcube
i think the issue is that they are trying new things and then marketing it as a "tremendous move forward" when if you see through all the hype it seems like all they've really done is wound the strings with cobalt instead of nickel. which makes absolutely no difference whatsoever to the plain strings, for obvious reasons.

having said that, i'm willing to put all this aside and actually get one cobalt set just to try, even though i don't really want brighter strings with more output that are going to wear out my frets even faster


You sure?

I was under the impression that all the strings were using a cobalt alloy?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#26
Quote by Arby911
You sure?

I was under the impression that all the strings were using a cobalt alloy?

no, i'm not entirely sure, which is why i said "it seems like". it's very rare for the plain strings to be any different in any string sets, though.

for example, the plain strings in the rock 'n' roll slinky sets are the same as the standard slinky sets, but the wound strings are wound with pure nickel rather than nickel-plated steel. and on one of their videos they were comparing cobalt only to types of metals that are typically used for windings, and these are the main reasons why i have come to that conclusion.

I could be wrong though.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.