Page 1 of 2
#1
Right now I'm at a point where I really want a new guitar, but I've found that I am so indecisive that I cannot make up my mind (see: past threads). A few days ago a speaker came to our school to speak about financial responsibility and smart spending habits, and it occurred to me that I might want to buy something that will retain its value.
Questions:
What brands retain their value over time? The only ones I could think of off the top of my head would be the popular old-guard brands, Gibson and Fender.
Would a low-end Gibson Les Paul (say a Studio) retain its value over time?
I play mostly hard rock and metal, bands like Alter Bridge, Coheed and Cambria, Metallica, and Killswitch Engage to name a few, through a Fender Super Champ XD, but I don't gig.
As an aside, my main reason for changing my guitar is because I'm simply not comfortable with it - it's a teeny little paperthin SG and I'm a fairly big guy, so I want something a little beefier (hence the Les Paul). So no 'you should get a new amp' reccomendations, please.
Any insight or advice would be great
#2
Most of the low-end Gibsons hold some value, but not like a Standard or Custom. But they normaly will not get above there "new" price for @ 20ish yrs. The older Studios with Ebony finger-boards might do better than current ones that dont have this anymore
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#3
seriously? unless its pre CBS fender or pre Ernie Ball MM, made pre 1980 or by a custom luthier then its not really worth it.
#4
I'd go for an Epiphone Gibson Remake.
They're pretty modestly priced, but I find there isn't a huge quality difference between the actual Gibsons. From there, it's yours to decide between Les Paul, SG, Explorer, Flying V, whatever you want.
Quote by GuitarGod_92
when I die of a brain aneurysm I want it on record that its the film threads fault

Quote by GuitarGod_92
Movies are all bad every last one of them

Quote by yope
Fungus has a right to exist. It's a valid life form.
#5
I don't think you should look at buying a new guitar as an investment, IMHO. My guitar teacher has a pre-CBS Fender Strat made in the early 60's that she tells me is worth at the least over $15,000, but that is the only instance I can look at a guitar as a genuine investment, and she isn't looking to sell it either. Don't let resale value affect your purchase, let your ear decide for you.
The time to hesitate is through..

Gear:
Fender 60's Road Worn Strat
Epiphone Les Paul '56 Gold Top
Orange Tiny Terror Combo


Quote by Draken
and the stig. American Stig would be a fat guy with a nascar hat.
#6
unless it is rare and/or unique when its new, a guitar will not be a good investment piece. the reality is that guitars do not become more expensive until they become collectible, which can only happen if they are rare enough. most guitars made today simply aren't rare enough to go up in value over the years.

that being said, a new model may prove to become iconic down the road. my bet would be on something completely new having its value increase, not a modern version of an older design
#7
I have a number of early Gibsons that have creat value to collectors,but choosing which one will be more valuable in the future is'nt really feasable. the studio series is definitely not one of themThey're mass produced from average stock to put a Les Paul in somebody,s hands for about a $1000.Custom shops or discontinued classics are probably your best bet.But they're not cheap and there are no guarantee,s.II've got a 59 left handed gold top les paul thats worth a fortune,and I don't like the way it plays.The finishes did'nt last.The p90,s were wired badly and the neckset was'nt great.They discontinued them for problems,then re-issued them in 68&69.I've got a 68 and love it.I've also got a black 68 custom.It's a great guitar,plays well,weighs a ton.I rarely use it.Just pick a good guitar you like,as far as an investment goes,there really no way to figure out which it will be.Good Luck,have fun.panhead201
#8
I collect a wide variety of things. When it comes to collecting things as an investment, certain rules are universal:

1) buy what you love, because it may never increase in value, so you may be owning it for a while.

2) take good care of it. Make sure you know what that means- many very valuable items have had their value literally decimated by misguided attempts at care.*

3) don't expect a quick return...but always keep an eye on the market, just in case there is a run.

4) keep track of what you paid for it and where you got it. If it something used, see if you can find out who the previous owners were, If they were famous, make sure you have it authenticated BEFORE you buy it as a piece of memorabilia.


