#1
Hello UG! I would consider myself as just past the beginner stage, and have had about 10 lessons with a teacher.

The lessons are just me going along, him asking me what song I want to learn, and me struggling to play the song for the duration of the lesson and I feel like I'm not really learning anything.

I feel like this is pointless because I can get tab off this website and learn songs myself.

I want to become a great guitarist, I am very dedicated and put in an hour+ practice each day.

What can I do to achieve this goal? Is my teacher crap or do I have different expectations of what a teacher should do?
#2
An hour+ isn't really much... When I started out it was at least 4 hours of practice each day.
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#3
make it clear to your teacher what your goals are.

chances are he's trying to teach you fundamentals and techniques,

often times you can learn something from tabs however you might miss a lot with technique, theory, and proper rehearsal.

when you first start out i think an hour is fine, especially while you are getting your callouses built up.
#4
Quote by Michaelob
Hello UG! I would consider myself as just past the beginner stage, and have had about 10 lessons with a teacher.

The lessons are just me going along, him asking me what song I want to learn, and me struggling to play the song for the duration of the lesson and I feel like I'm not really learning anything.

I feel like this is pointless because I can get tab off this website and learn songs myself.

I want to become a great guitarist, I am very dedicated and put in an hour+ practice each day.

What can I do to achieve this goal? Is my teacher crap or do I have different expectations of what a teacher should do?


Well i'll start with what you can do to start achieving your goal.

I don't know what kind of music you play so i'm going to list this in a very simple way and not go into much depth. What you want to study is:

Technique - Songs you want to learn and later on songs you want to write may require different kinds of guitar techniques. There is a whole bunch of them such as Alternate picking, Economy picking, Sweep Picking, Legato, Tapping, Bending, Vibrato etc.

Chords - Studying chords is not a beginner thing, wich some guitarists sadly think. They think they are done with chords when they start going into more rock/metal. But knowing chords can be be very large benefit for any guitar player. You can create more unusual progressions and even take it into your lead playing.

Scales - Scales is the foundation of most music you play. It can tell you common chords and notes you can use. Learning the Major scale, the minor scale and the pentatonic scale is very good for any player. Going beyond that is up to you though. WARNING: DO NOT LOCK YOURSELF INTO BOXES

Music Theory - Music Theory is often overlooked by guitar players (atleast the ones i know). They think they don't need it, but learning it will make you amazingly better as a player, not even to mention as a musician. Music theory describes how music works. Learning to read notation can be very benefitial!

Ear training - One of the most (if not the most) important things is to develop your ear. It can help you learn songs there is no tabs for, or notation for. As well as help you compose better, hear some music in your head you want to get out on the guitar? You need to be able to imagine it and recreate it.
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#5
I would recommend using a teacher in the way you want a teacher to be used. You're paying them to help you, so tell them how you want them to help you. If all you want to do is noodle around with scales and improvisation, ask to be taught about scales and scale theory (although, regardless of what you want to do, you really ought to learn this anyway). If you want to learn songs, get tabs at home, listen to the song; if there's anything you can't get, go to your teacher, ask him to explain. Tailor the service to suit you, if you have a good teacher they should want to help you, but only you know what you want to do with regards to learning.

Also, what's your definition of a 'great guitarist'?
#6
Quote by Michaelob
Hello UG! I would consider myself as just past the beginner stage, and have had about 10 lessons with a teacher.

The lessons are just me going along, him asking me what song I want to learn, and me struggling to play the song for the duration of the lesson and I feel like I'm not really learning anything.

I feel like this is pointless because I can get tab off this website and learn songs myself.

I want to become a great guitarist, I am very dedicated and put in an hour+ practice each day.

What can I do to achieve this goal? Is my teacher crap or do I have different expectations of what a teacher should do?


I also consider myself a beginner (I've been playing for about 1 year and 1 month), and sometimes I have the same kind of frustration after having a guitar lesson.

But I do think you teacher should help you to do stuff you wouldn't be able to do/notice by yourself; I mean, he teachs you to play, not to imitate notes.

For example, it happens to me a lot of times I play a note that has to be bended and maybe I bend it in a similar way, but not the SAME way, it doesn't give the same feel; but I don't notice it until my teachers says me it's to work on and shows me how is it supposed to be one.
Or another example, I was learning holy diver (not very difficult song), but I didn't notice the palm muting stuff, and without palm muting the song doesn't sound nearly as cool as the original one.

I think this kind of stuff is important to become a good musician, because it makes you pay attention to some details maybe you wouldn't be so careful about.

Obiously it's only my opinion about learning songs during lessons. BTW, if you've done only 10 lessons (which should be 2 1/2 months of playing or so, I guess), you can't pretend to have an entire song done in a hour of lesson. But do so, it may help you to improve your skills faster. Just don't skip important stuff that may seem to be only details at first look.

I hope you understand what I mean, and sorry for bad english.
#7
Quote by henrihell
An hour+ isn't really much... When I started out it was at least 4 hours of practice each day.


+1

I practiced for 4+ a day...
its worth it.
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Well, technically it could be done, but only in the same way that you could change a cat into a hamburger. It's an unpleasant process, and nobody is happy with the result.
#9
haha. i practise for 5 hours a day on school days and in the holidays ill practis for 6 up to 10 hours. i win bitches.
#10
Quote by TheDuckMajor
haha. i practise for 5 hours a day on school days and in the holidays ill practis for 6 up to 10 hours. i win bitches.


