#1
How do you properly direct in with a bass and guitar? Do you literally just plug in to the mixer or is there anything you need to limit the signal and whatever? Also how do you combine the sound of a direct in bass to a miced amp for recording?
#2
You'll want a DI box. Musician's Friend and others sell them. Not to confuse you more, but you have your choice of active and passive.

Best way to combine the two would be to use two channels on your DAW. Use one for the DI'd bass, and the other for the miked guitar amp.

On some mixers, like my Presonus 16.4.2 (photos of my studio gear in My Gear Info), you can plug a guitar directly into the patch panel on the rear. You can also do the same thing with most dedicated mike preamps, such as the Universal Audio LA-610 Mk II, which I'm planning to purchase soon.

For limiting the signal, you can use your DAW and interface to prevent the signal from clipping. Just set the audio levels so your signal doesn't clip. You can also use a compressor/limiter. I use an ART Pro VLA II on occasion for that purpose. Most DAW software have compression utilities you can add to a track and then adjust for best effect.

What are you currently using for an interface and DAW software?
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Mar 24, 2012,
#3
Get a good quality DI box like a Radial and it will make a huge difference to the recorded sound - don't skimp on it just because it's something which doesn't add to the sound, it's a very important part of the signal chain.
#4
You do not want a DI Box, you want a USB interface, it's a common misconception.
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#5
A quality DI box going into a USB interface is superior to just going into a USB interface
#6
Quote by Chargrill3d
A quality DI box going into a USB interface is superior to just going into a USB interface


Explain your logic.
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#8
Wrong? Not really. Ideal, definitely not, USB interfaces have far lower latency.
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#9
Quote by Chargrill3d
A quality DI box going into a USB interface is superior to just going into a USB interface

Not really.

Once you get into interfaces in the Focusrite Saffire range or higher, DI boxes become fairly worthless for recording. Unless you need to split your signal and are using a DI box to send to your DAW and thru to an amp, a mid-range interface will have just as good of DI inputs as plugging in a dedicated DI box.

Having owned literally every sub-$200 DI box and A/Bing them with stock instrument inputs on both a Saffire Pro 40 and a Fireface UFX, the difference is extremely minute. I sold them all, because it wasn't worth it at all. There might be minimal differences, but not enough that it's going to make or break any recording, hell, I doubt you'd even be able to hear much of a difference in the first place, if any.

Once you get into the high end mic pres with DIs in them, then yes, the difference is more noticeable, but at that point it's more of a colored sound, and is subjective as to whether it's better or not.
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#10
Quote by ChemicalFire
Wrong? Not really. Ideal, definitely not, USB interfaces have far lower latency.

I disagree with that, in my experience analog is generally capable of lower latency than a USB interface. In terms of quality it's a different story though.


DI boxes are generally used to run an instrument into an analog mixing console (be it live or in a studio). They match impedance, levels and grounding to get a good clean signal.

If you're recording through a USB interface, they're set up for instrument-level input and there's no real benefit to using a DI box - unless you enjoy adding more noise to the signal chain.
#11
A quality DI box going into the interface's mic input is way better than just going straight into the interface's DI input. The DI box is a piece of gear that is dedicated to dropping the signal from instrument level to mic level. Using a dedicated DI also allows you to use an external preamp if you wish, which would be way better than using your interface's preamps (most of the time).
That being said, the difference is minimal, and unless you're doing professional recordings that will be commercially released, it probably doesn't matter. I can say from experience that using a DI box going into my Saffire sounds better than going straight into the Saffire. Hell, even using an outboard DI going into an SSL 9000J console sounds better than using the SSl's onboard DI input.
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