* and unless YOU are/become famous, that may mean not playing it yourself.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#9
Buying guitars as an investment generally doesn't pay off that well. Buy them to play. If it is a quality instrument and you take care of it, it will always hold some value. The days of rapidly appreciating vintage guitar values ended several years ago. A friend of mine has a very nice 1952 Les Paul that he was offered $25,000 for five years ago and turned it down. Today he can't get $15,000.

Sometimes you can get lucky though. A year or so ago I stumbled onto a 1969 Gibson Byrdland for $2,200. I snatched it up and turned it a few months later for $4,200.
#10
You could always look at a guitar as an investment in that you play the guitar, get better, start playing shows, get signed, then get money.

But that's unlikely, just like getting any real value from a modern, production built guitar in the long run.
#11
With a name like dannyalcatraz you must be one of those self taught lawwyers.It would,nt seem to inspire much confidence in your client,s though, if you get signed,rich and famous,what the hell do you care what the guitar.Worry more about the color of your next Ferrari
#12
Quote by panhead201
With a name like dannyalcatraz you must be one of those self taught lawwyers.


???
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#13
Quote by dannyalcatraz
* and unless YOU are/become famous, that may mean not playing it yourself.


Yep this right here.... if you are going to 'invest' in a guitar, aside from the occasional restring and polish it really should be living in its case.

If you want to make money you're much better looking at being a guitar trader... hunting down good deals on cl & ebay, giving them a clean up and re-selling. Plenty of people I know have built up a really nice collection of gear with only the money they have made doing this... not to mention the wealth of experience gained along the way.
#14
I currently have a Vox Constellation IV Bass manufactured in 1967 or 1968.

According to the Vox 1968 catalogue, it retailed for $395 USD ($1766 in 2012 dollars).

I purchased it used in 1974 for $89.00 CAD which would be $398.00 in 2012 Canadian dollars.

Currently one is available for purchase from Chicago Music Exchange for $1695.00 USD. It is missing the bridge cover, the on board effects are bypassed leading me to believe they are broken (no one has been able to reverse engineer a repair of the sealed unit) and two of the control knobs are damaged. There is also no mention of the original case in the listing.
Link here.

Another one listed at Live Auctioneers was valued at $640 - $960 USD and sold for $775 USD in 2011. Its condition was "fair", pick guard missing, two damaged knobs, chipped machine head, no case and not sure if working properly. Link here.

Mine with original case and all effects fully functional.


I owned many guitars and basses, this is the only one that has potentially increased in value, however I have held onto it for 37+ years which represents a pretty piss poor return on investment overall.

It is a unique shape, limited production run (2 years), has "Voxtronics" effects which are also rare to be working, there is some history, they were made by a contract manufacturer in Italy, etc. They actually devalued when Vox reissued some teardrop basses (closer to the Wyman signature than the Constellation).

Now to the point, this instrument was not purchased as an investment and it has turned out to have increased in value, but the return on investment would be around 5-7% per year. Would I sell it? Probably not, it was my first guitar and it has a lot of history with me, I have a story for every ding and dent. Also, it was a guitar a ten year old kid bought after saving up six months of newspaper delivery money and I still play it all the time.

If I were to look at the rest of the instruments I have owned, they are common and have been in production for a lot of years. Do I think my Epiphone Les Paul Custom will be worth anything in 30 years, doubt it, they are as common as dirt. My Godins are wonderful guitars, but I wouldn't expect it to increase in value ever. All the other guitars I have purchased and either sold or given away have been worth no more and usually less than I bought them for, even the "name brand" guitars. The only reason I know the value of this guitar is for insurance purposes.

My Belief
Guitars are not an investment, they are pointless unless they are played. I don't expect a return on my money and rarely sell any instrument that I have purchased. The ones I no longer have were passed along to people who would play and appreciate them.

TLDR

I own one guitar that has increased in value, but to be considered an investment I would have to sell it. That will not happen since this guitar has been a part of my life for approaching 40 years. That history compared to $700 to $1000 profit makes the decision to keep it as a playable instrument I enjoy as opposed to an investment pretty obvious.

What Kind of Guitar You Should Buy?