Too bad that it's not how long you practice, rather how.
#11
Quote by Aralingh
Too bad that it's not how long you practice, rather how.


so everyone elses points dont mean anything either
of course if you practise badly for 6 hours youarent going to improve much at all but you wont improve if you practise really well for half an hour either. its just not enough time to actually improve. BTW, i know how to run my time and i have a practise schedule.

1 1/2 hours of technique
3/4 hour of theory practise that im given as homework
1 hour of songs/scales or anything else given as homework
The rest of the time is spent doing what i want to do for example writing music, improvising, learning songs that i want to learn or studying different styles.
Last edited by TheDuckMajor at Mar 24, 2012,
#12
Quote by TheDuckMajor
so everyone elses points dont mean anything either
of course if you practise badly for 6 hours youarent going to improve much at all but you wont improve if you practise really well for half an hour either. its just not enough time to actually improve. BTW, i know how to run my time and i have a practise schedule.

1 1/2 hours of technique
3/4 hour of theory practise that im given as homework
1 hour of songs/scales or anything else given as homework
The rest of the time is spent doing what i want to do for example writing music, improvising, learning songs that i want to learn or studying different styles.


I'm just saying that practice time and the positive result of it aren't in a direct relationship, the more practice time you put into it, the less the increment of positive result is applied to the initial positive result. The positive result is exponentially going lower with the rise of practice time.
#13
Quote by henrihell
An hour+ isn't really much... When I started out it was at least 4 hours of practice each day.


I often do practice up to 4 hours, 1 hour+ does equate to 4 or more y'know.
#15
Quote by Aralingh
I'm just saying that practice time and the positive result of it aren't in a direct relationship, the more practice time you put into it, the less the increment of positive result is applied to the initial positive result. The positive result is exponentially going lower with the rise of practice time.


Why would that be the case? if you practise well then the longer you do so the better you'll become.
#16
Quote by henrihell
An hour+ isn't really much... When I started out it was at least 4 hours of practice each day.

Quality>Quantity man

Although you do need to invest a certain amount of time into practicing guitar everyday, and hour a day should be fine.
#17
10,000 hours

Malcolm Gladwell and others have observed that people who truly excel at complex tasks (music, sports, painting, chess, etc) have spent at least 10,000 hours practicing.

But, what is it you want to be good at?

If it is doing gymnastics on the guitar, just sit in your basement with a metronome and whittle away for 8 hours a day and after 4 years or so you will be the best finger gymnast you can be ... but you won't be a musician.

To get really good at music you have to do it. Play in a band, practice with other musicians, train your ear, learn songs, practice reading, learn chord forms, learn scale forms, learn techniques, practice rhythm ... you know .. GOFERIT.

10,000 hours of gigging/rehearsing/solo practice/ear training/reading/comping/jamming/playing along with recordings later, you will definitely be a damn good guitar player.

So, enjoy yourself -- it's going to take a while and there are no shortcuts.
#18
Quote by TheDuckMajor
Why would that be the case? if you practise well then the longer you do so the better you'll become.


What I'm saying, is this:

hop= hour of practice
x = skill gain in the hour

1st hop= x
2nd hop= (a bit) less than x
3rd hop= (less) than x
4th hop= (even more) less than x
5th hop= (significantly) less than x
6th hop= (much more significantly) less than x


And so on. The more you practice the more you get, of course. But playing for excessive amount of time over the usual amount will give you LITTLE advantage compared to the average play time, which you can be using for many other things. Which means you spend a lot of over-time to attain only a bit of advantage, in my opinion, that's just not worth it.
#19
Quote by Aralingh
What I'm saying, is this:

hop= hour of practice
x = skill gain in the hour

1st hop= x
2nd hop= (a bit) less than x
3rd hop= (less) than x
4th hop= (even more) less than x
5th hop= (significantly) less than x
6th hop= (much more significantly) less than x


And so on. The more you practice the more you get, of course. But playing for excessive amount of time over the usual amount will give you LITTLE advantage compared to the average play time, which you can be using for many other things. Which means you spend a lot of over-time to attain only a bit of advantage, in my opinion, that's just not worth it.


Ok, i get your point. But playing is by far my favourite hobby. If you enjoy it then it's not a waste of time. I wouldn't play just to get better. I play to enjoy it and getting better just helps me enjoy it more and hopefully make a career out of it.
#21
Quote by TheDuckMajor
Ok, i get your point. But playing is by far my favourite hobby. If you enjoy it then it's not a waste of time. I wouldn't play just to get better. I play to enjoy it and getting better just helps me enjoy it more and hopefully make a career out of it.


That's great for you, but you might find some interesting things outside of music too, but if you just always play the whole day, you might not discover those.
#22
Quote by TheDuckMajor
so everyone elses points dont mean anything either
of course if you practise badly for 6 hours youarent going to improve much at all but you wont improve if you practise really well for half an hour either. its just not enough time to actually improve. BTW, i know how to run my time and i have a practise schedule.

1 1/2 hours of technique
3/4 hour of theory practise that im given as homework
1 hour of songs/scales or anything else given as homework
The rest of the time is spent doing what i want to do for example writing music, improvising, learning songs that i want to learn or studying different styles.


Dude, shut...up...
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