Whatever is comfortable to play and gives you the sounds and features you want. Resale value is irrelevant. To justify my long post, I bought a guitar I liked and from a value point of view, I am still using the same bass guitar 37+ years later. That is good value.
If I miss one day of practice, I notice it.
If I miss two days, the critics notice it.
If I miss three days, the audience notices it.

Ingacy Jan Paderewski (1860 - 1941)
Last edited by Quintex at Mar 25, 2012,
#15
Unless it's from that manufacture's "golden period" then a guitar is a crap investment. There are so many Les Pauls around these days, they're not that special or hard to get hold of anymore.
#16
I agree with most people here. I don't look at my guitar purchases as investments per se. BUT... in the sense that I can buy a guitar, play it for a year (while keeping it in the same overall condition other than a bit of fret wear, naturally), and then sell it for either the same price or slightly higher (due to having bought it at a low price), that is definitely a profit. Of all the time I spent playing the damn thing, and even if I just break even on the re-sell, that has meant a gain.
#17
Quote by fixationdarknes
Of all the time I spent playing the damn thing, and even if I just break even on the re-sell, that has meant a gain.


Thats the way to look at it... I take it one step further, I figure if i buy a guitar for $1000 and sell it 2 years later for only $800 - Then that guitar has only cost me $100 per year to play and enjoy.

Its not like investing in a non-tangible asset, if you get use out of it, and then deduct what that use was 'worth' you rarely lose much money.

But I guess what all this is really saying is: No, investing in guitars is not a particulalry profitable exercise - but for some its not so much about the money as it is for the enjoyment, and if you make a little cash on the side than thats a bonus
#18
You can make money by buying and selling guitars, but not huge amounts. I don't look at it as an investment that will make me rich in the future, just as a way of saving money for the guitars I really want.

I regularly trawl eBay's new listings, looking for guitars listed by idiots who don't really know what they're doing. I buy the guitars that have ridiculously low buy now prices and then sell them on at auction - I reckon I've done it around 10-15 times and so far I've never failed to make a profit. It's usually with cheap entry level guitars being sold by parents that bought a guitar for their kid who then lost interest, so I'm only talking about buying for £20-40 and selling for £50-70. It's not much, but it's still profit.

You have to know that the guitar you're buying regularly sells for more than you're paying (including p&p) in regular auction listings though, otherwise you could just as easily end up losing money.

It probably also helps that I don't live in a particularly highly populated area - if I see an auction listing that is collection only in my area, there's a good chance it will finish with a low price because people won't travel to pick it up. I can buy it and collect it, then sell it on offering delivery and it's guaranteed profit. That's less common than the ridiculously cheap buy now findings though.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#19
Quote by stormin1155
Buying guitars as an investment generally doesn't pay off that well. Buy them to play. If it is a quality instrument and you take care of it, it will always hold some value. The days of rapidly appreciating vintage guitar values ended several years ago. A friend of mine has a very nice 1952 Les Paul that he was offered $25,000 for five years ago and turned it down. Today he can't get $15,000.

Sometimes you can get lucky though. A year or so ago I stumbled onto a 1969 Gibson Byrdland for $2,200. I snatched it up and turned it a few months later for $4,200.

Nice buy on theByrdland,They were just so damn big.I bought a 72 ES-355-TDSV,Lyre vibrato,100% original,OHSC,It just had about an 1/8th inch of nicotine on it.I was scared to clean it,I thought the finish might come off with the smoke.It did'nt.It's beautiful.I still have it,it's the turd brown one in my pics.Paid $750 for it in a little pawn shop on the loop around Atlanta.But the chances of find stuff like your B=land or my ES are worse than winning the lottery.Like you said,buy quality,take care of it,but don't get your hopes up.I bought that ES in 98.panhead201
#20
Quote by WholeLottaIzzy
Unless it's from that manufacture's "golden period" then a guitar is a crap investment. There are so many Les Pauls around these days, they're not that special or hard to get hold of anymore.

Nice cover,man.....really cool Tele!panhead201,your right about the Les Pauls,but theres still some good ones.I've got an original 59 lefty Goldtop and a 68 black Custom.I just found a 68 lefty Goldtop on friday and bought it.I'm waiting for the fedex guy like a kid waiting for Sandy Claws.In the pics it's like a 9.5 outta 10.I either got Photoshopped or lucky.The guy has a 100% rep.Oh well,Tuesday,s a long way off.panhead201
#21
Quote by Quintex
I currently have a Vox Constellation IV Bass manufactured in 1967 or 1968.

According to the Vox 1968 catalogue, it retailed for $395 USD ($1766 in 2012 dollars).

I purchased it used in 1974 for $89.00 CAD which would be $398.00 in 2012 Canadian dollars.

Currently one is available for purchase from Chicago Music Exchange for $1695.00 USD. It is missing the bridge cover, the on board effects are bypassed leading me to believe they are broken (no one has been able to reverse engineer a repair of the sealed unit) and two of the control knobs are damaged. There is also no mention of the original case in the listing.
Link here.

Another one listed at Live Auctioneers was valued at $640 - $960 USD and sold for $775 USD in 2011. Its condition was "fair", pick guard missing, two damaged knobs, chipped machine head, no case and not sure if working properly. Link here.

Mine with original case and all effects fully functional.


I owned many guitars and basses, this is the only one that has potentially increased in value, however I have held onto it for 37+ years which represents a pretty piss poor return on investment overall.

It is a unique shape, limited production run (2 years), has "Voxtronics" effects which are also rare to be working, there is some history, they were made by a contract manufacturer in Italy, etc. They actually devalued when Vox reissued some teardrop basses (closer to the Wyman signature than the Constellation).

Now to the point, this instrument was not purchased as an investment and it has turned out to have increased in value, but the return on investment would be around 5-7% per year. Would I sell it? Probably not, it was my first guitar and it has a lot of history with me, I have a story for every ding and dent. Also, it was a guitar a ten year old kid bought after saving up six months of newspaper delivery money and I still play it all the time.

If I were to look at the rest of the instruments I have owned, they are common and have been in production for a lot of years. Do I think my Epiphone Les Paul Custom will be worth anything in 30 years, doubt it, they are as common as dirt. My Godins are wonderful guitars, but I wouldn't expect it to increase in value ever. All the other guitars I have purchased and either sold or given away have been worth no more and usually less than I bought them for, even the "name brand" guitars. The only reason I know the value of this guitar is for insurance purposes.

My Belief
Guitars are not an investment, they are pointless unless they are played. I don't expect a return on my money and rarely sell any instrument that I have purchased. The ones I no longer have were passed along to people who would play and appreciate them.

TLDR

I own one guitar that has increased in value, but to be considered an investment I would have to sell it. That will not happen since this guitar has been a part of my life for approaching 40 years. That history compared to $700 to $1000 profit makes the decision to keep it as a playable instrument I enjoy as opposed to an investment pretty obvious.

What Kind of Guitar You Should Buy?

Whatever is comfortable to play and gives you the sounds and features you want. Resale value is irrelevant. To justify my long post, I bought a guitar I liked and from a value point of view, I am still using the same bass guitar 37+ years later. That is good value.

Beautiful Vox,man.Yeah you're right about the Investment part.I've got a 64 Gibson ES-330-TDC.I got it new in 65,a grand was a lotta money for a homeless kid in 65 in NYC,I had worked off the books for em for a year,and they GAVE it to me.I was so scared somebody was gonna steal it I moved to Boston a week later,and unless my kid needed a kidney or something,I'll br buried with it.Buy quality you reaay like,treat it right,hope for the best.Don't bank on it,though.panhead201I really like the Vox and I'm half ass looking for a bass,but I need something you can sit down and play.I don't think one like yours would make it.I've been looking at higher end Warwick,s.I need a guitar type neck.I tried a 5 grand Ken Smith,It was like playing a picnic table with strings on it.
Last edited by panhead201 at Mar 25, 2012,
#22
Quote by panhead201
Nice cover,man.....really cool Tele!panhead201,your right about the Les Pauls,but theres still some good ones.I've got an original 59 lefty Goldtop and a 68 black Custom.I just found a 68 lefty Goldtop on friday and bought it.I'm waiting for the fedex guy like a kid waiting for Sandy Claws.In the pics it's like a 9.5 outta 10.I either got Photoshopped or lucky.The guy has a 100% rep.Oh well,Tuesday,s a long way off.panhead201

Hey thanks. It's very rough. I didn't learn it properly so it's out of time and tune sometimes not a good representation of my playing but thanks all the same. The guitar is a Fender JA-90. I've since sold it. But yeah, it's a very nice guitar.

You have a 59 Goldtop? That's awesome.
#24
Quote by WholeLottaIzzy
Hey thanks. It's very rough. I didn't learn it properly so it's out of time and tune sometimes not a good representation of my playing but thanks all the same. The guitar is a Fender JA-90. I've since sold it. But yeah, it's a very nice guitar.

You have a 59 Goldtop? That's awesome.

Yeah,I got a 59 lefty Goldtop,but they discontinued em for a reason.it looks kinda pink and the wiring was half ass.The first re-issue was in 68.They made em for 68-69.I bought the lefty 68 on Friday.I'm gonna wear out this keyboard hitting fedex tracking so many times.He labeled it Medical Equip.Get it tuesday but I live way out in the country on a 1/2 mile private road.Fedex andUPS just leave stuff on my porch.So this is SIG required.And I'm going to town to buy numbers to stick on my mailbox.panhead.....I don't know if your being modest but if thats a lousy rep of your playing you ain't doin too bad.
#25
Finding a deal on a guitar that's worth thousands more than you paid is rare. You're much more likely to pay more than its worth - and maybe more than it will ever be worth in the high-end vintage market. However, deals on guitars that regularly sell for hundreds more than you might pay are fairly common.

Who knew that MIJ guitars would go up in value? Desirable models often go for more than they cost new-sometimes much more. You can still find deals. My 1979 MIJ Ibanez was $90 to me about 10 years ago. It goes for about $500 now and some people ask more than that. My MIJ ESP Tele copy was $165. Some sellers ask up to $1,000 - but $600 is realistic. Both were bought used from music stores. I also have an ESP MIJ P-Bass copy that was $175 – also from a music store.

In general, I won't buy a guitar unless it's at least a couple hundred less than I know it's worth. Most can be sold for at least double of what I paid. Lower end, not-quite-vintage instruments that can retain or gain value are almost always MIJ or USA. However, finding great deals are not every day occurrences-but are common enough if you do enough digging. You have to do your homework. Buying for yourself is really no different than what dealers, buying to re-sell for profit do. I dabble in selling and trading but not that much.
EBMM JP6, EBMM Bongo Bass 5-string, Heritage H140CM, ESP Tele Copy, ESP P-Bass Copy, ESP Maverick, Fender HM Strat, Ibanez ST-55, Epiphone Broadway, Taylor 310, Seagull S-12, Musicman Sixty-Five Reverb, Fender HRD, Ampeg B-25B
#26
Quote by Apollo 13
VOX guitars and old Gibson's are a good buy. If you can find one!

I had some surgery and lost 95% of the feeling in my hands.It,s coming back,though.SLOW but better than nothin.I signed up cause I don't sleep much,don't watch TV,and having a rough time playing.I,ve been crazy glueing a flatpick between my thumb and forefinger.They go on a lot easier than they come off.I got the brainstorm of glueing a flatpick to a Thumbpic.Gonna try it today.Hope you sold the tele cause you wanted to,not had to.Hope you got something cool to replace it.I,ve got a black 68 custom lefty.It weighs about 300lbs with my hands like this.The red 330 is my baby.Its in my pics.But To be honest with you,I've got a lefty Schecter C! classic that I play all day,just in case I drop something.It's actually great to play.Fast,unbelievable sustain,real duncan humbuckers, 5 piece neck thru,There's a pic in my pics.The case on the 59 is probably worth more than it is,but it's just a name.Keep playing,good luck,have fun.panhead201 Hell,I'd never been online til a month ago,but my wife,s into E-bay.
#27
Quote by Mars Rover
Finding a deal on a guitar that's worth thousands more than you paid is rare. You're much more likely to pay more than its worth - and maybe more than it will ever be worth in the high-end vintage market. However, deals on guitars that regularly sell for hundreds more than you might pay are fairly common.

Who knew that MIJ guitars would go up in value? Desirable models often go for more than they cost new-sometimes much more. You can still find deals. My 1979 MIJ Ibanez was $90 to me about 10 years ago. It goes for about $500 now and some people ask more than that. My MIJ ESP Tele copy was $165. Some sellers ask up to $1,000 - but $600 is realistic. Both were bought used from music stores. I also have an ESP MIJ P-Bass copy that was $175 – also from a music store.

In general, I won't buy a guitar unless it's at least a couple hundred less than I know it's worth. Most can be sold for at least double of what I paid. Lower end, not-quite-vintage instruments that can retain or gain value are almost always MIJ or USA. However, finding great deals are not every day occurrences-but are common enough if you do enough digging. You have to do your homework. Buying for yourself is really no different than what dealers, buying to re-sell for profit do. I dabble in selling and trading but not that much.

I've seen a couple of MIJ strats from the eighty,s that I'd have bought in a second.But you can only play one at a time and I've got stuff stacked up all around here.Sometimes it'll take me a day to find something I know I have.Hell,I've got harmonica,s from the sixties.Go to my pics and look at my TV special.Got it new in 55
#28
Quote by Mars Rover
Finding a deal on a guitar that's worth thousands more than you paid is rare. You're much more likely to pay more than its worth - and maybe more than it will ever be worth in the high-end vintage market. However, deals on guitars that regularly sell for hundreds more than you might pay are fairly common.

Who knew that MIJ guitars would go up in value? Desirable models often go for more than they cost new-sometimes much more. You can still find deals. My 1979 MIJ Ibanez was $90 to me about 10 years ago. It goes for about $500 now and some people ask more than that. My MIJ ESP Tele copy was $165. Some sellers ask up to $1,000 - but $600 is realistic. Both were bought used from music stores. I also have an ESP MIJ P-Bass copy that was $175 – also from a music store.

In general, I won't buy a guitar unless it's at least a couple hundred less than I know it's worth. Most can be sold for at least double of what I paid. Lower end, not-quite-vintage instruments that can retain or gain value are almost always MIJ or USA. However, finding great deals are not every day occurrences-but are common enough if you do enough digging. You have to do your homework. Buying for yourself is really no different than what dealers, buying to re-sell for profit do. I dabble in selling and trading but not that much.

Hell,I wish I had that kind of discipline.Sometimes I'll pick one up and end up taking it home.panhead201
#29
Quote by Mars Rover
Finding a deal on a guitar that's worth thousands more than you paid is rare. You're much more likely to pay more than its worth - and maybe more than it will ever be worth in the high-end vintage market. However, deals on guitars that regularly sell for hundreds more than you might pay are fairly common.

Who knew that MIJ guitars would go up in value? Desirable models often go for more than they cost new-sometimes much more. You can still find deals. My 1979 MIJ Ibanez was $90 to me about 10 years ago. It goes for about $500 now and some people ask more than that. My MIJ ESP Tele copy was $165. Some sellers ask up to $1,000 - but $600 is realistic. Both were bought used from music stores. I also have an ESP MIJ P-Bass copy that was $175 – also from a music store.

In general, I won't buy a guitar unless it's at least a couple hundred less than I know it's worth. Most can be sold for at least double of what I paid. Lower end, not-quite-vintage instruments that can retain or gain value are almost always MIJ or USA. However, finding great deals are not every day occurrences-but are common enough if you do enough digging. You have to do your homework. Buying for yourself is really no different than what dealers, buying to re-sell for profit do. I dabble in selling and trading but not that much.

They copy our stuff and make it better than we do.Hell,back in the eightys they wemt to a 6 day work week instead of 7 and they had to put up fences to keep em out.Not exactly a union shop.
#30
If you buy a Benedetto at $10,000 and leave in the case for 10 years, you will probably be able to sell it for at least double what you paid, perhaps more.

If you find a Vintage Gibson L5 or D'Aquisto New Yorker from the 50's in a pawn shop in excellent shape for $100, you can make some bucks.

Otherwise, almost all guitars decrease in value.
#31
Just as a FYI: if you like the old Vox Teardrop, but haven't been lucky enough to find one, Phantom Guitars has been making a replica for some time now.

http://www.phantomguitars.com/teardrop.html
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#32
Guitar isnt an investment. Buy something that sont lose it's value over time. Just buy a nice strong guitar, and play with it all your life. Buy something nice, high quality and use it properly, so it will protect it's value. But you may buy known brands. Gibson, fender, ibanez,etc are just some of most known guitar brands. But there are also many less known great brands.
#33
Quote by panhead201
Yeah,I got a 59 lefty Goldtop,but they discontinued em for a reason.it looks kinda pink and the wiring was half ass.The first re-issue was in 68.They made em for 68-69.I bought the lefty 68 on Friday.I'm gonna wear out this keyboard hitting fedex tracking so many times.He labeled it Medical Equip.Get it tuesday but I live way out in the country on a 1/2 mile private road.Fedex andUPS just leave stuff on my porch.So this is SIG required.And I'm going to town to buy numbers to stick on my mailbox.panhead.....I don't know if your being modest but if thats a lousy rep of your playing you ain't doin too bad.

I would definitely like to see pictures of these guitars...

And thanks. But that really wasn't me at my best. I learnt the song about 5 minutes before I recorded it. I don't rate my playing that highly anyway. Other people say good things every now and then but when looking up to people like Jimmy Page and Hendrix or whatever, it's hard to find anything decent in my playing haha
#34
So apparently I misunderstood the word 'investment'
Quote by GuitarGod_92
when I die of a brain aneurysm I want it on record that its the film threads fault

Quote by GuitarGod_92
Movies are all bad every last one of them

Quote by yope
Fungus has a right to exist. It's a valid life form.
#35
Quote by ThrashUnleashed
So apparently I misunderstood the word 'investment'

You meant as an investment in one's own skills and growth as an artist, right?

Its not what the OP meant, but it's a perfectly valid interpretation.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#36
Pre Samick Valley arts. They've shot up a lot in the last 2 years alone.
Quote by Skraeling86
That's a lot of booze. Frankly, I'm impressed. You're of a stronger timber than the average man, jimbob! Hail you.



Quote by Bubban
Yes you should go to a doctor, fucking moron. We can't do anything about your hemorrhoid.


#37
I think the only way you can buy a guitar as an investment, is if you pursue a career in music. Then the guitar will have more value than money.
455 75 34 88


(´・ω・`)


Quote by strait jacket
Do you like being sigged or, like me do you feel strangely violated?
#38
Quote by WholeLottaIzzy
I would definitely like to see pictures of these guitars...

And thanks. But that really wasn't me at my best. I learnt the song about 5 minutes before I recorded it. I don't rate my playing that highly anyway. Other people say good things every now and then but when looking up to people like Jimmy Page and Hendrix or whatever, it's hard to find anything decent in my playing haha

A friend turned the whole basement of the new house he built into a climate controlled gun safe.Thats where the 59 is. but I probably got a picture here somewhere.I never play it and I never lock my house.I don't even know where the keys are.The black 68 custom is here,though.When I get my 68 Goldtop tomorrow,I'll take pictures of both of them.The ES330 and ES 355 are in the pics on my profile.There's also a guitar on there I call my TV Special.It's the first guitar I ever got,in 1955.Still has the original strings and strap.I still play it sometimes.panhead
Last edited by panhead201 at Mar 26, 2012,
#39
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Just as a FYI: if you like the old Vox Teardrop, but haven't been lucky enough to find one, Phantom Guitars has been making a replica for some time now.

http://www.phantomguitars.com/teardrop.html

If you're talking to panhead,I can't play one cause I gotta play sitting down if it's for any length of time.Ovals and Flying V,s are almost impossible to play sitting down.I think what the guy meant originally was what could he buy that would increase in value when he sold it.That's how I took it anyway.panhead
#40
I was just talking in general- a way to get a teardrop guitar if you want one but can't find a Vox in good condition at a fair price.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Mar 26, 2012,
Page 1 of 2